Talk:Packard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject United States / Indiana / Ohio (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Indiana (marked as Low-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Ohio (marked as Mid-importance).
 
WikiProject Michigan / Detroit (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Michigan, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the U.S. state of Michigan on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Detroit task force.
 
WikiProject Automobiles (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Automobiles, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of automobiles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Companies (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Companies, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of companies on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Twin Six Era[edit]

There should be a distinct category for the twin six series of 1916-23. This was a time for Packard when they were literally the standard of the world. Cadillac introduced a V8 for 1914 and Packard trumped them with a V12 for 1916! Packard was a motoring pioneer in the early years and the twin six was the start of an evolution in the automobile. (Mystere485 (talk) 04:52, 6 February 2011 (UTC))


Success was with a six-cylinder[edit]

  • " Their early success was with a six-cylinder, copied by a certain British firm. "

There were many 'firms' from Britain. --Old Guard 18:58, 11 April 2006 (UTC)

"improve on the designs" of what?

This would be difficult to prove, anyway, as Packard had its first success with the 2-cylinder model F. The (Dominant" Sixes predecessors, Model 18 (series N, 1905-11) and model 30 (series U, 1906-11) were a huge success. Packard moved to its new, big factory long before the Six appeared. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 11:12, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

In case the "certain" British firm is Rolls-Royce: Their first six, the 40/50 h.p. (better known as the "Silver Ghost") was released in 1906. This engine remained in production with some modifications for New Phantom, and Phantom II, and was replaced by the V12 Phantom III in 1936. Packard introduced it's (Dominant) in 1912 and replaced it in 1915 withe Twin Six. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 11:42, 5 May 2011 (UTC)


Not Plastic in 1958

The 1958 Packard used fibreglass parts to restyle the front end and add fins, not plastic as stated in the article. The 1957-58 instrument panel was also fibreglass.

Of course, that's correct. I changed it in the article. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 10:02, 23 August 2010 (UTC)

Disambiguation[edit]

  • this needs a disambiguation link. there are lots of other things and people called Packard, and also places. 128.250.37.103 08:28, 1 June 2006 (UTC)
  • These museums seem important enough to have their own pages. Waarmstr 14:17, 1 August 2006 (UTC)
  • I live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where there is a "Packard Motor Car Building". I thought it was offices, but evidently it was a dealership. Are there other dealerships like these around the country? Is it worth having a list of dealerships that are still in existence? Waarmstr 14:17, 1 August 2006 (UTC)
There are many of them left in the USA - and we even have one here in Switzerland. packardinfo.com has a list. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 10:05, 23 August 2010 (UTC)

Six and the One-Ten[edit]

I changed the link which previously redirect "Packard Six" to "Packard One-Ten", as the later article has no information at all on the various models of pre-War Packard Six. -- Infrogmation 20:42, 18 November 2006 (UTC)

Timeline[edit]

It'd be nice to have a list of cars in order they were produced. In addition, it'd be good to have info about the first car to have a steering wheel. --Rhebus 11:07, 22 December 2006 (UTC)

Although I am not sure who invented the steering wheel for automotive application, Packard was among the first in the U.S. and worldwide, introducing it in the 1901 model C. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 11:15, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

First car that appeared as a regular model with a steering wheel was the Panhard & Levassor in 1898. It was engineered by Arthur Krebs--Chief tin cloud (talk) 18:44, 19 July 2011 (UTC)

Packard's leadership of the luxury car field was supreme.[edit]

Is this actually true? What about Cadillac, Dusenburg, Auburn, etc? I'm just asking in case someone knows, since this smells like NPOV to me. Mjl0509

Yes, that's a fact. Packard was the biggest luxury car builder worldwide in the 2nd half of the 20s. I still have to approve that it held a market share of over 50% in this segment of the market. Auburn built fine cars for sure, but most were middle-class models. Duesenberg, one of the best cars ever, was too expensive to produce larger quantities but that was never intended.

Cadillac took over in the 2nd half of the 30s when Packard built more cars but most of them were middle-class One-Ten and One-Twenty. Packard went further down-market after the war, thus giving up real competition to Cadillac. President Nance wanted to correct that, but it was too late.

