Rover Dangerfield

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Rover Dangerfield
Movie poster rover dangerfield.JPG
Theatrical release poster
Directed by James L. George
Bob Seeley
Produced by Willard Carroll
Tom L. Wilhite
Executive Producer:
Rodney Dangerfield
Screenplay by Rodney Dangerfield
Story by Rodney Dangerfield
Harold Ramis
Based on Original Idea:
Rodney Dangerfield
Starring Rodney Dangerfield
Ronnie Schell
Shawn Southwick
Sal Landi
Ned Luke
Bert Kramer
Robert Pine
Dana Hill
Music by David Newman
Edited by Tony Mizgalski
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release dates August 2, 1991
Running time 74 min.
Country United States
Language English

Rover Dangerfield is a 1991 American animated musical comedy film produced by Hyperion Animation and released by Warner Bros., starring the voice talents of comedian Rodney Dangerfield, who also wrote and co-produced the film. It is about a street dog named Rover, who is owned by a Las Vegas showgirl. Rover gets dumped off Hoover Dam by the showgirl's boyfriend. However, rather than drowning, Rover ends up on a farm.

Plot[edit]

Rover lives a life of fun in Las Vegas, gambling and chasing girls with his best friend Eddie. One night, he sees his owner Connie's boyfriend, Rocky, in a transaction with a pair of gangsters, and accidentally disrupts it. Thinking that Rocky is an undercover cop setting them up, the gangsters flee, telling Rocky that he has blown his last chance. The next day, Connie goes on the road for two weeks, leaving Rocky to look after Rover. In revenge for ruining his deal, Rocky puts Rover in a bag, drives him to Hoover Dam, and throws him in the water. The bag is later pulled out of the water by two passing fishermen, who take Rover back to shore and place him in the back of their pickup truck. However, Rover wakes up and jumps out of the truck when the fishermen stop for gas, and begins to wander down the road on his way back to Vegas. Instead, he ends up in the countryside, and eventually runs into a farmer, Cal, and his son, Danny, who convinces his father to take the dog in. Cal agrees on one condition: at the first sign of trouble, he'll be sent to an animal shelter, and if nobody claims him, the animal shelter can put him to sleep.

Rover has difficulty adjusting to life on the farm, but with the help of Daisy, the beautiful dog next door, and the other dogs on the farm, he succeeds in earning his keep. Rover spends Christmas with the family, and begins to fall in love with Daisy, who returns his affections. However, one night in an attempt to save the Christmas turkey from some wolves, Rover ends up caught holding the dead bird, looking as if he killed it. The next morning, Cal takes Rover into the woods to shoot him, but is attacked by the wolves. Rover manages to fight the wolves off, and brings the other farm dogs to get Cal home.

Rover's heroics make the papers, allowing Eddie and Connie to find out where he is. Connie travels to the farm and brings Rover back to Vegas, where Rover confronts Rocky. After Rocky accidentally confesses to Connie what he did, she breaks up with him but not before slapping him in the face. Angered, he tries to retaliate but Rover and his dog friends chase him into the limo of the gangsters. At first, he's relieved that they came to his rescue but questions why were they even there in the first place. While Rover happily listens, the thugs proceed to reveal that they had set him up and imply that they are going to murder him by throwing him over Hoover Dam. Soon after, Rover, missing Daisy, becomes depressed. Connie, realizing this, takes Rover back to the farm to stay. Rover is reunited with Daisy, who reveals to him that he is now a father, unveiling six puppies. The story ends with Rover teaching his kids how to play cards, and playfully chasing Daisy around the farmyard.

Cast[edit]

Releases dates[edit]

  • August 2, 1991 (USA)
  • September 20, 1991 (Canada)
  • December 2, 1991 (UK and Ireland)
  • December 2, 1991 (France)
  • December 2, 1991 (Japan)
  • December 8, 1991 (Denmark)
  • December 8, 1991 (Finland)
  • December 15, 1991 (India and China)
  • December 15, 1991 (New Zealand)
  • January 2, 1992 (Australia)
  • Others More

Production[edit]

Rover Dangerfield was originally conceived in the late 1980s, and was planned at the time for a December 1988 release.[1] It was originally planned as an R-rated animated film, in the vein of Ralph Bakshi's films, but Warner Bros. wanted the film's content to be toned down to a G-rating.[2] Cartoonist Jeff Smith, best known as the creator of the self-published comic book series Bone, described working on key frames for the film's animation to editor Gary Groth in The Comics Journal in 1994.[3]

Release[edit]

The film was released on VHS and LaserDisc on February 12, 1992. Warner Archives later released the film on DVD on December 7, 2010.[4]

Reception[edit]

The film received mixed to negative reviews. Alex Sandell of "Juicy Cerebellum" called it "one of the worst animated films ever, even if you are a fan of Dangerfield", and Cherryl Dawson and Leigh Ann Palone TheMovieChicks.com both agreed that "this movie gets no respect and doesn't deserve any". One of the more positive reviews came from Douglas Pratt of "DVDLaser", saying that "the story is quite entertaining and provides so much of the film's appeal that the artwork just wags along with it".

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beck, Marilyn (1987-04-03). "Donner Works on Sequel". The Victoria Advocate. p. 7D. Retrieved 2010-06-02. A Rodney Is a Rodney Is a Rodney 
  2. ^ http://www.cartoonbrew.com/old-brew/dangerfield-1921-2004.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ The Comics Journal #173 (December 1994). Reproduced at
  4. ^ [1]

External links[edit]