UC Riverside Highlanders baseball

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UC Riverside Highlanders
Founded: 1958; 56 years ago (1958)
UC Riverside Highlanders athletic logo

University University of California, Riverside
Conference Big West
Location Riverside, CA
Head Coach Troy Percival (1st year)
Home Stadium Riverside Sports Complex
(Capacity: 2,500)
Nickname Highlanders
Colors

Blue and Gold

            
National Championships
Division II: 1977, 1982
College World Series Appearances
Division II: 1977, 1981, 1982, 1991
NCAA Tournament Appearances
Division II: 1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999
Division I: 2003, 2007
Conference Champions
CCAA: 1977, 1981, 1982, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996
Big West: 2007

The UC Riverside baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball team of the University of California, Riverside, located in Riverside, California, United States. The program has been a member of the NCAA Division I Big West Conference since the start of the 2002 season. The program's home venue is the Riverside Sports Complex, located on the university's campus. Alumnus and former major leaguer Troy Percival was named the program's head coach ahead of the 2015 season. The program has won two Division II national championships. It has appeared in four Division II College World Series and 12 NCAA Tournaments (two in Division I). It has won eight California Collegiate Athletic Association championships and one Big West Conference championship. As of the start of the 2013 Major League Baseball season, 16 former Highlanders have appeared in Major League Baseball.

History[edit]

Although the school traces its history to the early 20th century, the University of California, Riverside opened for classes in February 1954.[1] It adopted the Highlanders nickname in a student election held later that year.[2] The varsity baseball program was founded shortly thereafter, beginning play in 1958.[3]

Division II[edit]

Little record exists of the program's early years, though it competed as an Independent in the NCAA College Division (made up of small-school athletic programs) through the end of the 1970 season.[3] Don Edwards, who had assisted in the development of the program prior to its first season, became the program's second head coach prior to the 1960 season.[4] From 1965–1968, future UC Irvine and UCLA head coach Gary Adams was an assistant coach under Edwards.[5]

On September 2, 1970, John Lowenstein became the first program alumnus to appear in Major League Baseball, as he debuted for the Cleveland Indians. Lowenstein went on to have a 16-year major league career.[6][7][8] While at UC Riverside, Lowenstein had become the first athlete in school history to be awarded an athletic scholarship.[4]

Prior to the start of the 1971 season, the program joined the College Division's California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA). It finished well below .500 in its first three seasons in the league.[3] In August 1973, the NCAA reorganized its divisions. Prior to then, the NCAA had competed in two divisions, a large-school University Division and a small-school College Division. Following the reorganization, the University Division became Division I, while the College Division split into Division II and Division III. UC Riverside became a Division II Independent.[9]

Also following the 1973 season, Emporia State coach Jack Smitheran was hired as the program's third head coach. The team's play improved soon after his hiring. In 1975, the Highlanders appeared in their first Division II NCAA Tournament. In the West Regional, the team defeated Chapman, 9-8, before being eliminated by Cal State Northridge, 8-1.[3]

In 1977, the program returned to the NCAA Tournament and won the Division II National Championship. After winning the CCAA with a 15-9 conference record, the team earned a berth in the West Regional. After advancing through the West Regional with wins over Cal State Northridge and Cal State Hayward, the program played in the Division II College World Series. There, it went 5-1, defeating Eckerd 4-1 in the championship game.[3][10] Future major leaguers Steve Lubratich and Eric Show played on the championship team.[6]

The Highlanders' home venue, the Riverside Sports Complex, hosted the Division II College World Series from 1980–1984.[11] The team qualified for two World Series played on its home field. In 1981, the team won the West Regional, but was eliminated after losing consecutive World Series games to Florida Southern and Cal State Northridge.[12] In 1982, the team again qualified for the NCAA Tournament and won the West Regional. In the World Series, the Highlanders won their second Division II National Championship with victories over Longwood, New Haven, and Florida Southern twice.[3] Future major leaguer Calvin Jones played on the 1982 team.[6]

