Politics of the Central African Republic

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This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Central African Republic

The politics of the Central African Republic formally take place in a framework of a semi-presidential republic. In this system, the President is the head of state, with a Prime Minister as head of government. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and parliament.

Changes in government have occurred in recent years by three methods: violence, negotiations, and elections. Both Bozize and Djotodia assumed the Presidency through takeover by violent means; however, elections were held in March 2005 and promised in 2013. A ceasefire agreement in January 2013 called for a multipartisan unity government.

The government was deposed in 15 March 2003 by forces under the rebel leader François Bozizé, who promised elections in 18 to 30 months. A new cabinet was set up in 1 April 2003. Elections were held on 13 March 2005.

On 11 January 2013, a ceasefire was signed by the Séléka rebel coalition, which had aimed to bring down the government of President Bozizé. According to this agreement, a new unity government would be formed. The President would appoint a new prime minister from the opposition parties, and the National Assembly of the Central African Republic would be dissolved and new legislative elections would be held within twelve months.[1]

However, two months later, the Séléka rebels felt their terms were not being met, and at the culmination of the 2012-2013 Central African Republic conflict, they attacked and took the capital, Bangui. The president, Bozizé, fled to neighboring Cameroon via the Democratic Republic of Congo on 24 March 2013.[2][3]

Executive branch[edit]

Main office holders
Office Name Party Since
Head of State of the Transition (Acting President) Catherine Samba-Panza Independent 23 January 2014
Acting Prime Minister André Nzapayeké Independent 25 January 2014

The president is elected by popular vote for a six-year term, the prime minister is appointed by the president. The president also appoints and presides over the Council of Ministers, which initiates laws and oversees government operations.

Legislative branch[edit]

The National Assembly (Assemblée Nationale) has 105 members, elected for a five-year term using the two-round (or Run-off) system.

Political parties and elections[edit]

For other political parties see List of political parties in the Central African Republic. An overview on elections and election results is included in Elections in the Central African Republic.
e • d Summary of the 13 March and 8 May 2005 Central African Republic presidential election results
Candidates (Nominating parties) Votes 1st round % Votes 2nd round %
François Bozizé (Independent) 382,241 42.97% 610,903 64.60%
Martin Ziguélé (Movement for the Liberation of the Central African People) 209,357 23.53% 334,716 35.40%
André Kolingba (Central African Democratic Rally) 145,495 16.36% - -
Jean-Paul Ngoupandé (National Unity Party) 45,182 5.08% - -
Charles Massi (Democratic Forum for Modernity) 28,618 3.22% - -
Abel Goumba (Patriotic Front for Progress) 22,297 2.51% - -
Henri Pouzère (Independent) 18,647 2.10% - -
Josué Binoua (Independent) 13,559 1.52% - -
Jean-Jacques Démafouth (Independent) 11,279 1.27% - -
Auguste Boukanga (Union for Renewal and Democracy) 7,085 0.80% - -
Olivier Gabirault (Alliance for Democracy and Progress) 5,834 0.66% - -
Total 889,594   945,619  
Invalid votes 57,022 32,111
Total votes 946,616 977,730
Registered voters 1,302,930 1,452,211
Voter turnout 72.7% 67.3%
Source: African Elections Database
e • d Summary of the 13 March and 8 May 2005 National Assembly of the Central African Republic election results
Parties Votes % Seats
National Convergence "Kwa Na Kwa" (Convergence Nationale "Kwa Na Kwa") 42
Movement for the Liberation of the Central African People (Mouvement pour la Libération du Peuple Centrafricain) 11
Central African Democratic Rally (Rassemblement Démocratique Centrafricain) 8
Social Democratic Party (Parti Social Démocratique) 4
Patriotic Front for Progress (Front Patriotique pour le Progrès) 2
Alliance for Democracy and Progress (Alliance pour la Démocratie et le Progrès) 2
Löndö Association (Association Löndö) 1
Non partisans 34
Invalidated 1
Total (turnout  %)   105

Judicial branch[edit]

The Supreme Court, or Cour Supreme, is made up of judges appointed by the president. There is also a Constitutional Court, and its judges are also appointed by the president.

Administrative divisions[edit]

The Central African Republic is divided in 14 prefectures (prefectures), 2 economic prefectures* (prefectures economiques), and 1 commune**; Bamingui-Bangoran, Bangui**, Basse-Kotto, Gribingui*, Haute-Kotto, Haute-Sangha, Haut-Mbomou, Kemo-Gribingui, Lobaye, Mbomou, Nana-Mambere, Ombella-Mpoko, Ouaka, Ouham, Ouham-Pende, Sangha*, Vakaga.

International organization participation[edit]

ACCT, ACP, AfDB, BDEAC, CCC, CEEAC, ECA, FAO, FZ, G-77, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICFTU, ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, Intelsat, Interpol, IOC, ITU, NAM, OAU, OIC (observer), OPCW, UDEAC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL[disambiguation needed], WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO, WTrO

References[edit]

  1. ^ Central African Republic ceasefire signed
  2. ^ "Central African Republic president flees capital amid violence, official says". CNN. 24 Mar 2013. Retrieved 24 Mar 2013. 
  3. ^ Lydia Polgreen (25 March 2013). "Leader of Central African Republic Fled to Cameroon, Official Says". The New York Times.