Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough

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"Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough"
Single by Patty Smyth and Don Henley
from the album Patty Smyth
B-side "Out There"
Released 1992
Format cassette single, CD single, 7" single
Genre Soft rock, adult contemporary
Length 4:28
Label MCA Records
Writer(s) Patty Smyth, Glen Burtnik
Producer(s) Roy Bittan

"Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough" is the title of a 1992 rock ballad performed as a duet by the American singers Patty Smyth and Don Henley.

History[edit]

Smyth was the former lead singer for the band Scandal, whose hits included "The Warrior" and "Goodbye To You"; Henley is a longtime member of the band Eagles (singing lead vocals on "Desperado" and "Hotel California", among many others) as well as a successful solo artist ("The Boys Of Summer", "The End Of The Innocence"). "Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough" was written by Smyth and Glen Burtnik and would appear on her self-titled 1992 album.

Meaning[edit]

The lyrics refer to a past relationship between two people as narrated by the two singers, and their efforts to move on with their respective lives and make sense of the aftermath: There's a reason why people don't stay where they are / Baby sometimes love just ain't enough. In the final chorus, there is a slight lyrical change to this line ("stay where they are" becomes "stay who they are").

Reception[edit]

The single was very successful, being certified Gold by the RIAA and spending six weeks at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the fall of 1992 during the 13 week reign at No. 1 of Boyz II Men's song, "End of the Road". It remained in the Top 40 for 20 weeks.[1] The duet also topped the U.S. adult contemporary chart for four weeks.[2] In Canada, "Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough" spent seven weeks at No. 1 on the Canadian pop chart, while in the United Kingdom, the song reached No. 22 on the British pop chart.[3] The song was also nominated for a Grammy Award in the category Best Pop Vocal, Duo or Group.

Charts[edit]

Cover versions[edit]

  • Filipino diva-actress Jennylyn Mercado revived it as a carrier single of her third album "Love Is". Singaporean singer Stefanie Sun also covered the song for her fourth album, "START".
  • In 2013, country singer Travis Tritt and his daughter Tyler Reese recorded a version for the re-release of Tritt's 2007 album, The Storm.[5] The re-released album was titled The Calm After... and released on Tritt's own Post Oak Records on July 9, 2013.[6] Tritt's version was released as a single in June 2013.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits, 8th Edition (Billboard Publications), page 555.
  2. ^ Hyatt, Wesley (1999). The Billboard Book of #1 Adult Contemporary Hits (Billboard Publications), page 380.
  3. ^ UK Singles Chart info Chartstats.com. Retrieved 1 August 2009.
  4. ^ "Billboard Top 100 - 1992". Retrieved 2010-07-30. 
  5. ^ a b "Travis Tritt duets with his teenage daughter on new single". MSN. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  6. ^ Wyland, Sarah (May 24, 2013). "Travis Tritt Releases Duet with Daughter Tyler Reese". Great American Country. Retrieved May 28, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Restless Heart" by Peter Cetera
Billboard Adult Contemporary number-one single
September 19 - October 12, 1992
Succeeded by
"Nothing Broken but My Heart" by Celine Dion
Preceded by
"End of the Road" by Boyz II Men
Billboard Mainstream Top 40 number-one single
October 10–24, 1992
Succeeded by
"How Do You Talk to an Angel" by The Heights