Talk:Komsomol

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Untitled[edit]

Sorry about the initial quality of this page. It was my first article, and I'd not got my wikipedia writing skills honed. In my opinion there are still big problems with this article, from my original text. Other authors have removed much of the mess, but I still think this needs much more work, and I would be cautious about using this information in its present form. My only hope is that creating this stub was a catalyst for the subsequent changes. In particular, the section on the end of Komsomol, whilst I still believe reflects the vast majority of opinion of causes of its demise needs to be objectified or explicitly subjectified and cited. Kaet

Komsomol leaders[edit]

The "Leaders" section seems to need a bit of work. Out of the four blue links it contains only two (Shelepin and Semichastny) seem to be correct. Given their tenure dates the other two (Sergei Pavlov and Aleksandr Kosarev) seem to be different persons. I doubt http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Pavlov could have been in office between 1959–1968; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Kosarev was born in 1977, so he probably wasn't head of the Komsomol in 1929–1938. I don't know anything about them or about the subject so I just thought I'd point it out to whoever wants to improve this article.Vincent Tep (talk) 16:43, 10 May 2012 (UTC)

Article needs much work[edit]

Particularly a huge role of Komsomol in labour activities should be presented in much more details. Photo of a member from the public domain should be present.

Transcription of Russian names is a general problem in Wiki. I looked it up in Britannica and other sources and found, that "ий" is usually transcribed as "y", not as "i", and "ё" should be "yo", not "io". Cmapm 13:53, 3 May 2005 (UTC)

-ий should be transcribed as -iy because it's actually two sounds both written and pronounced. Tradition to transliterate it as "-y" came from spelling of Polish surnames, where it is actually one sound.--Nixer 18:03, 13 May 2006 (UTC)

Current Komsomol[edit]

There is a currently existing Komsomol that is affiliated with the Communist Party of the Russian Federation. I would add info on it to this article, but I don't know much about it (beyond the fact that it is more radical than the parent party). --metzerly 03:54, 16 March 2006 (UTC)

There are several Komsomols in Russia today. The one currently tied to KPRF is SKMRF. --Soman 11:25, 14 August 2006 (UTC)

Is this image of the KOMSOMOL?[edit]

Is this image of the KOMSOMOL? See: http://www.alternativenation.net/gallery/files/1/6/8/7/933441955gas_2_original.jpg

(from http://www.altnation.com/forums/general-chat/82211-can-you-identify-picture.html )

I should also ask: is this image made using Photoshop? Cmapm 18:56, 30 May 2006 (UTC)

Komsomol[edit]

←I feel the komsomol should not be scrapped as Mikhail Gorbachev did.It could only be helped by resuscitating it and using it to build a stronger communist party.62.173.37.29 11:19, 14 August 2006 (UTC)

Bolsheviks and youth in 1917[edit]

The article incorrectly states that during 1917 the "Bolsheviks showed no interest in establishing or maintaining a youth wing." As Isabel Tirado demonstrates in "Young Guard!" (Greenwood, 1988), individual Bolsheviks played key roles in the establishment of youth organizations during the revolution. In Petrograd the Bolshevik I. D. Churgurin, the Vybord district leader, encouraged the organization of an independent youth organization (Trud i Svet) which demonstrated on May Day with 100,000 young workers. Also Krupskaia herself took an interest in this movement and agitated for the youth of Trud i Svet to reject its moderate leadership, and called upon the Bolshevik party to intervene in the organization. More importantly, the young Bolshevik Vasilii Alekseev succeeded in splitting the Trud i Svet group, creating the Socialist League of Young Workers (SSRM), which adopted Bolshevik positions and was later the most significant founding organization of the Komsomol.

I think that inclusion of some brief discussion of the youth organizations during the revolutionary period would do a lot to elucidate the origins of the Komsomol.

Cmrdian 07:18, 26 March 2007 (UTC)

Ukraine will celebrate the creation of komsomol[edit]

Celebration on the occasion of creation of komsomol of Ukraine will take place on June 26. Should this be mentioned in the article? — Mariah-Yulia (talk) 14:35, 3 April 2009 (UTC)


Name of the organization[edit]

I do not know of the others but definately, the term under "Hungarian" is not the name of the Soviet Komsomol. "KISZ" was the name of the youth organization of the Hungarian Communist Party (MSZMP), which was completely independent of the Soviet Komsomol, hence the title is wrong in this case. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.74.53.65 (talk) 12:44, 8 March 2011 (UTC)

Limited scope[edit]

The article is based on two publications, both of which a) seem to encompass only the 1920s before Stalin's time; and b) are biased: generalizations are made with the tendency to downplay Komsomol's efficiency and emphasize youth's interest in Western culture as natural and unavoidable. In this way Komsomol itself and its actions are marginalized, to look like feeble attempt to "control the rebellious youth".

No matter what the opinion on the topic, this is not the case. Numerous generations of young people were raised in USSR, and each of them was fully embedded in Soviet culture in their own way. Namely, the very next generation to the one described in this article, was exceptionally motivated, strong-willed and athletic (owing to the very real, booming popularity of state-suggested sports and military clubs, made even more popular by state heroization of polar explorers, generals (like Voroshilov), workmen and sportsmen); also, Komsomol played its role in dramatically raising education levels; the social mobility of "self-made men" of Stalin's era is ONE OF the defining features of that generation (that lived to fight the war and beyond).

Later, Komsomol became a very real power in its own rights, in part because it was responsible for a big share of entertainment industry; it exerted great influence on young students; and was an unavoidable "proving ground" for future bureaucrats and state officials.

All of that and much more is not touched upon in the article, thus I consider it very much lacking and not adequate to the subject. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 176.195.45.245 (talk) 11:24, 13 February 2012 (UTC)

Also, a solid majority of post-Soviet Russian officials, business owners and financiers, creative producers and media owners, sometimes even notorious criminal masterminds - come from Komsomol. To join VLKSM for an enterprising person was to open up a host of possibilities for social mobility and honing of management skills; in 80s, very real business opportunities also became a motivation. Komsomol allowed for various clandestine business models disguised as youth clubs or education projects. A lot of the new Russian rock also was promoted and financed via Komsomol quotas. Again, I am not an expert, but this all is common knowledge in Russia. I call out to experts with corresponding literature to expand the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 176.195.45.245 (talk) 11:35, 13 February 2012 (UTC)