For the seven straight seasons from 1983–1989, the program failed to qualify for the NCAA Tournament, despite finishing with an above-.500 CCAA record in six of the seven years. In the 1990s, however, the team qualified for seven NCAA Tournaments (1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999). On one occasion, in 1991, it advanced to the Division II College World Series, the program's fourth appearance. After losing to SIU Edwardsville in its first game, the team won consecutive games over Shippensburg, SIU Edwardsville, and Jacksonville State. In the championship game, however, the team lost to Jacksonville State 5-2.[3] In 1995, the Highlanders entered the West Regional finals with a 43-15 record, but were upset by UC Irvine, which had entered the game at 29-30.[13][14]

Division I[edit]

In February 2000, UC Riverside announced that it would move to Division I in the 2000-2001 academic year and join the Big West Conference in the 2001-2002 academic year.[15] After spending the 2001 season as an Independent, the baseball program played its first Big West season in 2002.[3]

Troy Percival, while pitching for the MLB's St. Louis Cardinals in 2007.

Compared to many of the school's other athletic programs, the baseball program transitioned successfully to Division I.[16] Beginning in 2002, it had an above-.500 overall record in six consecutive Division I seasons. In 2003, the Highlanders finished third in the Big West and received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament. As the #3 seed in the Palo Alto Regional, the team beat Richmond 10-8 in its opening game. It was then eliminated after losing consecutive games to regional host Stanford and Richmond.[3][17]

Following the 2004 season, Jack Smitheran retired as the program's head coach.[18] In 31 seasons, Smitheran had a record of 974-729-3 and won two Division II National Championships.[3] Following his retirement, Smitheran worked for the Seattle Mariners as a scouting advisor.[19] He had been inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2002, the UC Riverside Hall of Fame in 2004, and had his number #2 retired by the program in 2006.[20] He was replaced by Doug Smith, who had been an assistant coach with the program since the 1983 season.[3]

Prior to the 2007 season, an unused storage building near the Riverside Sports Complex was renovated and converted into the team's home clubhouse. Program alumnus Troy Percival both paid for the improvements and renovated the building himself.[21]

In the 2007 season, the team went 38-21 and won the Big West title, thus receiving an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament as a #2 seed in the Tempe Regional. As in 2003, the team won its opening game, 10-5, against Nebraska. It then lost consecutive games to Arizona State and Nebraska and was eliminated.[17][22]

Smith coached the team through the end of the 2014 season, when he retired. In that seven-year stretch, the program had three winning seasons and finished as high as third in the Big West; it did not qualify for the postseason. In his ten years as head coach, Smith had a record of 282-264. Percival replaced him.[23]

Conference affiliations[edit]

Venues[edit]

Riverside Sports Complex[edit]

The program's home venue is the Riverside Sports Complex, located on the university's campus. The facility was renovated in 2007 and has a capacity of 2,500 spectators. In addition to hosting the Highlanders, it hosted the Division II College World Series from 1980–1984. It has also been the home venue of minor league baseball teams, hosting the Riverside Red Wave (1988–1990) and the Riverside Pilots (1993–1995).[11][21]

Head coaches[edit]

Jack Smitheran, who coached for 31 seasons and won 974 games, is the program's longest-tenured and most successful coach.


Year(s) Coach Seasons W-L-T Pct
1958–1959 Unknown 2 9-4[24] .692
1960–1973 Don Edwards 14 67-145-4[24] .316
1974–2004 Jack Smitheran 31 974-729-3 .572
2005–2014 Doug Smith 10 282-264 .516
2015–present Troy Percival 0 0-0 .000
TOTALS
4 57 1330-1142-7[24] .538

Current coaching staff[edit]

  • Head coach – Troy Percival [25]
  • Assistant coach – Bryson Leblanc
  • Volunteer assistant coach – Andy Lozano

Yearly records[edit]

Below is a table of the program's yearly records.[3][4][22][26][27]

