Time Takes Time

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Time Takes Time
Original album artwork by Mark Ryden
Studio album by Ringo Starr
Released 22 May 1992 (US)
29 June 1992 (UK)
Recorded March–September 1991, February 1992
Genre Rock
Length 40:04
Label Private Music
Producer Don Was, Jeff Lynne, Peter Asher, Phil Ramone
Ringo Starr chronology
Ringo Starr and His All-Starr Band
(1990)
Time Takes Time
(1992)
Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band Volume 2: Live from Montreux
(1993)
Singles from Time Takes Time
  1. "Weight of the World"
    Released: 28 April 1992 (US); 18 May 1992 (UK)
  2. "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go"
    Released: 21 September 1992 (Germany only)

Time Takes Time is the tenth studio album by Ringo Starr, released in 1992, his critically acclaimed comeback album. His first studio album since 1983's Old Wave, it followed a successful 1989–90 world tour with his All-Starr Band. Time Takes Time features several celebrity guests including Brian Wilson, Harry Nilsson and Electric Light Orchestra frontman Jeff Lynne.

Background[edit]

In February 1987, Ringo Starr started work on his first new studio album in four years. Sessions began with producer Chips Moman in 3 Alarm Studios in Memphis, Tennessee.[1][2] These sessions lasted for a few days then came to a halt[1] before being resumed in April, with recording taking place at 3 Alarm Studios and Sun Studios.[nb 1][2] A month-long string of recording sessions were planned in August, for recording at Mayfair Recording Studios in London, before being halted shortly before recording had begun.[1] These sessions were to have been handled by Elton John's manager, John Reid, and were intended to feature John.[1] While on tour in July 1989 with the All-Starr Band, Starr was told that Moman was attempting to release the Memphis sessions as an album;[3] Starr proceeded to sue Moman in August.[1] An injunction was issued by the Fulton County Superior Courts to Starr in early January 1990, where he was to pay out costs of the sessions to Moman.[1] It was announced at a National Association of Radio Merchandisers (NARM) convention[4] that Starr signed a recording contract with Private Music in March 1991,[1] who seemed to be the only label interested in him at the time.[5]

Recording[edit]

Starr had initially intended to trial four producers and select the best to record the whole album with: "because it's been so long for me that I didn't really know any producers I wanted to go with for the whole record. So I figured I'd try a few people."[5] Aligning himself with top producers Don Was, Peter Asher, Phil Ramone and Jeff Lynne, the album was recorded sporadically between March and September 1991, and finished in February 1992.[1] Jim Horn, who plays all the saxophone parts on the album, previously worked on Starr's Ringo (1973).[6] The material was written predominantly by outside writers, with Starr co-writing three songs. Time Takes Time also marked Starr's first alliance with Mark Hudson, at the time Hudson assisted in vocal arrangements on some of the Ramone-produced tracks.[nb 2][6]

In April 1991, Starr helped record with fellow label artist, Taj Mahal, on his album.[1] Lynne and Starr recorded four songs between 20 and 31 May: "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go", "After All These Years", "Don't Be Cruel", and "Call Me".[7] Lynne later remixed "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go" at Ocean Way Studios.[7] Starr contributed the song "You'll Never Know", recorded on 14 September at the tail-end of the album sessions, to the soundtrack to film Curly Sue.[1] "Weight of the World" was recorded in February 1992 in Los Angeles.[1] Starr recorded the Ramone-composition "All in the Name of Love", "Runaways", and another song called "All in the Name of Love", written by Jerry Lynn William, with Ramone.[8] With Asher, Starr recorded "Thank You for Being a Friend", written by Andrew Gold, The Posies' "Golden Blunders", and a Paul McCartney–Starr song, "Angel in Disguise".[8] Was' sessions were backed by a group of musicians: Benmont Tench on keyboard, Mark Goldenberg on guitar and Bonnie Raitt's on bass.[8] With Was, Starr recorded the Diane Warren–written song, "In a Heartbeat" and "Weight of the World", featuring Brian Wilson, and Jellyfish, on backing vocals respectively.[8]

