Amos B. Coe House

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Amos B. Coe House
Amos B. Coe House.jpg
The Amos B. Coe House from the southeast
Amos B. Coe House is located in Minnesota
Amos B. Coe House
Amos B. Coe House is located in the US
Amos B. Coe House
Location 1700 S. 3rd Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota
Coordinates 44°57′58.5″N 93°16′23″W / 44.966250°N 93.27306°W / 44.966250; -93.27306Coordinates: 44°57′58.5″N 93°16′23″W / 44.966250°N 93.27306°W / 44.966250; -93.27306
Area less than one acre
Built 1884
Architectural style Eastlake Style
NRHP Reference # 84001418 [1]
Added to NRHP January 12, 1984

The Amos B. Coe House is a historic home in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the United States. It was built for a local real estate developer in 1884 in the Eastlake Style of Queen Anne architecture. A carriage house in the Shingle Style was added in 1886.[2]

The house is located at 1700 3rd Avenue South in the Stevens Square neighborhood of south Minneapolis. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 for its architectural significance.[1]

Attorneys for the construction, plumbing and electrical companies that had previously won a court judgment for unpaid work at the museum joined together to purchase the property for $1.3 million: the total amount a judge found that they are owed. The group was the sole bidder at the public auction.

Beginning in 2008, the Minnesota African American Museum and Cultural Center occupied the structure. The museum began a $6 million fundraising effort to renovate it. Although the museum spent several million dollars on improvements, its fundraising effort failed to cover the cost of renovations. Creditors won a lawsuit in September 2015 evicting the museum. The creditors now jointly own the property.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Nord, Mary Ann. The National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota: A Guide. St. Paul: The Minnesota Historical Society Press. 2003.
  3. ^ Golden, Erin (September 22, 2015). "After lawsuit, Minnesota African American Museum building sold at public auction". Minneapolis Star Tribune. Retrieved February 3, 2016. 

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