Piper sarmentosum

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Piper sarmentosum
Piper sarmentosum.jpg
A Piper sarmentosum plant
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Magnoliids
Order: Piperales
Family: Piperaceae
Genus: Piper
Species: P. sarmentosum
Binomial name
Piper sarmentosum
Roxb.

Piper sarmentosum is a plant in the Piperaceae family used in many Southeast Asian cuisines. The leaves are often confused with betel,[1] but they lack the intense taste of the betel leaves and are significantly smaller.

Names[edit]

There is no "official" English name for it, but it is sometimes called wild betel. It is known as chaphlu (ชะพลู, pronounced [t͡ɕʰá.pʰlūː]) or cha phlu (ช้าพลู, pronounced [t͡ɕʰáː pʰlūː]) in Thai; phak i leut or pak eelerd (ຜັກອີ່ເລີດ) in Lao; and pokok kadok in Malay. In Vietnam, the local name of Piper lolotlá lốt – is applied to P. sarmentosum also.

Geographic distribution[edit]

P. sarmentosum is found from the tropical areas of Southeast Asia, Northeast India and South China, and as far as the Andaman Islands.[2]

In cuisine[edit]

P. sarmentosum leaves are sold in bunches and are usually eaten raw.

Traditional medicine[edit]

P. sarmentosum leaves are used in traditional Asian medicines.[4] Chemical analysis has shown the leaves contain the antioxidant naringenin.[5] Amides from P. sarmentosum fruit have been shown to have anti-tuberculosis and anti-plasmodial activities.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Piper sarmentosum". Asia Food Glossary. Asia Source. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  2. ^ "Piper sarmentosum Roxb. – An addition to the flora of Andaman Islands". Current Science 87 (2). July 25, 2004. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  3. ^ Kaeng Khae Kai (Katurai Chilli Soup with Chicken)
  4. ^ Hussain, Khalid; Furqan; Hashmi, Kurshid; Latif, Abida; Ismail, Zhari; Sadikun, Amirin (2012). "A review of the literature and latest advances in research of Piper sarmentosum". Pharmaceutical Biology 50 (8): 1045–1052. doi:10.3109/13880209.2011.654229. 
  5. ^ Subramaniam, Vimala. "Natural Antioxidants: Piper sarmentosum (Kadok) and Morinda elliptica (Mengkudu)". Malaysian Journal of Nutrition 9 (1). Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  6. ^ "Chemical constituents and bioactivity of Piper sarmentosum". Journal of Ethnopharmacology 93 (2–3): 173–6. August 2004. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2004.01.022. PMID 15234750. Retrieved 2008-09-08.