I highly recommand this books about Packard's history: Packard, A History of the Motor Car and the Company - General edition - Beverly Rae Kimes, Editor – (1978) Automobile Quarterly", ISBN 0-915038-11-0

Ward, James A.: The Fall of the Packard Motor Car Company; University Press (September 1, 1995), ISBN 0804724571 --Chief tin cloud (talk) 11:25, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Bletchley Park[edit]

At the start of WWII, the UK's SIS Section VIII bought up the whole stock of the main UK dealer, Leonard Williams Ltd. These were modified to carry radio equipment for the Special Liaison Units (SLU) that were used for the transmission of Ultra traffic from Bletchley Park to commanders in the field. It is believed that they had at least seventy Packards.[1] --jmb (talk) 12:28, 22 July 2008 (UTC)

  1. ^ The Secret Wireless War: The story of MI6 Communications 1939-1945, Geoffrey Pidgeon, UPSO 2003, ISBN 1843752522

Request for identification[edit]

Packard ca 1940 in England 2008.jpg

Is anyone able to identify this Packard, please? I've no idea whether the image might be wiki-useful, but knowing what it is of would make a good start. And thank you. Regards Charles01 (talk) 21:11, 25 August 2008 (UTC)

After a certain amount of googling, I think it is probably a 1938 Packard Eight. Several of these cars seem to have accompanied the US army to the UK after FDR and the Japanese persuaded the US to enter the Hitler War on the side of the UK: I guess this is one that stayed behind in the UK after 1945. Further info or corrections welcome... Regards Charles01 (talk) 06:02, 13 October 2008 (UTC)

This is a 1939 Packard 1700 Six 4 Door Touring Sedan, body style 1282. Wheel covers do not look correct; at least they have wrong paint. Center hexagon is red, surrounded by two black rings; the inner is the background for the stamped script "Packard-Six". 1939 Packard models --Chief tin cloud (talk) 10:45, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Thank you. Regards. Charles01 (talk) 11:45, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Packard origin for Rolls-Royce - Bentley pushrod V-8?[edit]

I recently read a 'retrospective'-style article about a late-production Bentley Turbo R. It made the claim in an offhand manner that Rolls-Royce had found itself seriously outclassed under the bonnet both in output and cylinder count by the mid-50s, and the failure of Packard (last full year of production was '57, with a partial model year in '58) allowed them to buy the rights to a solid modern V-8 design reasonably. Thus, all pushrod Rolls-Royce and Bentley V-8s were derivative designs from Packard's OHV engine. This seems reasonable on the surface, as the first model year for the V-8 in the Silver Cloud II was '59. Can anyone substantiate this? --Darwinianphysicist (talk) 01:15, 6 October 2008 (UTC)

If you've $20 USD to spare, the answer could be in a book available on eBay. Item No. 320304875434, closing 26 Oct. Maybe the seller will look it up for you if asked nicely(:-) Bjenks (talk) 07:46, 6 October 2008 (UTC)

I think this link brings light into this story: RROC: "The Rolls-Royce V-8". The engineer who headed the RR V-8 project himself states that this design was RR's own work. Anyway, they had closer relationship to GM than to Packard, as they used an worked-over version of the Hydramatic for their cars. Further, neither my Packard- nor my RR-literature mentions such a deal and finally, there are enough technical differences beside the fact that both engines had an ohv V-8 layout. After all, I don't believe that Packard developed the RR V-8.

Definitely true is the fact that Packard sold V-8 engines: In 1955/56 a de-tuned 208 HP version of the 320 c.i. to AMC who was in lack of an own V-8 for the bigger Hudsons and Nashes, and in 1956 the 352 c.i. to corporate sister Studebaker for their Golden Hawk. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 09:41, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Random help[edit]

My father is the owner of a 1909 model 18 packard "touring" and a 1912 model 30 touring. I would be more than willing to provide photos of these cars, which prominently display the characteristic packard hubcaps, radiator, and crest. In addition, I am sure my father can provide any information that people feel is helpful for this article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 151.203.121.146 (talkcontribs) as of 16:23, July 21, 2009 (UTC)

Welcome to Wikipedia and please contribute to this article! Pictures can be uploaded into the Commons area, and specifically related to Packard vehicles. — CZmarlin (talk) 02:03, 22 July 2009 (UTC)


Packard Trucks[edit]

Packard trucks are mentioned in the article, but rather short and somewhat confusing. Production stopped in 1923, but mentioned is a building from 1926.

