Rhinophoridae

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Rhinophoridae
Fly August 2007-8.jpg
Stevenia sp.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Suborder: Brachycera
Section: Schizophora
Subsection: Calyptratae
Superfamily: Oestroidea
Family: Rhinophoridae
Genera

23+

Rhinophora lepida on Cardamine pratensis (video, 1m 50s)

Rhinophoridae is a family of flies (Diptera). They are found in all zoogeographic regions except Australasia and Oceania but mainly in the Palaearctic and Afrotropical regions.

They are small slender black bristly flies phylogenetically close to Tachinidae although some authors consider them a sister group of Calliphoridae. The larvae are mostly parasitoids of woodlice, beetles, spiders, and other arthropods, and occasionally snails.

By 2014 there were about 23 genera in the family with a total of about 150 species.[1] More are being described continually.[2]

Genera include:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nihei, S. S. and M. R. de Andrade. (2014). Revision of Trypetidomima (Diptera: Rhinophoridae) with description of a new Brazilian species. Florida Entomologist 97(2) 724-33.
  2. ^ a b c d e Cerretti, P., et al. (2014). Remarkable Rhinophoridae in a growing generic genealogy (Diptera: Calyptratae, Oestroidea). Systematic Entomology 39(4) 660–90.
  3. ^ Rhinophoridae. Fauna Europaea.

External links[edit]

  • L. Watson and M. J. Dallwitz (2008-11-25). "Rhinophoridae". British Insects: the Families of Diptera. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Crosskey, R. W. (1977). A review of the Rhinophoridae (Diptera) and a revision of the Afrotropical species. Bull. Br. Mus. Nat. Hist. Ent. 36(1) 66 pp.
  • Herting, B. 1961. Rhinophorinae. In: Lindner E. (ed.), Die Fliegen der palaearktischen Region, IX, 64e. Schweizerbart, Stuttgart.
  • Seguy, E. 1928. Etudes sur le mouches parasites 2 - Ccalliphorides. Calliphorines (suite), Sarcophaginae et Rhinophorinae de l'Europe occidentale et meridionale.Recherches sur la morphologie et la distribution geographique des Dipteres a larves parasites. Encyclopédie Entomologique, 9. Lechevalier, Paris.