133 Cyrene

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
133 Cyrene
Discovery
Discovered by James Craig Watson
Discovery date 16 August 1873
Designations
Named after
Cyrene (mythology)
A910 NB; 1936 HO;
1948 QC; 1959 UR
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 142.65 yr (52104 d)
Aphelion 3.48274 AU (521.010 Gm)
Perihelion 2.64706 AU (395.995 Gm)
3.06490 AU (458.503 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.13633
5.37 yr (1959.9 d)
17.03 km/s
316.166°
0° 11m 1.273s / day
Inclination 7.21561°
319.066°
289.646°
Earth MOID 1.64415 AU (245.961 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.65199 AU (247.134 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.206
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 66.57±6.0 km
Mass 3.1 × 1017 kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0186 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0352 km/s
12.708 h (0.5295 d)[1]
12.707 h (0.5295 d)[2]
0.2563±0.053[1]
0.2563[3]
Temperature ~133 K
S[3]
7.98,[1] 7.990[4]

133 Cyrene is a fairly large and very bright main-belt asteroid that was discovered by J. C. Watson on August 16, 1873, and named after Cyrene, a nymph, daughter of king Hypseus and beloved of Apollo in Greek mythology.[5] It is classified as an S-type asteroid based upon its spectrum. It is listed as a member of the Hecuba group of asteroids that orbit near the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter.[6]

In the Tholen classification system, it is categorized as a stony SR-type asteroid.[7] Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Altimira Observatory in 1985 gave a light curve with a period of 12.707 ± 0.015 hours and a brightness variation of 0.22 in magnitude. This result matches previous measurements reported in 1984 and 2005.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Yeomans, Donald K., "133 Cyrene", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Buchheim, Robert K. (June 2006), "Photometry of asteroids 133 Cyrene, 454 Mathesis, 477 Italia, and 2264 Sabrina", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 33 (2), pp. 29–30, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...29B. 
  3. ^ a b Richmond, Michael (March 1, 2001), "Asteroid Lightcurve Data File", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series, retrieved 2013-03-29. 
  4. ^ Pravec, P.; et al. (May 2012), "Absolute Magnitudes of Asteroids and a Revision of Asteroid Albedo Estimates from WISE Thermal Observations", Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, Proceedings of the conference held May 16–20, 2012 in Niigata, Japan (1667), Bibcode:2012LPICo1667.6089P. 
  5. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D.; International Astronomical Union (2003), Dictionary of minor planet names, Berlin; New York: Springer-Verlag, p. 27, ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3, retrieved 13 May 2012. 
  6. ^ McDonald, Sophia Levy (June 1948), "General perturbations and mean elements, with representations of 35 minor planets of the Hecuba group", Astronomical Journal 53, p. 199, Bibcode:1948AJ.....53..199M, doi:10.1086/106097. 
  7. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus 202 (1), pp. 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 2013-04-08.  See appendix A.

External links[edit]