2020 North Carolina judicial elections

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At least three justices of the seven-member North Carolina Supreme Court and five judges of the 15-member North Carolina Court of Appeals will be elected by North Carolina voters on November 3, 2020, concurrently with other state elections. Terms for seats on each court are eight years. These elections are conducted on a partisan basis.

Supreme Court (Chief Justice seat)[edit]

Chief Justice Mark Martin, a Republican, announced his resignation in 2019, triggering an election for his seat in 2020. Governor Roy Cooper appointed Associate Justice Cheri Beasley, a Democrat, to become Chief Justice through 2020.[1]

Incumbent Associate Justice Paul Newby, a Republican whose term is up for election in 2020, announced his intention to run for Chief Justice.[2]

Candidates[edit]

Supreme Court (Davis seat)[edit]

Beasley's elevation to the position of Chief Justice made her Associate Justice seat vacant, which also triggered a 2020 election. Governor Cooper appointed Judge Mark A. Davis, at the time a judge of the Court of Appeals, to fill the vacancy as an Associate Justice through the election.[3]

Supreme Court (Newby seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Associate Justice Paul Newby is up for election in 2020, but he announced that he would run for Chief Justice instead.

Candidates[edit]

Court of Appeals (Brook seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Judge Christopher Brook, a Democrat appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper to fill a vacancy, will be on the 2020 ballot.

Court of Appeals (Bryant seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Judge Wanda G. Bryant, a Democrat, will be on the 2020 ballot.

Court of Appeals (Dillon seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Judge Chris Dillon, a Republican, will be on the 2020 ballot.

Court of Appeals (McGee seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Chief Judge Linda M. McGee, a Democrat, will be on the 2020 ballot.

Court of Appeals (Young seat)[edit]

The seat currently held by Judge Reuben Young, a Democrat appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper to fill a vacancy, will be on the 2020 ballot.

References[edit]