Several tracks were left off the album.[9] The McCartney song entitled "Angel in Disguise",[1] to which Starr added a verse, has not been released.[nb 3][9] Starr covered "Don't Be Cruel" but it was left off the album[10] and was issued as the B-side of the "Weight of the World" CD single[11] but was included on the Japanese edition of the album.[12] Another outtake, "Everyone Wins",[1] was issued in Germany as the B-side of the "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go" single.[7] Three more outtakes that were never released were "Thank You for Being a Friend",[1] Ramone-produced "Love Is Going to Get You",[nb 4][13] and the Lynne-produced "Call Me".[1] Lynne said that "Call Me" would never be released,[14] which Tom Petty appears on.[14] Although Starr recorded and released another song entitled "Call Me", it bears no resemblance to the Lynne-produced number.[14]

Release[edit]

Starr released an announcement about the album, the single "Weight of the World", and an All-Starr tour, on 28 February 1992.[15] On 2 April, Starr held a press conference, stating the same three things, and in addition, tour dates,[15] at Radio City Music Hall in New York.[1] From 3 April, onwards for a few days, Starr made TV and radio appearances to promote both the album and the tour.[1] On the same day, promotional copies of the "Weight of the World" single were sent to radio stations in the US.[15] Filming a music video for "Weight of the World" started on 16 May, and was finished the next day.[16] CNN broadcast a behind-the-scenes report on making the video on 18 May.[1] Starr performed the song, with his All-Starr band as backing musicians, on the TV show Arsenio.[16] The "Weight of the World" single was released on 28 April in the US,[nb 5] and on 18 May in the UK.[nb 6][19]

Time Takes Time was released in the US on 22 May,[nb 7] and in the UK on 29 June, by Private Music.[nb 8][20] Starr mentioned he hasn't "been this happy with an album since Ringo in 1973. It's time I stretched.", despite this, the album had failed to chart.[8] While a planned single release on 3 July in the US of "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go", backed with "Everyone Wins", was shelved,[21] a CD edition of the single managed to get released in Germany on 21 September.[nb 9][12] The 7" vinyl edition of the single was also released in Germany and had "Don't Know a Thing About Love" as the B-side, released on the same day.[nb 10][12] Starr again appeared on Arsenio on 21 October, being interviewed and then performing "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go" and "Act Naturally".[22] Times Takes Time was released on vinyl only in Mexico, Brazil, Spain and Germany.[nb 11] Despite an All-Starr tour in 1992 to promote the album,[1] Time Takes Time would be Starr's only album with Private Music before he was dropped from their roster.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4.5/5 stars[23]
MusicHound 2/5 stars[24]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[25]

Well-received upon release, many critics considered Time Takes Time Starr's best album since 1973's Ringo. Rolling Stone magazine wrote, "The drummer's most consistent, wide-awake album since Ringo, from 1973".[25] The release was met with some indifference by the public however, and thus failed to chart. Lead single "Weight of the World" managed to reach number 74 in the UK.[26]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Producer(s) Length
1. "Weight of the World"   Brian O'Doherty, Fred Velez Don Was 3:54
2. "Don't Know a Thing About Love"   Richard Feldman, Stan Lynch Was 3:49
3. "Don't Go Where the Road Don't Go"   Richard Starkey, Johnny Warman, Gary Grainger Jeff Lynne 3:20
4. "Golden Blunders" (The Posies cover) Jonathan Auer, Kenneth Stringfellow Peter Asher 4:06
5. "All in the Name of Love"   Jerry Lynn Williams Phil Ramone 3:42
6. "After All These Years"   Starkey, Warman Lynne 3:10
7. "I Don't Believe You"   Andy Sturmer, Roger Manning Was 2:48
8. "Runaways"   Starkey, Warman Ramone 4:51
9. "In a Heartbeat"   Diane Warren Was 4:29
10. "What Goes Around"   Rick Suchow Was 5:50
Japanese edition bonus track
No. Title Writer(s) Producer(s) Length
11. "Don't Be Cruel" (Elvis Presley cover, b-side to "Weight of the World" single) Otis Blackwell, Elvis Presley Lynne 2:08