Season Coach Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Independent (College Division)[24] (1958–1970)
1958 Unknown 9-4
1959 Unknown
1960 Don Edwards
1961 Don Edwards
1962 Don Edwards
1963 Don Edwards
1964 Don Edwards
1965 Don Edwards
1966 Don Edwards
1967 Don Edwards
1968 Don Edwards 17-23
1969 Don Edwards 17-25
1970 Don Edwards 2-8[24]
Independent: 45-60[24]
California Collegiate Athletic Association (College Division/Division II) (1971–2000)
1971 Don Edwards 17-26-2 7-16-1
1972 Don Edwards 17-30 7-17
1973 Don Edwards 17-33-2 6-17-1
1974 Jack Smitheran 16-28 6-13
1975 Jack Smitheran 26-24 West Regional
1976 Jack Smitheran 26-23 7-11
1977 Jack Smitheran 43-19 15-9 College World Series
1978 Jack Smitheran 22-31 10-11
1979 Jack Smitheran 33-27-1
1980 Jack Smitheran 28-21 13-14
1981 Jack Smitheran 39-23 17-13 College World Series
1982 Jack Smitheran 36-23 19-10 College World Series
1983 Jack Smitheran 31-24 19-11
1984 Jack Smitheran 28-29-1 16-14
1985 Jack Smitheran 28-25 18-12
1986 Jack Smitheran 30-22 17-12
1987 Jack Smitheran 29-23 18-12
1988 Jack Smitheran 29-25 17-13
1989 Jack Smitheran 25-27-1 14-15-1
1990 Jack Smitheran 39-18 21-9 West Regional
1991 Jack Smitheran 38-25-1 18-12 College World Series
1992 Jack Smitheran 34-23 20-10 West Regional
1993 Jack Smitheran 22-31 14-16
1994 Jack Smitheran 41-21 18-12 West Regional
1995 Jack Smitheran 43-16 24-8 West Regional
1996 Jack Smitheran 43-14 25-7 West Regional
1997 Jack Smitheran 39-15 20-12
1998 Jack Smitheran 22-27 14-17
1999 Jack Smitheran 30-21 21-15 West Regional
2000 Jack Smitheran 30-23 25-13
CCAA: 921-717-8 446-351-3[24]
Independent (Division I) (2001–2001)
2001 Jack Smitheran 19-35
Big West Conference (2002–present)
2002 Jack Smitheran 30-28 10-14 6th
2003 Jack Smitheran 41-17 14-7 3rd Palo Alto Regional
2004 Jack Smitheran 33-24 11-10 3rd
2005 Doug Smith 28-27 11-10 4th
2006 Doug Smith 29-25 9-12 t-5th
2007 Doug Smith 38-21 16-5 1st Tempe Regional
2008 Doug Smith 21-33 14-10 t-3rd
2009 Doug Smith 33-20 12-12 4th
2010 Doug Smith 32-23 13-11 3rd
2011 Doug Smith 29-23 11-13 5th
2012 Doug Smith 22-32 9-15 8th
2013 Doug Smith 22-32 10-17 8th
2014 Doug Smith 26-28 12-12 T-5th
Big West: 384-333 152-148
Total: 1369-1145-8[24]

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Notable former players[edit]

The following is a list of notable former Highlanders and the seasons in which they played for the program.[3][6]

Marc Rzepczynski, while pitching for the MLB's St. Louis Cardinals.

2012 MLB Draft[edit]

One Highlander was selected in the 2012 Major League Baseball Draft. P Eddie Orozco, selected in the 22nd round by the Chicago Cubs, chose to sign a professional contract.[28][29]

