Allison Road (video game)

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Allison Road
Allison Road logo.png
Developer(s) Lilith Ltd
Far From Home
Programmer(s) Alex Frerich
Patrick Schnegg
Lukas Märki
Artist(s) Chris Kesler
Composer(s) Marco Genovesi
Engine Unreal Engine 4
Platform(s) Linux
Microsoft Windows
OS X
Release TBA
Genre(s) Survival horror
Mode(s) Single-player

Allison Road is an upcoming first-person survival horror video game for Linux, Microsoft Windows, OS X by Lilith Ltd and formerly to be published by Team17. It was considered to be a spiritual successor to P.T., the playable teaser for the cancelled video game Silent Hills.[1][2] Before being funded by Team17, the game's development was fan-based.[3] On 4 June 2016, the Allison Road Twitter account announced the game's cancellation.[4] On August 22, 2016 an announcement was made on the Twitter account indicating that work on the game had resumed.[5]

Gameplay[edit]

The gameplay of Allison Road is similar to that of P.T., presenting a minimal storyline which the player must solve. While not wanting to reveal too much of the actual game, developers stated the full version may be slightly different. According to the development team, "pretty much all of our core mechanics are in place, however, some actually didn't make the cut-off for the video; the inventory is one of those things."[6] Most of the objects found by the player in the house can be interacted with or inspected, and the player is shown in the teaser being able to equip bladed weapons such as a meat cleaver.

Plot[edit]

The player controls an unnamed protagonist who awakens in his townhouse with a splitting headache, who exclaims that he needs to find some Aspirin. Exploring the ground floor of his house, the protagonist expresses confusion at seemingly-familiar objects and photographs, suggesting that he is also suffering from amnesia. After retrieving a packet of Lemsip tablets from the master bedroom, the protagonist exclaims that he needs water (to drink with the tablets), and ventures further around the house, gradually becoming stalked by a supernatural entity of some sort. As the player explores the house, evidence gathered from letters and photos suggest his family has been the victim of a heinous crime. Most rooms, including the back garden and patio of the house, can be explored by the player. Though some doors are initially locked, some eventually open as the teaser progresses. In the final moments of the trailer, the player discovers a ghoulish figure, assumed to be the ghost of his wife, which attacks him just before the screen cuts to black.[7]

Development[edit]

On 1 July 2015, a 13-minute-long pre-alpha video has been released. The style was considered a homage to P.T., the playable teaser for Silent Hills.[8] The game was being developed on Unreal Engine 4.[9] To fund the game, developer Lilith Ltd. created a Kickstarter asking for £250,000.[10] However, the campaign was cancelled, as Team17 became the game's publisher, which would provide funds for the team to develop the game.[11] The Xbox One and PlayStation 4 releases were not certain, as Team17 had not promised that it would be released on those platforms. It was thought that it might when the game was being funded by Kickstarter. According to their website, the developers were aiming to a Q3 2016 release. On 4 June 2016, the Allison Road Twitter account announced the game's cancellation.[12]

On 22 August, it was announced that development will resume without Team17 involvement as a publisher and under the newly formed studio Far From Home, consisting of the game's creator, Chris Kesler, and his wife.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hernandez, Patricia (1 July 2015). "Fans Are Making A Spiritual Successor To P.T., And It Looks Terrifying". Kotaku. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  2. ^ Rad, Chloi (1 July 2015). "Allison Road Keeps PT Alive With New Gameplay Video". IGN. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  3. ^ Lambie, Ryan (1 July 2015). "Fans Create Their Own Version of Konami's Cancelled PT". Den of Geek. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  4. ^ Hawkins, John (4 June 2016). "Allison Road, the Spiritual Successor to Silent Hills, Canceled". Shacknews. Retrieved 4 June 2016.
  5. ^ "Allison Road: P.T. Spiritual Successor Revived - IGN". IGN. 2 August 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  6. ^ Shaikh, Sehran (1 July 2015). "Allison Road, The Game Inspired By Silent Hills/P.T Receives 14 Mins Of Pre-Alpha Gameplay Footage, Looks Terrifying". Gamepur. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  7. ^ Farokhmanesh, Megan (1 July 2015). "P.T.-like horror game Allison Road is creepy, creepy, creepy and we love it". Polygon. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  8. ^ Labbe, Mark (1 July 2015). "PT Game spiritual Successor Allison Road Looks Terrifying". PlayStation LifeStyle. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  9. ^ Matulef, Jeffery (1 July 2015). "Allison Road looks like the fan-made spiritual successor to P.T." Eurogamer. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  10. ^ Farokhmanesh, Megan (21 September 2015). "Allison Road turns to Kickstarter to fund its mega creeps, aims for 2016 release". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 21 September 2015. Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  11. ^ Orry, James (12 October 2015). "Allison Road Kickstarter cancelled, will now be published by Team17". VideoGamer.com. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  12. ^ Road, Allison (4 June 2016). "Allison Road on Twitter: "Hi all. Sadly Allison Road had to be cancelled. Statement to come in the next few days. Thx for all your support and very sad it came 2 this"". twitter.com. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  13. ^ Rad, Chloi (22 August 2016). "Allison Road: P.T. Spiritual Successor Revived". IGN.com. Retrieved 24 August 2016.

External links[edit]