Side effect

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In medicine, a side effect is an effect, whether therapeutic or adverse, that is secondary to the one intended; although the term is predominantly employed to describe adverse effects, it can also apply to beneficial, but unintended, consequences of the use of a drug.

Occasionally, drugs are prescribed or procedures performed specifically for their side effects; in that case, said side effect ceases to be a side effect, and is now an intended effect. For instance, X-rays were historically (and are currently) used as an imaging technique; the discovery of their oncolytic capability led to their employ in radiotherapy (ablation of malignant tumours).

Examples of therapeutic side-effects[edit]


Examples of side effects for otoxid capsules includes:

  • Echinacea – more than 20 different types of reactions have been reported, including asthma attacks, loss of pregnancy, hives, swelling, aching muscles and gastrointestinal upsets.
  • Feverfew – pregnant women should avoid using this herb, as it can trigger uterine contractions. In animal experiments, the use of feverfew was found to trigger spontaneous abortions (miscarriages).
  • Asteraceae plants – which include feverfew, echinacea, dandelion and chamomile. Side effects include allergic dermatitis and hay fever.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Boseley, Sarah (2006-06-17). "Drugs firm blocks cheap blindness cure". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2010-05-20. 
  2. ^ Richard Gracer The Buprenorphine Effect on Depression. Naabt.org. February 2007
  3. ^ Bodkin JA. et al. (1995): "Buprenorphine Treatment of Refractory Depression", Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 15:49–57. PMID 7714228
  4. ^ Mood Stabilizers for Bipolar Disorder (Manic Depressive). Leeheymd.com (2003-08-01). Retrieved on 2011-08-17.
  5. ^ a b Wing DA, Powers B, Hickok D (2010). "U.S. Food and Drug Administration Drug Approval: Slow Advances in Obstetric Care in the United States". Obstetrics & Gynecology 115 (4): 825–33. doi:10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181d53843. PMID 20308845. 
  6. ^ Shen WW, Mahadevan J, Hofstatter L, Sata LS (July 1983). "Doxepin as a potent H2 and H2 antihistamine for epigastric distress". Am J Psychiatry 140 (7): 957–8. PMID 6859336. 
  7. ^ OFF-LABEL USE OF GABAPENTIN. Idaho Drug Utilization Review. Educational Leaflet
  8. ^ Pregnancy. drugs.nmihi.com
  9. ^ Medscape: Medscape Access. Emedicine.com. Retrieved on 2011-08-17.

External links[edit]