World Universities Debating Championship in Spanish

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The World Universities Debating Championship in Spanish or Campeonato Mundial Universitario de Debate en Español (CMUDE) is the world's largest and most important debating tournament in Spanish.

It is a parliamentary debating event, held using the British Parliamentary Debate format. The tournament the winners of the open competition are acknowledged as the "World Champions" of debating in Spanish.

The last tournament was held at Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (Campus Estado de México) in Estado de México and Mexico City and the next edition will be hosted by Universidad del Rosario in Bogotá, Colombia.

Format[edit]

The Championship is held in the Northern Hemisphere summer.

The competition involves nine preliminary rounds, which become power-paired as the tournament progresses, matching the strongest-performing teams against each other. Two teams form the government (proposition in the UK and North America) and two the opposition in each debate room. The process of scoring and pairing these teams is known as tabbing. The scoring of teams is done by judges, most of whom are students or former students from the competing institutions, who return ballots with their scores to the adjudication team, led by a Chief Adjudicator who is assisted by one or more deputies.

The nine preliminary rounds are followed by a break at which the teams proceeding to elimination rounds are announced. In the current tournament format, 32 teams proceed to the quarter-finals, with the best 2 from each debate qualifying for the semi-finals, and the best 2 of each semi-final subsequently proceed to the Grand Final.

In addition, a public speaking competition is also open to all participants in CMUDE. Since edition held in México in 2014 a Nation's World Cup and a Spanish As a Second Language tournament were introduced.

Particularities[edit]

There are some differences with the english-speaking version of the tournament. One of them is that there is no limit on the amount of teams that a university may register to the tournament as long as they fulfill the "n-1" rule, where "n" represents the amount of teams they bring to the tournament and "n-1" is the amount of judges they need to provide.

Since the edition in México 2014 a Nation's World Cup has been held. While in Worlds this competition is not taken on a serious manner, the debating formats change year after year and anyone can represent any country or even fictional countries, in the Spanish-speaking version just one team per nation is allowed and the debaters must represent a nation from which they are a national, with the team being formally registered by the representatives of each nation at the tournament.

Another difference is that composite teams can only exist when it is impossible that those debaters could represent their country due to lack of representation.

The "language status" tournament also has a key difference with Worlds. While Worlds' "ESL" and "EFL" tournaments are only for the teams that were not able to break into the main tournament, the "Español como Segunda Lengua" (Spanish As Second Language) competition features a break of all teams eligible due to their language condition regardless of their performance on the main break, thus crowning the outright "Spanish As a Second Language" world champions and not the best of the teams that didn't break.

Finally, since the 2014 edition, a new focus was given to social service, where a full day was dedicated to teach debate to local students,[1] becoming the first debate tournament in the world that includes events of direct social impact as part of its agenda.

Past Champions and Hosts[edit]

World Universities Championship[edit]

Year Hosts Winners Finalists Semifinalists Quarter Finalists
2015  Colombia Universidad del Rosario Bogotá TBD TBD TBD TBD
2014 [2]  Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México Atizapán de Zaragoza  Colombia Universidad del Rosario

Arturo Vallejo & Daniel Cardona

 Spain Universidad de Córdoba Gonzalo Herreros Moya & Jorge Lucena Pérez

 Spain Universidad Autonóma de Madrid Irene Migelsanz Villanueva & Javier Moreta Llovet

 Spain Universidad Pontificia Comillas Antonio Fabregat & Alberto de Unzurrunzaga Rubio

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario

 Spain Universidad de Murcia

 Colombia Universidad de Tolima

 Spain Universidad de Córdoba

 Peru Pontificia Universidad Católica de Perú

 Chile Universidad de Chile

 Colombia Universidad Nacional de Colombia- sede Medellín

 Colombia Universidad Nacional de Bogotá (x2)

 Chile Universidad Andrés Bello

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario

 Mexico Universidad de Guadalajara

2013 [3]  Spain Universidad Complutense de Madrid Madrid  Chile Universidad Andrés Bello

Ricardo Gómez & Nicole Hansen

 Spain Universidad Francisco de Vitoria David Ferrete Camarzana & Jorge White García

 Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela María Gabriela Vincent Allende & Andrés Ávila

 Spain Universidad de Extremadura Carlos Seseña & Gonzalo Alonso Pinto

 Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario (x2)

 Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela

 Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela (x2)

 Chile Universidad de Chile

 Colombia Universidad de Colombia

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario

 Spain Universidad de Compostela

 Chile Fuerzás Aéreas de Chile

 Chile Universidad Santo Tomás Viña del Mar

2012 [4]  Chile Universidad Andrés Bello Santiago  Chile Universidad de Chile

Santiago Daniel Iribarren Abarca & Nicolás Palma

 Chile Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso César Miranda Reyes & José Meza

 Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México David Alatorre López & Rodolfo Flores Méndez

 Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México José Alberto Ramírez & Valeria García

 Chile Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello (x2)

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario (x2)

 Peru Pontificia Universidad Católica de Perú

 Chile Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María

 Chile Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello

 Venezuela Universidad Católica Andrés Bello

 Chile Universidad de los Andes (x2)

 Chile Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

 Chile Universidad del Desarrollo

2011 [5]  Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela Caracas  Venezuela Universidad Simón Bolívar

Jesús Gorrín & Alain Herrera

 Chile Universidad Católica Andrés Bello Nicole Hansen & Marcelo Rivera

 Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela Howard Ávarez & Rafael Bullones  Colombia Universidad del Rosario Ingrid Rodríguez & Luisa Salazar

 Chile Universidad San Sebastián

 Chile Universidad de Chile

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario  Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela

 Colombia Universidad Nacional de Colombia  Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela (x4)

 Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México

 Colombia Universidad del Rosario

 Spain Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Best Speakers[edit]

Year Hosts Best Speaker Runner-Up Third place
2014 [6]  Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México Atizapán de Zaragoza  Spain Universidad de Extremadura

Gonzalo Alonso Pinto

 Spain Universidad de Extremadura

Carlos Seseńa Vaquero

 Chile Universidad Andrés Bello Fernando Vera
2013[7]  Spain Universidad Complutense Madrid  Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela María Gabriela Vicent Allende  Spain Universidad de Extremadura

Carlos Seseńa Vaquero

 Chile Universidad Andrés Bello Ricardo Gómez
2012[8]  Chile Universidad Andrés Bello Santiago  Chile Universidad de Chile Santiago

Daniel Iribarren Abarca

 Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela

Rita Sleiman

 Chile Universidad de Chile Santiago

Nicolás Palma

2011[9]  Venezuela Universidad Central de Venezuela Caracas  Spain Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Camila Salazar-Simpson

 Chile Universidad Andrés Bello

Nicole Hansen

 Mexico ITESM Campus Estado de México

David Alatorre López

None

Performance by country[edit]

Country Wins Finalists Semifinalists Quarter Finalists Best Ever Ranked Team Best Ever Ranked Speaker
 Chile 2 2 4 11 1st 1st
 Venezuela 1 2 2 7 1st 1st
 Colombia 1 1 7 8 1st 5th
 Spain 0 5 2 2 2nd 1st
 Mexico 0 2 1 2 2nd 2nd
 Peru 0 0 0 2 9th 13th
 Guatemala 0 0 0 0 17th 108th
 United States 0 0 0 0 26th 38th
 Argentina 0 0 0 0 28th 26th
 Costa Rica 0 0 0 0 39th 67th
 El Salvador 0 0 0 0 43rd 47th
 Panama 0 0 0 0 54th 104th
 Romania 0 0 0 0 None 125th

Nation's Cup[edit]

Year Hosts Champions Runner-Up Semifinalists Quarterfinalists
2014 [10]  Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México Atizapán de Zaragoza  Peru  Chile  Colombia

Central America

 Mexico

Mixed Team

Spanish As A Second Language[edit]

Year Hosts Champions Runner-Ups
2014 [11]  Mexico Tec de Monterrey Campus Estado de México Atizapán de Zaragoza  United States Willamette University

 Mexico Shamir Cervantes &  United States Andrés Oswill

 United States Colgate University (x3)

Chile 2012 controversies[edit]

The first criticism of Chile 2012 targeted the motions. Many debaters alleged that some motions were ridicule and hard to debate without tautological definitions, such as "the devil knows better for devil than for old".

During the tournament many observers and teams suspected that the local teams from Universidad Andrés Bello already knew the motions since their arguments had specific information and facts for special cases deemed impossible to know under a 15 minute preparation without the chance to use devices. As well, in the final round many people said the motion wasn't good as a thesis for the great final, nevertheless, all teams from the hosting university, separately, gave the same approach on how they would have addressed the motion and define the concepts of the thesis given after the debate.

As well, there were some discrepancies between the rulings and the actions of certain judges, especially regarding the participation of swing teams in the absence of any team, where the judges applied different criteria in different cases, which represented an injustice to certain universities, considered those cases by the organizers as "the margin of error". In addition to these reviews, there was controversy over cases not covered in the rules, justified as positivised in the operating rules and procedures by the organizers, which later turned out not to be specified in the regulations manual. Moreover, the competition did not follow a "Power matching" format but rather randomized pairings.

The editions held in Spain and Mexico have been exempt from such controversies.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]