Peter Shergold

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Professor
Peter Shergold
AC
RichardsonHowardShergold.jpg
Shergold (right) in his capacity as Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet; with then Prime Minister John Howard at a 2005 meeting in the United States.
Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney
Incumbent
Assumed office
1 January 2011 (2011-01-01)
Preceded by John Phillips
Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
In office
10 February 2003 (2003-02-10) – 28 February 2008 (2008-02-28)
Preceded by Max Moore-Wilton
Succeeded by Terry Moran
Personal details
Born Peter Roger Shergold
(1946-09-27) 27 September 1946 (age 68)
Crawley New Town, England
Nationality Australia Australian
Alma mater University of Hull;
University of Illinois;
London School of Economics
Occupation Academic; Public servant; Company director
[1][2]

Peter Roger Shergold AC (born 27 September 1946) is an Australian academic, company director, and former public servant. Shergold has been the Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney since 2011.

Between February 2003 and February 2008, he was the Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and as such was the most senior official in the Australian Public Service.

Education and early career[edit]

Shergold was born in Crawley New Town, England.[3] He earned a Bachelor of Arts (first-class) in politics and American studies from the University of Hull, and later a Master of Arts degree in American History from the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle and a PhD from the London School of Economics. After moving to Australia, he became a lecturer in economics at the University of New South Wales in 1972. He was appointed as head of the university's economic history department in 1985. His dissertation in comparative labour history was published as Working-Class Life: The "American Standard" in Comparative Perspective, 1899-1913 in 1982.

Public service career[edit]

In 1987 he began working for the Australian federal government, firstly as head of the newly established Office of Multicultural Affairs. Having become deputy secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet in 1990, he was appointed the CEO of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (1991–1994) and Comcare, a federal government workers' compensation authority (1994–1995). From 1995 to 1998, he was the Commissioner of the Australian Public Service. He has also been the Secretary of the Department of Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business (1998–2001) and the Department of Education, Science and Training (2001–03). In 2003 he was appointed Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Academic and business career[edit]

After retiring from the Australian public service in February 2008, Shergold became the first head of the Centre for Social Impact, a joint collaboration between the business schools of the University of New South Wales, Melbourne Business School, Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Western Australia.[4] In that capacity he was a frequent media commentator on the relationship between governments and not-for-profit organisations, new forms of social business and entrepreneurship and corporate responsibility and accountability. He co-hosted 'Social Business' on SKYNews Business Channel.

From 2006-08, Shergold served as the chairman of the Australia and New Zealand School of Government. He is currently a non-executive director of financial services company AMP Limited and Australian law firm Corrs Chambers Westgarth. He is chairman of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research and the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation and serves on the boards of the General Sir John Monash Foundation[5] and the National Centre for Indigenous Excellence. He chairs the ethics committee of the Fundraising Institute Australia.

In 2011 Shergold became the Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney;[1] and was appointed as chairman of New South Wales' Public Service Commission.[6]

Honours[edit]

In 1996, Shergold was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia,[7] and a Companion of the Order in 2007 for service to the community as a significant leader of changes and innovation in the public sector, particularly through the development and implementation of a whole-of-government approach to policy development and program delivery.[8] Shergold was a recipient of the Centenary Medal in 2001.[9]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Peter Shergold appointed UWS Chancellor". University of Western Sydney (Press release). Australian School of Business. 25 October 2010. Retrieved 2 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Hare, Julie (27 October 2010). "Heavy hitters take top jobs". The Australian. Retrieved 2 November 2013. 
  3. ^ Shergold 2012, p. 61.
  4. ^ Armitage, Catherine (10 December 2007). "Top public servant to take post". The Australian. 
  5. ^ The General Sir John Monash Foundation
  6. ^ Nicholls, Sean (14 April 2011). "Howard's man takes the reins for O'Farrell". The Sydney Morning Herald. 
  7. ^ Member of the Order of Australia (AM), It's an Honour
  8. ^ Companion of the Order of Australia (AC), 26 January 2007, It's an Honour. Retrieved 30 December 2007.
  9. ^ Centenary Medal, It's an Honour

References and further reading[edit]

Academic offices
Preceded by
John Phillips
Chancellor of the University of Western Sydney
2011 – present
Incumbent
Government offices
Preceded by
Max Moore-Wilton
Secretary of the
Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

2003–2008
Succeeded by
Terry Moran
Preceded by
Steve Sedgwick
Secretary of the
Department of Education, Science and Training

2001–2003
Succeeded by
Wendy Jarvie (Acting)
New title
Department established
Secretary of the
Department of Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business

1998–2001
Department abolished
Preceded by
David Rosalky
Secretary of the
Department of Workplace Relations and Small Business

1998
Department abolished
Preceded by
Dennis Ives
Commissioner of the Australian Public Service
1995–1998
Succeeded by
Helen Williams