Russell Barry

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Frank Russell Barry DSO (called Russell)[1] was an Anglican Bishop and author[2] who served as Bishop of Southwell for over 20 years in the middle of the 20th century[3] Born on 28 January 1890 he was educated at Bradfield and Oriel College, Oxford and ordained in 1914.[4] From 1915 to 1919, he was a Chaplain with the BEF during which time he was Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Order. After peace returned he was successively Principal of the Ordination Test School at Knutsford, Archdeacon of Egypt, Professor of New Testament Interpretation at King's College London,[5] Fellow and Tutor of Balliol College, Oxford, Canon of Westminster Abbey and Rector of St John's, Smith Square before his elevation to the episcopate. A “recognized leader in Christian thought for over forty years”,[6] he died on 24 October 1976.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Telegraph Obituary – John Bowden
  2. ^ Amongst others he wrote “One Clear Call”, 1922; ”The Relevance of Christianity”, 1931; “The Relevance of the Church”, 1935; “Faith in Dark Ages”, 1940; “Mervyn Haigh”, 1964;and “ Period of My Life” 1974 British Library Catalogue accessed 15:20 May 31st 2008
  3. ^ The Times, Monday, 8 Dec 1941; pg. 6; Issue 49103; col D Ecclesiastical News Bishop Of Southwell Nominated
  4. ^ Who was Who 1987-1990: London, A & C Black, 1991 ISBN 0-7136-3457-X)
  5. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory 1975-76. London: Oxford University Press, 1976. ISBN 0-19-200008-X
  6. ^ The Times, Monday, 25 Oct 1976; pg. 15; Issue 59843; col E The Right Rev F. R. Barry Distinguished liberal churchman
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Henry Mosley
Bishop of Southwell
1941–1964
Succeeded by
Gordon David Savage