Whittling

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Whittling knife rounding a corner (filet) of a piece of wood.

Whittling may refer either to the art of carving pleasing shapes[clarification needed] out of raw wood using only a knife or it may refer to a time occupying, non-artistic, reduction process of repeatedly shaving slivers from a piece of wood.[1]:14[2]:10[3]:30

Background[edit]

Casual whittling is typically performed with a light, small-bladed knife, usually a pocket knife.

Specialized whittling or carving knives

Specialized whittling knives, with fixed single blades, are preferred for sculpting artistic work. They have thick handles which are easier to grip for long periods, allowing more precise control and pressure.

Occasionally the terms "whittling" and "carving" are used interchangeably, but they are different arts. Carving employs the use of chisels, gouges, and a mallet, while whittling involves only the use of a knife.[2]:10 Carving frequently involves powered equipment such as lathes.

In industrialized areas of the world, whittling is mainly a hobby and not an occupational activity as it was before powered wood working equipment enabled modern production.

"Splash whittling" is a historical, decorative technique in Norway using an ax to create a herringbone pattern.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, Harold B. (1996). Democracy and the Work Place. Black Rose Books. ISBN 978-0919618220. 
  2. ^ a b Tangerman, E. J. (1962). Whittling and Woodcarving. Dover. ISBN 978-0486209654. 
  3. ^ Hunt, Lester I. (1979). "Pocketknife Art". Design For Arts in Education 81 (1): 30–33. doi:10.1080/07320973.1979.9939989. 
  4. ^ THUN, TERJE; STORSLETTEN, OLA (2011). "Out of fashion and out of mind; some puzzles in building history solved by means of dendrochronology". Stavanger. Retrieved 4 January 2014. 

External links[edit]