Xabier Azkargorta

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Xabier Azkargorta
Personal information
Full name Francisco Xabier Azkargorta Uriarte
Date of birth (1953-09-29) 29 September 1953 (age 60)
Place of birth Azpeitia, Spain
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Forward
Club information
Current team
Club Bolívar (coach)
Youth career
1969–1971 Real Sociedad
1971–1972 Athletic Bilbao
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1972–1977 Athletic Bilbao 0 (0)
1975–1976 Bilbao Athletic
Teams managed
1978–1980 Lagun Onak
1980–1982 Aurrerá Ondarroa
1982–1983 Gimnàstic
1983–1986 Español
1986–1987 Real Valladolid
1987–1988 Sevilla
1990 Tenerife
1993–1994 Bolivia
1995–1996 Chile
1997–1998 Yokohama Marinos
2005 Guadalajara
2012–2014 Bolivia
2014– Club Bolívar
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Azkargorta and the second or maternal family name is Uriarte.

Francisco Xabier Azkargorta Uriarte (born 29 September 1953) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a forward, and the current manager of Club Bolívar.

Football career[edit]

Born in Azpeitia, Gipuzkoa, Azkargorta spent five years under contract to Athletic Bilbao after arriving in 1971 from neighbouring Real Sociedad and complete his formation at the former, but failed to appear in any official games with the first team due to injury. He retired at only 23 years of age.

Azkargorta started working as a manager one year after retiring, his beginnings being in lower league football mainly in his native Basque Country. In the 1982 summer, the 28-year-old was appointed at Gimnàstic de Tarragona in Segunda División B[1] and, the following season, moved straight into La Liga after signing for RCD Español.[2]

After two more years in Catalonia, Azkargorta continued to coach in the top flight until 1991, being in charge of Real Valladolid,[3] Sevilla FC[4] and CD Tenerife,[5] and being fired by the last two clubs before the respective campaigns ended.[6][7]

Still in the decade, Azkargorta worked with the national teams of Bolivia and Chile. He led the former to the 1994 FIFA World Cup, this marking the first time the country reached the tournament through the qualification process.[8][9][10] In 1997 he returned to club duties after signing with Yokohama F. Marinos and, eight years later, took charge of Mexico's C.D. Guadalajara; in between, he spent two years with Real Madrid as head of its academies in Central and South America.[11]

In March 2006, Azkargorta was appointed director of football at Beijing Guoan F.C. in the Chinese Super League.[12] In the 2008 summer he returned to his homeland, joining Valencia CF in the same capacity.[13]

Azkargorta was again chosen as Bolivian national side manager on 17 July 2012, replacing Gustavo Quinteros six games into the 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign.[14] He was relieved of his duties on 9 March 2014, after it was revealed he had signed with Club Bolívar.[15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Javier Azkargorta: El técnico más joven de Segunda" [Javier Azkargorta: Segunda's youngest coach] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 22 August 1982. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "La hora de Azkargorta" [Azkargorta's time] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 14 September 1983. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Azkargorta, nuevo entrenador del Valladolid" [Azkargorta, new Valladolid manager] (in Spanish). El País. 4 September 1986. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  4. ^ "Azkargorta: Un Miura para empezar" [Azkargorta: A Miura for starters] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 29 August 1987. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  5. ^ "Azkargorta, nuevo entrenador del Tenerife" [Azkargorta, new Tenerife manager] (in Spanish). El País. 25 January 1990. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  6. ^ "Azkargorta: Crónica de un demisión anunciada" [Azkargorta: Chronicle of an announced sacking] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 10 February 1989. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  7. ^ "Paqui, lesionado de gravedad" [Paqui, seriously injured] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 7 January 1991. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  8. ^ "Azkargorta, nuevo seleccionador de Chile" [Azkargorta, new Chile national team manager] (in Spanish). El País. 19 November 1994. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  9. ^ ""Quien vivió en Bolivia entiende a Evo Morales"" ["He who lived in Bolivia understands Evo Morales"] (in Spanish). Diario AS. 21 May 2006. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  10. ^ "Entrevista a Azkargorta: ”Bolivia no rentabilizó el éxito de 1994" [″Azkargorta interview: ”Bolivia did not build on 1994 success″] (in Spanish). 1 April 2009. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  11. ^ "Azkargorta se despidió del Real Madrid para comandar al Rebaño Sagrado" [Azkargorta said goodbye to Real Madrid to lead Sacred Flock] (in Spanish). Medio Tiempo. 22 August 2005. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  12. ^ "El técnico azpeitiarra Xabier Azkargorta, nuevo director deportivo del club de fútbol Beijing Gouan, en China" [Azpeitia manager Xabier Azkargorta, new sporting director of Beijing Gouan football club, in China] (in Spanish). Euskalkultura. 16 March 2006. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  13. ^ "Azkargorta, el 'español errante'" [Azkargorta, the 'wandering Spaniard'] (in Spanish). El Mundo. 14 July 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  14. ^ "Azkargorta vuelve a coger a la selección de Bolivia" [Azkargorta takes reins of Bolivia national team again] (in Spanish). Sport You. 17 July 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  15. ^ "Bolivia destituye a Azkargorta por negociar con el Bolívar" [Bolivia fires Azkargorta for negotiating with Bolívar] (in Spanish). Diario AS. 9 March 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  16. ^ "Azkargorta se incorpora a Bolívar" [Azkargorta joins Bolívar] (in Spanish). Marca. 8 March 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 

External links[edit]