Asclepias eriocarpa

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Asclepias eriocarpa
Asclepiaseriocarpa.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Gentianales
Family: Apocynaceae
Genus: Asclepias
Species:
A. eriocarpa
Binomial name
Asclepias eriocarpa
Synonyms

Asclepias fremontii

Asclepias eriocarpa is a species of milkweed known by the common names woollypod milkweed, Indian milkweed, and kotolo.

Description[edit]

Asclepias eriocarpa is an erect perennial herb which is usually coated in a thick layer of white hairs. The leaves are lance-shaped to oval, rippled, and arranged oppositely in pairs or in whorls of 3 or 4. The inflorescence is a large umbel-like cluster of flowers. Each flower is white to cream and usually tinted with bright pink. It has a central array of rounded hoods and a corolla reflexed against the stalk. The fruit is a large, woolly follicle.

Distribution[edit]

Asclepias eriocarpa is native to California and adjacent parts of Nevada and Baja California, where it grows in many habitat types, especially dry areas.

Uses[edit]

The plant was used as a source of fiber and medicine by several California Indian groups, including the Ohlone and Luiseño.[1] The Concow tribe calls the plant bō'-kō (Konkow language).[2]

Ecology[edit]

Asclepias eriocarpa is a specific monarch butterfly food and habitat plant. It is one of the most poisonous milkweeds. Natural History July/August 2015 calls it the most poisonous, but most sources put it below A. lancifolia.[dubious ] No source found, said whether the toxicity is due to high levels of cardioactive glycosides, or to the presence of a neurotoxic resin which some milkweeds produce in addition to the glycosides.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ethnobotany
  2. ^ Chesnut, Victor King (1902). Plants used by the Indians of Mendocino County, California. Government Printing Office. p. 404. Retrieved 24 August 2012.

External links[edit]