Talk:Economic freedom

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index of economic freedom[edit]

Related? This might make a nice image addition to the page. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Index_of_Economic_Freedom_2009.png —Preceding unsigned comment added by 147.9.203.157 (talk) 15:53, 15 March 2010 (UTC)

Balance and attribution[edit]

As promised, I've added a US Supreme Court judgement as a source for some material I included which was then deleted by VT (impatient!). I've correspondingly deleted several unsourced and essayish pieces written in the encyclopedic voice - maybe they can be reintroduced with attribution to a source. Finally, I cut out the big picture and table and some text from the Index section, which largely reproduces Indices of dconomic freedom. The material made the article in unbalanced, both in terms of POV and in terms of the weight given to a statistical thinktank exercise at the expense of discussion of the issues.JQ (talk) 03:34, 11 October 2009 (UTC)

I don't see why you think that adding cherrypicked US court rulings is acceptable practice. Indices of economic freedom are most notable exponents of economic freedom and as such they deserve large section. If you wanted to cut something from the article you could have cut non-notable and blog criticisms of the indices. -- Vision Thing -- 11:21, 11 October 2009 (UTC)
This is absurd. Lochner is the most important US case on Freedom of Contract, and the decision of the Supreme Court overturning it was central to the evolution of debate on the issue. JQ (talk) 12:39, 11 October 2009 (UTC)
Interpretation of the court decision is OR (see WP:PRIMARY). I won't revert you for now but find a reliable secondary source that supports text you want to include. -- Vision Thing -- 14:48, 12 October 2009 (UTC)
VT, I've added a source for this standard point. which was clear from the text without any need for interpretation. But, I'm really tired of your constant wikilawyering, directed exclusively at material opposed to your preferred POV. The article as it was a year or so ago was one long violation of every wiki rule in the book, starting with WP:NPOV and you've consistently done your best to keep it that way. JQ (talk) 19:43, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

Proposed introduction[edit]

My proposed introduction:

Economic freedom is most commonly defined as the freedom to produce, trade and consume any goods and services acquired without the use of force, fraud or theft. This is embodied in the rule of law, property rights and freedom of contract, and characterized by external and internal openness of the markets, the protection of property rights and freedom of economic initiative.[1][2][3][4][5]

One major approach to measurement of economic freedom comes from the tradition emphasizing free markets and private property, while another extends the welfare economics study of individual choice, with greater economic freedom coming from a "larger" (in some technical sense) set of possible choices.[6] Indices of economic freedom attempt to measure (free market) economic freedom, and empirical studies based on these rankings have found them to be correlated with higher living standards, economic growth, income equality, less corruption and less political violence.[7][8][9][10][11]

As with freedom generally, there are various definitions, but no universally accepted concept of economic freedom.[12][13] Other conceptions of economic freedom include freedom from want[12][14] and the freedom to engage in collective bargaining.[15] Another more philosophical perspective emphasizes its context in distributive justice.[16]

Objections or suggestions? -- Vision Thing -- 11:27, 11 October 2009 (UTC)

I prefer the original and see little wrong with it. The first paragraph should note that there is no universally accepted definition, followed by a list of the commonly accepted definitions. Then only should it be followed by an exposition if the various positions. LK (talk) 14:44, 11 October 2009 (UTC)
The lead should reflect the body. Current lead doesn't do that. -- Vision Thing -- 14:49, 12 October 2009 (UTC)
Good point, that should be the principle. However, I think many here think the body is underweight alternative viewpoints. I guess when (or if) that is fixed we can revisit this. I'm going to edit the lead a bit towards your version, keeping the first sentence, but moving the discussion of alternatives down a bit, and trim a little. I'll post here first, to see if you like it, and if it's acceptable to the others. LK (talk) 16:14, 12 October 2009 (UTC)
If the following is acceptable to everyone, I'll post it. LK (talk) 16:41, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

Economic freedom is a term used in economic research and policy debates to discuss freedom in economic activities (such as production, consumption and trade). As with freedom generally, there are various definitions, but no universally accepted concept of economic freedom.[12][13][17] Today, the term is most commonly associated with a free market viewpoint, and defined as the freedom to produce, trade and consume any goods and services acquired without the use of force, fraud or theft. This approach comes from the classical libertarian tradition emphasizing free markets and private property, and is embodied in the rule of law, property rights and freedom of contract, and characterized by external and internal openness of the markets, the protection of property rights and freedom of economic initiative.[6][18][19]

Another major approach to economic freedom extends the welfare economics study of individual choice, with greater economic freedom coming from a "larger" (in some technical sense) set of possible choices.[6] Other conceptions of economic freedom include freedom from want[12][14] and the freedom to engage in collective bargaining.[15] More philosophical perspectives emphasize its context in distributive justice and basic freedoms of all individuals.[20]

Indices of economic freedom attempt to measure (free market) economic freedom, and empirical studies based on these rankings have found them to be correlated with higher living standards, economic growth, income equality, less corruption and less political violence.[21][22][23][24][25]

Clean Up[edit]

I would like to say that some of the discussion on this page is over 2 years old. Maybe some one can delete/archive some of this? --Sepero (talk) 17:21, 12 June 2010 (UTC)
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