2013 MLB Draft[edit]

Two Highlanders were selected in the 2013 Major League Baseball Draft. The Cleveland Indians selected P Trevor Frank in the 8th round, and the Pittsburgh Pirates selected P Jacob Smigelski in the 39th round. Frank signed with Cleveland, while Smigelski chose to return to Riverside for his senior season.[30][31][32][33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History". UCR.edu. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  2. ^ "School Spirit". UCR.edu. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "2010 UC Riverside Highlanders Baseball Media Guide". UC Riverside Sports Information. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c "Athletics Hall of Fame Class of 2011 Slated for Induction September 17". GoHighlanders.com. UC Riverside Sports Information. June 22, 2011. Archived from the original on December 20, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  5. ^ "#13 Gary Adams". UCLABruins.com. UCLA Sports Information. Archived from the original on December 20, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d "University of California, Riverside Baseball Players Who Made it to the Major Leagues". Baseball-Almanac.com. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  7. ^ "John Lowenstein". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  8. ^ Grimsley, Will (October 3, 1979). "Lowly Sub Lowenstein Most Unplausible Hero". Sarasota Journal (Sarasota, Florida, USA). p. 3B. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  9. ^ Liska, Jerry (August 7, 1973). "NCAA Splits Into Three Divisions". The Portsmouth Times (Portsmouth, Ohio, USA). The Associated Press. p. 8. Archived from the original on August 12, 2012. Retrieved August 12, 2012. 
  10. ^ Chick, Bob (June 2, 1977). "Itching for a Title". The Evening Independent (St. Petersburg, Florida, USA). p. 3B. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  11. ^ a b "Riverside Sports Complex". GoHighlanders.com. UC Riverside Sports Information. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  12. ^ "All-Time Results". NCAA Division II Baseball Record Book. NCAA. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  13. ^ "UCD, Riverside Both Eye Alabama". Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, California, USA). May 21, 1995. p. C8. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Reserve Clears Bases; UCD Stuns Riverside". Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, California, USA). May 22, 1995. p. D1. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  15. ^ "UCR Invited to Join Big West Conference, Clearing Major Hurdle in Division I Bid". UCR.edu. February 9, 2000. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  16. ^ Steele, Allan (September 18, 2010). "Tough 10 Years for UCR". PE.com. The Press-Enterprise. Retrieved December 19, 2012. "Even as a Division II program, the Highlanders baseball team had been competitive against Division I teams, so its transition was nearly seamless. Other programs have not been as competitive." 
  17. ^ a b "All-Time Results". NCAA Division I Baseball Record Book. NCAA. pp. 9–17. Archived from the original on December 17, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Smitheran Retires After 31 Years as UC Riverside Coach". USAToday.com (Associated Press). September 2, 2004. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  19. ^ Morosi, Jon Paul (November 3, 2005). "Mariners Notebook: Gillick Leaves Void in M's Front Office". SeattlePi.com. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Jack Smitheran Named to ABCA Hall of Fame". UCR.edu. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  21. ^ a b Shaikin, Bill (February 12, 2007). "Percival Delivers New Home Base". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  22. ^ a b "Big West Conference Baseball Record Book". Big West Conference. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  23. ^ "Baseball: UCR's Smith Stepping Down". The Press Enterprise. Archived from the original on 2012-06-04. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h Records incomplete.
  25. ^ Steele, Allan. "BASEBALL: Percival to be named UCR's new coach". The Press Enterprise. The Press Enterprise. Retrieved 29 July 2014. 
  26. ^ "All-Time CCAA Champions". GoCCAA.com. California Collegiate Athletic Association. Archived from the original on December 18, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2012. 
  27. ^ "2013 Big West Conference Baseball Standings". D1Baseball.com. Jeremy Mills. Archived from the original on May 28, 2013. Retrieved May 28, 2013. 
  28. ^ "2012 MLB Draft by School: T-Z". CollegeBaseballInsider.com. Archived from the original on December 17, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2012. 
  29. ^ "Chicago Cubs 2012 Draft Selection". Chicago Cubs. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Cleveland Indians 2013 Draft Selections". Archived from the original on June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014. 
  31. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates 2013 Draft Selections". Archived from the original on June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014. 
  32. ^ "2014 UC Riverside Highlanders Baseball Roster". GoHighlanders.com. UC Riverside Sports Information. Archived from the original on June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014. 
  33. ^ Lastoria, Tony. "2013 Indians 8th Round Pick: RHP Trevor Frank". IndiansBaseballInsider.com. Archived from the original on June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014.