Perhaps, someone with knowledge about Packard trucks can add a chapter of its own --Chief tin cloud (talk) 09:45, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Packard non-automobile engines[edit]

Packard did much military work and also built engines for record cars, planes and boats. There is literature on that topic that I don't have, especially:

  • Neal, Robert J.: Master Motor Builders; Aero-Marine History Publishing Company; ISBN: 0-9647483-1-2
  • Neal, Robert J.: Packards at Speed; Aero-Marine History Publishing Company; ISBN: 0-9647483-0-4 —Preceding unsigned comment added by Chief tin cloud (talkcontribs) 10:27, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

1941-47 Clipper pictures[edit]

It's a shame but neither this article nor the Packard Clipper article have a picture of the 1941-47 Clipper. This car was not only important for the company but influental in American car styling, too. I coudn't find a fitting one... --62.12.228.76 (talk) 18:54, 23 October 2009 (UTC)

Packard model names[edit]

It's the old problem with Packard names: Inconsequent naming and numbering, giving the same name to different car lines and sometimes two designations for the same car...

I tried to give the Packard model chapter a somewhat better and logical structure. For example the above mentioned Packard Six: This designation was used three times: For a true luxury car (1912-1915), for a car at the lower end of the luxury field (1921-1928), and for a junior Packard (1937-1949). They have not technical relationship, they were made for different market segments with different production methods but all are Packard Sixes. Well, most of them, as thwe junior model sometimes was called the Six, the 110, the 115...

My system allows to learn the story of each model line in the way it was intended - even when the same product got different names. Every model is easy to find (by name or by model year), and it is no longer necessary to switch between pages that in reality belong together. Until now, I did this with Single cylinder models, twins, sixes, and V-12s. Eights and post war cars will follow soon. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 19:29, 6 October 2010 (UTC)

Bring together 250 series, Mayfair, and Pacific[edit]

Model line consisted on a hardtop and a convertible on the short (122 in.) chassis. Although it rose from a junior to a senior model, all of them in fact are close relatives. Their story should be told together... --Chief tin cloud (talk) 19:29, 6 October 2010 (UTC)


"Ask the Man Who Owns One"[edit]

Macauley was also responsible for the iconic Packard slogan, "Ask the Man Who Owns One." That has to become proved. In Packard, A History of the Motor Car and the Company - mentioned above - the theory rises that the slogan was introduced after Packard did very well in a reliability run in 1901. Oldest known Packard ad with this slogan dates from 1902 and is illustrated in that book. --Chief tin cloud (talk) 11:42, 5 May 2011 (UTC)

Packard and Hewlett-Packard[edit]

Should it be mentioned that there is no connection between Hewlett-Packard and Packard Motors?

I have heard it often mentioned that this is a subject of much confusion.Sunshine Warrior04 (talk) 07:44, 13 December 2011 (UTC)

The distinction is clearly placed at the top of the article. Right at the start of the article is the following sentence (with clickable links) "For people named Packard, see Packard (surname). For computer company, see Hewlett Packard." Thus, there should be no confusion. Anyone that starts to read the article is thus well informed that it is not about other people named "Packard", nor is it about a computer company whose name begins with "Hewlett". Moreover, there is no need to repeat this "disclaimer" notice within the body of the article whose subject is the historic automobile marque built by the Packard Motor Car Company. CZmarlin (talk) 15:58, 13 December 2011 (UTC)

Oldest Packard[edit]

It is correct that J. W. Packard donated his Model A Packard to Lehigh University. As this is the only of the built that survives, this cars is the one exhibited by the Packard Museum in Warren OH. All model A's were built between September and December, 1899.--Chief tin cloud (talk) 19:11, 22 March 2012 (UTC)