Talk:Jambalaya

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Untitled[edit]

I cleaned up a couple details, fixed grammar problems, and gave the content better flow. -Anonymous

Plagiarism[edit]

The article in its present form is plagiarised from http://www.fabulousfeasts.com/cooking_classes.htm - which states in part for the recipe "Shrimp, Chicken and Sausage Jambalaya" that "Jambalaya is the name for a variety of rice-based dishes common in Louisiana Cajun cooking. It may derive from the Spanish dish paella, possibly brought to Louisiana when Spain controlled the territory comprising the future Louisiana Purchase, although many other theories exist, including the notion that it is a combination of the words jambon (French for ham), and ya-ya (West African for rice)."

There are also problems with the accuracy of the article's food anthropology basis. I will correct the same.

Because of the unoriginality of the article, I will substantially change the wording to avoid potential problems and reflect integrity in character and submisstions to Wikipedia. K. L. Bardon 03:28, 30 May 2006 (UTC)

I removed a reference to the use of roux. It wasn't clear if the original author understood the role of roux in dishes like gumbo and etouffe. Roux is not used in jambalaya. --Jdclevenger 20:41, 27 June 2006 (UTC)n

Casserole?[edit]

The following was added to the article but it has unencyclopedic style and it argues with another part of the article so I am moving it here. If the argument has merit then the article should be edited consistently to reflect this. Personally, I have no opinion as I know less than nothing about the subject. I just followed a vandal here one day and have had this article on my watchlist ever since. --DanielRigal 15:27, 14 July 2007 (UTC)

  • "Unable to edit the first bit of this entry, I'll just include as a subscript that no one in Louisiana has ever considered jambalaya like a casserole. Not once. And yes it is somewheat easier to prepare a simple jambalaya, but still difficult to perfect." - This was added to the main article by User:Mizzzzo.

"where it is known simply as"[edit]

The History section amusingly says that both Cajun and Red Jambalaya are called by the same name in New Orleans. Looks like sloppy copy-and-paste maybe. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.223.47.155 (talk) 20:36, 4 August 2008 (UTC)

Creole vs. Cajun[edit]

According to the article, Creole Jambalaya is much more common than Cajun Jambalaya. Is this referring to the world wide consumption of Jambalaya or just in Louisiana? In fact, brown Jambalaya is found pretty much everywhere except New Orleans, where the Creole is the most common... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.69.158.250 (talk) 23:51, 27 September 2010 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

Unless someone has clear evidence, just let the various possibilities stand on their own. Dueling assertions don't help. Another-sailor (talk) 17:09, 7 March 2011 (UTC)

The Provencal derivation makes sense. The others are fanciful at best, irresponsible etymology. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.134.20.241 (talk) 22:26, 29 April 2011 (UTC)

The etymology from the Oxford English Dictionary is from a reliable source. The other phony etymologies are phony. There is no need for the origin supported by well-researched eymologists to "duel" with basesless assertions. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 139.68.134.1 (talk) 21:19, 20 June 2013 (UTC)

Related to etymology: "There are some African languages in which “ay”, and “yaya” are words for certain grasses. “Ay” in the Wolof language refers to Echinochloa Pyramidalis, a weed grass that infests cultivated areas. “Yaya” in Kissi is another weed and pasture grass, Digitaria Horizontalis. Similar words such as “yayanga,” “yayángán,” and “yayagol” refer to other weed and fodder grasses in a variety of languages. Finally, “ya” in Mambila, and “y­­ā” or “yala” in Grusi-Lyela refer to the grain sorghum, sorghum bicolor (Burkhill, 1994. Vol II:224, 228, 235, 245, 248-254, 348-355, 632-633.) Though no one would confuse sorghum for rice, they are both edible grains. Thus, it is possible that through miscommunication between Louisianans and African slaves, the idea could have been started that “ya” meant “rice.”"[1] Zlatin zlatev (talk) 14:15, 2 September 2014 (UTC)

origins[edit]

Jambalaia (with that spelling) is also a provençal dish, made with chicken, rice and saffron (how original isn't it ?). You can found the recipe in some books of traditional provençal cuisine (I got one under my eyes at this very moment) and it is also described in the biggest provençal diccionary made by Frederic Mistral and published in the 19th century. I'd like to had this to the article since it seems thant Jambalaya wasn't at all created in Louisiana but was an importation at the beginning. It can also explains the origins of the word, of course. I don't think there is any possibility thant the same word appears in both very distant part of the world in order to describe pretty much the same dish.

Matieu Castel (talk) 20:52, 23 October 2014 (UTC)

  1. ^ Sigal, Andrew. "Jambalaya By Any Other Name". Retrieved 2 September 2014.