53 Kalypso

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53 Kalypso
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Karl Theodor Robert Luther
Discovery date April 4, 1858
Designations
Named after
Calypso
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 471.807 Gm (3.154 AU)
Perihelion 311.998 Gm (2.086 AU)
391.903 Gm (2.620 AU)
Eccentricity 0.204
1548.736 d (4.24 a)
18.21 km/s
98.113°
Inclination 5.153°
143.813°
312.330°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 115.4 km[2]
Mass (5.63 ± 5.00) × 1018 kg[3]
Mean density
8.28 ± 7.54[3] g/cm3
0.0323 m/s²
0.0610 km/s
9.036[4] h
Albedo 0.040[2][5]
Temperature ~172 K
8.81[2]

53 Kalypso /kəˈlɪps/ is a large and very dark main belt asteroid that was discovered by German astronomer Robert Luther on April 4, 1858 at Düsseldorf.[1] It is named after Calypso, a sea nymph in Greek mythology, a name it shares with Calypso, a moon of Saturn.

The orbit of 53 Kalypso places it in a mean motion resonance with the planets Jupiter and Saturn. The computed Lyapunov time for this asteroid is 19,000 years, indicating that it occupies a chaotic orbit that will change randomly over time because of gravitational perturbations of the planets.[6]

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2005–06 gave a light curve with a period of 18.075 ± 0.005 hours and a brightness variation of 0.14 in magnitude.[7] In 2009, a photometric study from a different viewing angle was performed at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico, yielding a rotation period of 9.036 ± 0.001 with a brightness variation of 0.14 ± 0.02 magnitude. This is exactly half of the 2005-06 result. The author of the earlier study used additional data observation that favored the 9.036 hour period. The discrepancy was deemed a consequence of viewing the asteroid from different longitudes.[4]

Kalypso has been studied by radar.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances (IAU Minor Planet center), retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d Yeomans, Donald K., "53 Kalypso", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 2013-04-12. 
  3. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  4. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (April 2010), "Rotation Period Determination for 53 Kalypso", The Minor Planet Bulletin 37 (2), pp. 75–76, Bibcode:2010MPBu...37...75P. 
  5. ^ Asteroid Data Sets
  6. ^ Šidlichovský, M. (1999), Svoren, J.; Pittich, E. M.; Rickman, H., eds., "Resonances and chaos in the asteroid belt", Evolution and source regions of asteroids and comets : proceedings of the 173rd colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, held in Tatranska Lomnica, Slovak Republic, August 24–28, 1998, pp. 297–308, Bibcode:1999esra.conf..297S. 
  7. ^ Pray, Donald P.; et al. (December 2006), "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 53, 698, 1016, 1523, 1950, 4608, 5080 6170, 7760, 8213, 11271, 14257, 15350 and 17509", The Minor Planet Bulletin 33 (4), pp. 92–95, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...92P. 
  8. ^ "Radar-Detected Asteroids and Comets". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2011-10-30. 

External links[edit]