Springsteen (song)

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"Springsteen"
Single by Eric Church
from the album Chief
Released February 21, 2012 (2012-02-21)
Format Music download
Recorded 2011
Genre Country, heartland rock
Length 3:37 (single version)
4:23 (album version)
Label EMI Nashville
Writer(s) Eric Church
Jeff Hyde
Ryan Tyndell
Producer(s) Jay Joyce
Eric Church singles chronology
"Drink in My Hand"
(2011)
"Springsteen"
(2012)
"Creepin'"
(2012)

"Springsteen" is a song recorded by American country music artist Eric Church. It was composed by Church, Jeff Hyde and Ryan Tyndell for Church's third studio album, Chief.[1] The song was released as the album's third single on February 21, 2012. The song was inspired by a memory of a girl and another artist's song, but he chose to center it around an idol of his, Bruce Springsteen, and tells the story of a teenage romance.

"Springsteen" was generally received with favorable reviews by music critics, who claimed that the song's great melody and strong lyrics made it one of the top country songs of 2011. The single reached number nineteen on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming Church's first song to enter the top twenty. The song also topped the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs. Outside of the United States, the song peaked at 28 on the Canadian Hot 100. "Springsteen" was certified platinum twice by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). The song was nominated for two Grammy Awards on December 12, 2012, but failed to win any of the awards at the ceremony in 2013.[2]

The accompanying music video was directed by Peter Zavadil and premiered on April 13, 2012 on Maxim.com.[3] The video features Eric Church playing instruments in a suburban neighborhood, while a couple is shown going through the ups and downs of a relationship.[4]

Composition[edit]

"Springsteen" features drums and a synthesizer, along with live instrumentation from the guitar and keyboard.[5] The song notably lacks both the fiddle and steel guitar, which are staples of country music.[6] Eric Church uses his voice throughout the piece to convey emotion, with his pitch and tone changing from verse to verse.[5] The song is composed of two verses with a chorus that is repeated several times.[5] It is in the key of D major with a main chord pattern of D-G-Bm-A and a vocal range of A3-E5.[7]

Eric Church wrote the song with Jeff Hyde and Ryan Tyndell.[5][8] The basis for the song came from a memory of a girl and involved another artist's song.[5] Church chose to base the song around an idol of his, Bruce Springsteen, whose career he admires.[6][9] During the course of the song, Church makes several allusions to Springsteen; he mentions the Springsteen songs Born to Run, Born in the USA, Glory Days, and I'm on Fire.[10] While being named after Springsteen and making several references to him, the song however tells the story of a teenage romance.[5][9]

Critical reception[edit]

"Springsteen" received critical acclaim from many music critics. Billy Dukes of Taste of Country gave the song five stars out of five, calling it "the best song from one of 2011's top country albums."[11] Matt Bjorke of Roughstock also gave the song five stars of five, writing that "the strong, sing-a-long lyrics and driving, percussive melody brings Eric Church to an accessibility that he's previously never had."[12] Noah Eaton of Country Universe gave it an A-, saying that it is "a gorgeous, bittersweet anthem-to-be that will likely leave even some more hardened hearts simultaneously smile and cry listening."[5] Eaton went on further to say that this song would propel Church's career to the next level.[5] American Songwriter chose the song for its Lyric of the Week feature, for the week of June 11, 2012.[13] The song was nominated for two Grammy AwardsBest Country Solo Performance and Best Country Song – on December 12, 2012, but failed to win any of the awards at the ceremony in 2013.[2]

Thom Jerek of Allmusic said the song had "a clever, if somewhat cloying, tune, but it gets the feeling across in spades."[14] The A.V. Club reviewer Steven Hyden claims that Church "is just as effective on slower, more thoughtful songs like "Springsteen" and that the song "[reflects] reflecting on music’s power to revive forgotten emotions from the past."[15] Bruce Springsteen himself took note of Church's music, specifically the song "Springsteen", and wrote Church a note on the back of a setlist.[6][16] Church received the letter from Springsteen's after a show on August 19, 2012.[16] In the note, Springsteen explained his and his family's love of the song and that he hoped to have their paths cross at some point.[16] Church was surprised when receiving the note and said that "it’s a long note, takes up the entire back page of this setlist for a show that lasted three hours and 47 minutes."[6]

Music video[edit]

The song's accompanying music video was directed by Peter Zavadil and premiered in April 13, 2012 on Maxim.com.[3][17] The video was later made available for purchase through iTunes on April 20, 2012.[18] The video is set in a suburban neighborhood located in Murfreesboro, Tennessee and work on the video began in early March 2012.[4][19] Church allowed all the neighborhood kids to make cameos in the film.[19] The video was later nominated for Music Video of the Year for 2012 Country Music Awards;[8][20] however, it lost out to Toby Keith's "Red Solo Cup" for the award.[21]

The music video begins with a girl talking about what she wants in her next boyfriend while on some bleachers.[20] After her monologue is over, the video cuts between shots of Eric Church and scenes of the girl and a boy during various high points and low points in their relationship.[20] Church is seen throughout the video either playing with his band in a garage, in the middle of the street on a piano, or walking through the streets with an American flag around his shoulders while singing.[19][20] The video ends without showing whether the girl and boy ended up together.[20]

