2008–09 ISU Speed Skating World Cup

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ISU Speed Skating World Cup
Dates 7 November 2008 – 7 March 2009
Medalist men
Medalist women
ISU Speed Skating World Cup
2008–09
Men

100 m | 500 m | 1000 m | 1500 m | 5k/10k | Team pursuit

Women

100 m | 500 m | 1000 m | 1500 m | 3k/5k | Team pursuit

World Cup weekends

Berlin | Heerenveen (1) | Moscow | Changchun | Nagano
Kolomna | Erfurt | Heerenveen (2) | Salt Lake City

The 2008–09 ISU Speed Skating World Cup, officially the Essent ISU World Cup Speed Skating 2008–2009, was a series of international speed skating competitions which ran the entire season. The season started on 7 November 2008 in Berlin, Germany, and ended on 7 March 2009 in Salt Lake City, United States.[1][2] In total, nine competition weekends were held at eight different locations, twelve cups were contested (six for men, and six for women), and 84 races took place. The World Cup is organized by the International Skating Union (ISU).

Calendar[edit]

WC # City Venue Date 100 m 500 m 1000 m 1500 m 3000 m 5000 m 10000 m Team pursuit
1 Berlin Sportforum Hohenschönhausen 7–9 November 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
2 Heerenveen Thialf 14–16 November 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
3 Moscow Krylatskoye Sport Complex 22–23 November m, w w m
4 Changchun Jilin Provincial Speed Skating Rink 6–7 December m, w 2m, 2w 2m, 2w
5 Nagano M-Wave 13–14 December m, w 2m, 2w 2m, 2w
Tomakomai Tomakomai Highland Sports Center 4–5 January 2009 Asian Speed Skating Championships
Heerenveen Thialf 9–11 January 2009 European Speed Skating Championships
Moscow Krylatskoye Sport Complex 17–18 January 2009 World Sprint Speed Skating Championships
6 Kolomna Kometa Ice Rink 24–25 January m, w 2m, 2w 2m, 2w
7 Erfurt Gunda Niemann-Stirnemann Halle 30 January – 1 February 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w
Hamar Vikingskipet 7–8 February 2009 World Allround Speed Skating Championships
8 Heerenveen Thialf 14–15 February m, w w m
9 Salt Lake City Utah Olympic Oval 6–7 March m, w m, w m, w m, w w m
Vancouver Richmond Olympic Oval 12–15 March 2009 World Single Distance Speed Skating Championships
Total 4m, 4w 13m, 13w 10m, 10w 6m, 6w 4w 4m, 2w 2m 3m, 3w

Note: the men's 5000 and 10000 metres were contested as one cup, and the women's 3000 and 5000 metres were contested as one cup, as indicated by the color coding.

World records[edit]

World records going into the 2008–09 season.

Men[edit]

Distance Time Nat. Holder Date Venue Reference
500 m 34.03 Canada Jeremy Wotherspoon 9 November 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [3]
1000 m 1:07.00 Finland Pekka Koskela 10 November 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [4]
1500 m 1:42.01 Canada Denny Morrison 14 March 2008 Olympic Oval, Calgary [5]
5000 m 6:03.32 Netherlands Sven Kramer 17 November 2007 Olympic Oval, Calgary [6]
10000 m 12:41.69 Netherlands Sven Kramer 10 March 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [7]
Team pursuit
(8 laps)
3:37.80 Netherlands Sven Kramer
Carl Verheijen
Erben Wennemars
11 March 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [8]

At the World Cup stop in Salt Lake City on 6 March 2009, Shani Davis of the United States set a new world record on the men's 1500 metres with a time of 1:41.80.[5] The next day, Davis' countryman Trevor Marsicano first set a new world record on the 1000 metres distance with a time of 1:06.88,[4] after which Davis improved it further, with a time of 1:06.42.[4]

Women[edit]

Distance Time Nat. Holder Date Venue Reference
500 m 37.02 Germany Jenny Wolf 16 November 2007 Olympic Oval, Calgary [9]
1000 m 1:13.11 Canada Cindy Klassen 25 March 2006 Olympic Oval, Calgary [10]
1500 m 1:51.79 Canada Cindy Klassen 20 November 2005 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [11]
3000 m 3:53.34 Canada Cindy Klassen 18 March 2006 Olympic Oval, Calgary [12]
5000 m 6:45.61 Czech Republic Martina Sáblíková 11 March 2007 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [13]
Team pursuit
(6 laps)
2:56.04 Germany Daniela Anschütz-Thoms
Anni Friesinger
Claudia Pechstein
12 November 2005 Olympic Oval, Calgary [14]

Men's standings[edit]

100 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Japan Yuya Oikawa 450
2 China Yu Fengtong 305
3 South Korea Lee Kang-seok 270

500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 China Yu Fengtong 1086
2 Japan Keiichiro Nagashima 957
3 United States Tucker Fredricks 642

1000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 United States Shani Davis 840
2 Canada Denny Morrison 705
3 Netherlands Stefan Groothuis 590

1500 m[edit]

Mark Tuitert, early leader in the 1500 m World Cup.
Rank Name Points
1 United States Shani Davis 470
2 United States Trevor Marsicano 374
3 Norway Håvard Bøkko 363

5000 and 10000 m[edit]

Sven Kramer, winner of the 5 km in Berlin and Heerenveen.
Rank Name Points
1 Netherlands Sven Kramer 550
2 Norway Håvard Bøkko 485
3 Netherlands Bob de Jong 425

Team pursuit[edit]

Rank Name Points
1  Canada 310
2  Italy 220
3  Japan 210

Women's standings[edit]

100 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Germany Jenny Wolf 450
2 Netherlands Thijsje Oenema 236
3 China Xing Aihua 230

500 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Germany Jenny Wolf 1205
2 Netherlands Margot Boer 642
3 South Korea Lee Sang-hwa 635

1000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Canada Christine Nesbitt 646
2 Canada Kristina Groves 507
3 Netherlands Laurine van Riessen 468

1500 m[edit]

Kristina Groves, winner of the 1500 m in Berlin and Heerenveen, and the World Cup winner.
Rank Name Points
1 Canada Kristina Groves 526
2 Germany Daniela Anschütz-Thoms 355
3 Canada Christine Nesbitt 335

3000 and 5000 m[edit]

Rank Name Points
1 Czech Republic Martina Sáblíková 610
2 Germany Daniela Anschütz-Thoms 375
3 Canada Kristina Groves 375

Team pursuit[edit]

Rank Name Points
1  Czech Republic 235
2  United States 205
3  Netherlands 200

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Cup Speed Skating 2008/2009, International Skating Union.
  2. ^ World Cups of the 2008-09 season, SpeedSkatingStats.com.
  3. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  6. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  7. ^ "Evolution of the world record 10,000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  8. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  10. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  11. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  12. ^ "Evolution of the world record 3000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 
  14. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2013. 

External links[edit]