Roberto Mussi

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Not to be confused with Roberto Muzzi.
Roberto Mussi
Personal information
Date of birth (1963-08-25) 25 August 1963 (age 51)
Place of birth Massa, Italy
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Centre Back
Youth career
Massese
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1981–1984 Massese 83 (0)
1984–1987 Parma 88 (0)
1987–1989 Milan 30 (0)
1989–1994 Torino 129 (5)
1994–1999 Parma 125 (2)
Total 455 (7)
National team
1993–1996 Italy 11 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Roberto Mussi (born 25 August 1963) is a former Italian footballer, who played as a defender; he was capable of playing both in a centre-back or right-back role. Due to his dynamism, tenacity, work-rate, and technique, he was capable of helping his team both offensively and defensively as a fullback on the flank. Following his retirement, he worked as a manager.[1]

Club career[edit]

In his career, Mussi played for U.S. Massese (1981-84), making his professional debut with the club, helping them to gain promotion to Serie C2. He subsequently moved to Parma in 1984, where he enjoyed a successful spell under Sacchi in Serie C1, helping the club to a Serie B promotion by winning the Serie C title. In 1987, Sacchi purchased his former young fullback, making him part of his legendary Milan side. Mussi spent two seasons with the club (1987-89), winning an Italian Serie A title and a Supercoppa Italiana in 1988, and one European Cup (Champions League) in 1989 with the club. He subsequently moved to Serie B side Torino in 1989, helping the team to win the Serie B title that season, and to earn promotion to Serie A. The following season, he won the 1991 edition of the Mitropa Cup with Torino, and he helped his club to qualify for the UEFA Cup the next season by finishing the Serie A season in fifth place. During the 1991-92 season, Mussi led Torino to a third place finish in Serie A, and he also helped his club to reach the UEFA Cup final, where they were defeated by Ajax on aggregate. During the 1992-93 season, Mussi won the Coppa Italia with Torino, but the team missed out on the 1993 Supercoppa Italiana. In 1994, Mussi returned to Parma, where he enjoyed great success. With the Emilian club, he won the UEFA Cup twice (in 1995 and 1999), and one Coppa Italia in 1999; he also reached the Coppa Italia final in 1995, and he managed a third place finish in Serie A in 1995, a second place league finish in 1997, and a fourth place finish in 1999 with Parma. He retired from football in 1999, but he briefly returned to Massese, the club with which he had made his debut, during the 2010-11 season, in the lower divisions, although he failed to make an appearance for the club during the season. Overall, Mussi played 250 matches in Serie A throughout his career.[2][3]

International career[edit]

For the Italy national team he won 11 caps between 1993-96 under manager Arrigo Sacchi. He participated at the 1994 FIFA World Cup with Italy, where they reached the final, only to lose to Brazil on penalties. He made 3 appearances during the tournament, picking up an injury in the final, and he notably set up Roberto Baggio's last minute equaliser against Nigeria in the round of 16, which enabled the Italians to win the match in extra-time with a Baggio penalty.[4][5][6] He also took part at Euro 1996, making 3 appearances as Italy were eliminated in the group stage.

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Parma[7]
Milan[8]
Torino[9]

International[edit]

Italy[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "AMARCORD GRANATA: ROBERTO MUSSI E MARCO OSIO". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "all' ultimo respiro Baggio trovo' se stesso". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  5. ^ "Aggrappati ad un Codino". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  6. ^ Roberto MussiFIFA competition record
  7. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  8. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  9. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015. 
  10. ^ "Roberto MUSSI". Retrieved 23 January 2015.