Chart and sales performance[edit]

"Springsteen" debuted at number 52 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs chart for the week of February 18, 2012.[22] On June 23, 2012, it later became Eric Church's second number one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs after "Drink in My Hand" in 2011.[23] The record reached two million copies sold in January 2013 and became certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for that feat.[24] The song has sold 2,403,000 copies in the U.S. as of February 2014.[25]

On the Canadian Hot 100, the single reached a peak of 28 on the charts before falling down the rankings.[26] On September 5, 2012 sales for the song in Canada received gold and platinum certifications, and on July 11, 2013 it achieved double platinum status with over 80,000 records sold.[27]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Chart (2012–2013) Peak
position
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[28] 28
US Billboard Hot 100[29] 19
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[30] 1

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (2012) Position
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[26] 88
US Billboard Hot 100[31] 58
US Country Songs (Billboard)[32] 9

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Sales/shipments
Canada (Music Canada)[33] 2× Platinum 160,000^
United States (RIAA)[34] 2× Platinum 2,403,000[25]

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone
xunspecified figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conaway, Alanna (January 31, 2012). "Eric Church, ‘Springsteen’ – Lyrics Uncovered". Taste of Country. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "2013 Grammy Nominations". MTV. Viacom Networks Europe. December 6, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Maxim Staff (April 13, 2012). "Exclusive Premiere of Eric Church’s New Video". Maxim. Alpha Media Group Inc. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 13, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Music Video: Eric Church, "Springsteen"". K102. Clear Channel Media and Entertainment. April 16, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 14, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Eaton, Noah (January 29, 2012). "Single Review: Eric Church, "Springsteen"". Country Universe. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d Menconi, David (February 28, 2013). "Country singer Eric Church faces competition for Grammys". The News & Observer (The News & Observer Publishing Co.). Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2013. 
  7. ^ "'Springsteen' sheet music". MusicNotes.com. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved 9 August 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Celebrating 40 Years of the CMA Awards". Great American Country (Scripps Networks. LLC). Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Eric Church, 'Springsteen' Lyrics: Story Behind the Song". The Boot. February 8, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved May 15, 2012. 
  10. ^ Willman, Chris (February 28, 2013). "Eric Church's 'Springsteen,' Taylor Swift's 'Tim McGraw' and 19 More Song Titles That Name-Check Famous People". The Hollywood Reporter (Prometheus Global Media). Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2012. 
  11. ^ Dukes, Billy (January 30, 2012). "Eric Church, ‘Springsteen’ – Song Review". Taste of Country. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  12. ^ Bjorke, Matt (February 8, 2012). "Single Review: Eric Church - Springsteen". Roughstock. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  13. ^ Giles, Jeff (June 11, 2012). "Eric Church, "Springsteen"". Eric Church, “Springsteen”. American Songwriter. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  14. ^ Jurek, Thom. "Chief review". Allmusic. Retrieved July 26, 2011. 
  15. ^ Steven Hyden (August 16, 2011). "Eric Church". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2012. 
  16. ^ a b c Graff, Gary (August 22, 2012). "Eric Church Gets 'Incredible Note' From Bruce Springsteen". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2013. 
  17. ^ "CMT : Videos : Eric Church : Springsteen". Country Music Television. April 16, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Springsteen". Apple. April 20, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b c Cooper, Brittany Joy (March 9, 2012). "Eric Church Shoots ‘Springsteen’ Video in Tennessee Neighborhood". Taste of Country. Townsquare Media, LLC. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2013. 
  20. ^ a b c d e Shanka, Natashar (October 26, 2012). "Editor's video pick: Eric Church's 'Springsteen'". SheKnows. SheKnows, LLC. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Nominees & Winners". Great American Country (Scripps Networks. LLC). Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved February 9, 2013. 
  22. ^ Morris, Edward (February 11, 2012). "The Band Perry Hit No. 1 With "All Your Life"". Country Music Television. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved March 16, 2012. 
  23. ^ "Hot Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. June 23, 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved July 10, 2013. 
  24. ^ Paul Grein (January 9, 2013). "Week Ending Jan. 6, 2013: The First Top 10 Hit of 2013". Chart Watch (Yahoo Music). Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved January 9, 2013. 
  25. ^ a b Paul Grein. "Chart Watch: Taylor Swift Is 4 For 4 (Million)". Yahoo Music. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved February 19, 2014. 
  26. ^ a b "Best of 2012: Canadian Hot 100". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved January 7, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Gold Platinum Database". Music Canada. Music Canada. Retrieved July 7, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Eric Church Album & Song Chart History" Canadian Hot 100 for Eric Church.
  29. ^ "Eric Church Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Eric Church.
  30. ^ "Eric Church Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Eric Church.
  31. ^ "Best of 2012 - Hot 100 Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved July 7, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Best of 2012: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 2012. Archived from the original on 14 July 2013. Retrieved July 7, 2013. 
  33. ^ "Canadian single certifications – Eric Church – Springsteen". Music Canada. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  34. ^ "American single certifications – Eric Church – Springsteen". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved April 23, 2012.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Good Girl"
by Carrie Underwood
Billboard Hot Country Songs
number-one single

June 23–30, 2012
Succeeded by
"Drunk on You"
by Luke Bryan