B&B Theatres

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B & B Theatres Operating Company, Inc.[1]
Private
Traded as B&B Theatres
Industry Entertainment (movie theatres)
Founded January 1, 1924
Headquarters Gladstone, Missouri
Number of locations
50
Website B&B Theatres

B&B Theatres is a family-owned and operated American movie theater chain based in Gladstone, Missouri.[2][1] Founded in 1924, B&B is the eighth-largest theater chain in the United States, operating 414 screens at 50 locations in Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, Kansas, Missouri, Mississippi, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas.[2][3] The company also maintains offices in Salisbury, Missouri and Fulton, Missouri.[citation needed]

History[edit]

In 1924, Missourian Elmer Bills, Sr., founded Bills Theaters in Salisbury, Missouri. Elmer met his wife Johnnie when he purchased the Lyric Theater in Salisbury, where she was the piano player for the silent films. Their son Elmer Bills, Jr. was born a few years later. In 1959, Elmer Jr. graduated from the University of Missouri and married one of his "popcorn girls", Amy. The two generations of Bills continued the expansion of the company, and welcomed the birth of Elmer Jr. and Amy's daughter, Bridget. Sterling Bagby went to work for Elmer Sr. as a concession clerk at age 10 in 1936. After serving a stint in World War II, Bagby returned to Missouri and married a ticket seller from Higbee, Pauline. Together, the Bagbys started the Bagby Traveling Picture Show. The Show was, in essence, a portable movie theater, and the Bagbys traveled along with the equipment (including seats, snack bar, film, and projectors) showing movies in schools and barns. Their company became a Kansas circuit of both drive-ins and "hardtop" indoor movie theaters.[2] Sterling and Pauline have three children: Steve, Bob, and Paula.[citation needed]

The two companies formally merged after years of friendship and combined efforts as B&B (Bills and Bagby) Theaters on January 1, 1980, making the Fulton Cinema the first official B&B Theatre.[2] Just months earlier in 1979, Bob Bagby married Bridget Bills and cemented the convergence of the two companies.[citation needed] Sterling died in October 2000, and the remaining family run the National Association of Theater Owners-recognized Midwest chain. From 2000 to 2014 B&B replaced several of their existing locations with new state-of-the-art facilities as well as acquired, remodeled, or built several new locations. In 2010 B&B premiered their first PLF (premium large format) Grand Screen® and their first dine-in Marquee Suites® concept auditoriums.[2]

In October 2014, B&B purchased Overland Park, Kansas-based operator Dickinson Theatres.[4]

Digital cinema[edit]

In September 2009, B&B Theatres announced that it had selected Christie Digital Systems to supply 2K digital projectors for the circuit's transition to realD 3D-capable digital cinema.[5] The digital conversion was completed by August 2012.[6]

Locations[edit]

Each red dot shows the location of a B&B theatre as of 2007.

Arkansas[edit]

Arizona[edit]

  • Goodyear Palm Valley 14
  • Mesa Gateway 12 IMAX (Closed 3/2017 sold to AMC)

Florida[edit]

Kansas[edit]

Mississippi[edit]

Missouri[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

  • Hastings Imperial 3 (Closed in March of 2017)

Oklahoma[edit]

Texas[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gen. Business - For Profit Details as of 1/14/2017". Missouri Secretary of State. January 14, 2017. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "B&B Today". B&B Theatres. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Locations". B&B Theatres. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  4. ^ Stafford, Diane (October 9, 2014). "Overland Park's Dickinson Movie Theater Chain Changes Hands". Kansas City Star. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Midwest's B&B Theatres Selects Christie DLP Cinema® Projectors for Its Newest Locations". DCinemaToday.com. September 14, 2009. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  6. ^ Williams, Joe (August 11, 2012). "Digital Revolution Could be Curtains for Old Theaters". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Fulton Cinema Moves to 8-Screen Building". CinemaTreasures.org. January 23, 2006. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  8. ^ "History of The Fulton Theatre Fulton, Missouri" (PDF). TheBrickDistrict.Tripod.com. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 
  9. ^ Bertacchi, Denise (October 1, 2010). "Wildwood 10 Now Open, Has Over 21 Theaters". DirectoryofStLouis.com. Retrieved January 14, 2017. 

External links[edit]