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per booklet.[27]

Production

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ Among the total of 16 songs recorded, some include: "Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day", "Some Kind of Wonderful", "Beat Patrol", "Ain't That a Shame", "Whiskey and Cola", and "I Can Help".[1]
  2. ^ Starr and Hudson would later work together on Vertical Man (1998), VH1 Storytellers (1998), I Wanna Be Santa Claus (1999), and Ringo Rama (2003), among others.[6]
  3. ^ Being interviewed by a Toronto Sun reporter on 25 October, McCartney said that "Ringo wanted an extra verse, so I said, 'Let's write the extra verse together. Or you can just write it and we'll have co-written the song.' I understand he has written a third verse. If it's another 'With A Little Help From My Friends', great, if it isn't, great!"[1]
  4. ^ Ramone commented that the song was "great [...] but it did not fit with the character of the songs he did" so far.[13]
  5. ^ US Private Music 01005-81003-2[17]
  6. ^ 7": UK Private Music 115,392; CD: UK Private Music 665,392[18]
  7. ^ US Private Music 01005-82097-2[20]
  8. ^ UK Private Music 262 902[5]
  9. ^ "Everyone Wins" was mistitled as "Everybody Wins".[12]
  10. ^ CD: Germany Private Music 74321 11369 2; 7" vinyl: Germany Private Music 74321 11369 7[12]
  11. ^ Starr's following albums weren't released on vinyl until Y Not (2010).
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Miles, Barry; Badman, Keith, ed. (2001). The Beatles Diary After the Break-Up: 1970–2001 (reprint ed.). London: Music Sales Group. ISBN 9780711983076. 
  2. ^ a b Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 247. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  3. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 248. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  4. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 272. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  5. ^ a b c Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 334. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  6. ^ a b c Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 216. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  7. ^ a b c Porter, Robert. "Jeff Lynne Song Database – 1990s Songs". Jefflynnesongs.com. Retrieved 28 February 2013.  Scroll down to the section header Miscellaneous production sessions 1991 & 1992 click Don't Go Where The Road Don't Go then click Single/Album Version.
  8. ^ a b c d e Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 335. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  9. ^ a b Clayson, Alan "Ringo Starr: Straight Man Or Joker", Sanctuary Publishing, Ltd. 1998 p.334
  10. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 186. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  11. ^ Porter, Robert. "Jeff Lynne Song Database – 1990s Songs". Jefflynnesongs.com. Retrieved 28 February 2013.  Scroll down to the section header Miscellaneous production sessions 1991 & 1992 click After All These Years then click Album Version.
  12. ^ a b c d e Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 187. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  13. ^ a b Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 275. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  14. ^ a b c Porter, Robert. "Jeff Lynne Song Database – 1990s Songs". Jefflynnesongs.com. Retrieved 28 February 2013.  Scroll down to the section header Miscellaneous production sessions 1991 & 1992 click Call Me then click Unreleased Studio Recording.
  15. ^ a b c Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 141. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  16. ^ a b Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 142. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  17. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 184. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  18. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 183. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  19. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. pp. 183, 184. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  20. ^ a b Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 185. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  21. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 143. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  22. ^ Harry, Bill (2004). The Ringo Starr Encyclopedia. London: Virgin Books. p. 146. ISBN 9780753508435. 
  23. ^ Time Takes Time at AllMusic
  24. ^ Gary Graff & Daniel Durchholz (eds), MusicHound Rock: The Essential Album Guide, Visible Ink Press (Farmington Hills, MI, 1999; ISBN 1-57859-061-2), pp. 1082–83.
  25. ^ a b Puterbaugh, Parke (6 August 1992). "Ringo Starr: Time Takes Time : Music Reviews". rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on 2 October 2007. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  26. ^ Calkin, Graham. "Ringo Starr – Weight of the World". Jpgr.co.uk. Retrieved 9 February 2013. 
  27. ^ Time Takes Time (Booklet). Ringo Starr. Private Music. 1992. 262902. 

External links[edit]