BSAT-2b

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BSAT-2b
Mission typeCommunication
OperatorB-SAT
COSPAR ID2001-029B[1]
SATCAT no.26864
Mission durationLaunch failure
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftBSAT-2b
BusSTAR-1[2]
ManufacturerOrbital Sciences Corporation
Launch mass1,317 kg (2,903 lb)
Dry mass535 kg (1,179 lb)
Dimensions3.76 m × 2.49 m × 2.03 m (12.3 ft × 8.2 ft × 6.7 ft)
Power2.6 kW
Start of mission
Launch date23:58, July 12,  2001 (UTC) (2001-07-12T23:58Z) (failure)[3]
RocketAriane 5G V-142
Launch siteGuiana Space Center ELA-3
ContractorArianespace
End of mission
DisposalDecayed from wrong orbit
Decay dateJanuary 28, 2014 (2014-01-28)
Transponders
Band4 (plus 4 spares) Ku band
TWTA power130 Watts
← BSAT-2a
BSAT-2c →
 

BSAT-2b, was a geostationary communications satellite ordered by B-SAT which was designed and manufactured by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the STAR-1 platform. It was designed to be stationed on the 110° East orbital slot along its companion BSAT-2a where it would provide redundant high definition direct television broadcasting across Japan.[4][5]

But the Ariane 5G rocket had an anomaly during its July 12, 2001 launch. It left BSAT-2b stranded in an orbit too low for the its propulsion system to compensate and the spacecraft was written off.[6][7][3] BSAT ordered BSAT-2c immediately to replace it.[8] It decayed and burned in the atmosphere on January 28, 2014.[3][9]

Satellite description[edit]

BSAT-2b was designed and manufactured by Orbital Sciences Corporation on the STAR-1 satellite bus for B-SAT. It had a launch mass of 1,317 kg (2,903 lb), a dry mass of 927 kg (2,044 lb), and a 10-year design life.[10] As all four STAR-1 satellites, it had a solid rocket Star 30CBP apogee kick motor for orbit raising, plus 200 kg (440 lb) of propellant for its liquid propellant station keeping thrusters.[5][2][11][11]

It measured 3.76 m × 2.49 m × 2.03 m (12.3 ft × 8.2 ft × 6.7 ft) when stowed for launch. Its dual wing solar panels can generate 2.6 kW of power at the beginning of its design life, and span 16.10 m (52.8 ft) when fully deployed.[10]

It has a single Ku band payload with four active transponders plus four spares with a TWTA output power of 130 Watts.[4][10]

History[edit]

On March 1999, B-SAT ordered from Orbital Sciences Corporation two satellites based on the STAR-1 platform: BSAT-2a and BSAT-2b.[8] This was the second order of the bus and the first since Orbital had acquired CTA Space Systems, the original developer.[2]

BSAT-2b was launched aboard an Ariane 5G at 23:58 UTC, July 12, 2001 from Guiana Space Center ELA-3.[6] It rode on the lower berth below Artemis. But the EPS upper stage had an anomaly and left the satellites on a 17,528 km × 592 km × 2.9° orbit, short of the planned 35,853 km × 858 km × 2.0°. While Artemis used its electric propulsion to make up for the difference. But BSAT-2b Star 30CBP apogee kick motor could not make up for the orbital energy short fall and was written off.[7][3][8]

On January 28, 2014 BSAT-2b decayed from its orbit and burned in the atmosphere.[3][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BSAT 2B". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 2016-09-07.
  2. ^ a b c Richmond, Christopher W. (2008). "The Growth of Orbital Sciences and the Market for Small GEO Satellites" (PDF). Space Japan Review (English version). AIAA JFSC (55). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-09-06. Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  3. ^ a b c d e "BSAT 2B". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 2016-09-07.
  4. ^ a b "BSAT-2 Series" (PDF). Orbital ATK. 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-09-06. Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  5. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-17). "BSat 2a, 2b". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-29.
  6. ^ a b Ray, Justin (July 12, 2001). "Ariane 5 falls short". Space Flight Now. Retrieved 2016-09-08.
  7. ^ a b Ray, Justin (July 13, 2001). "Ariane 5 failure investigation focuses on upper stage". Space Flight Now. Retrieved 2016-09-08.
  8. ^ a b c "沿革" [History]. Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation. Retrieved 2016-09-07.
  9. ^ a b "BSAT-2B". n2yo.com. Retrieved 2016-09-09.
  10. ^ a b c "Launch Kit V-142" (PDF). Arianespace. July 5, 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2004-04-11. Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  11. ^ a b Wade, Mark. "Star Bus". Astronautix.com. Encyclopaedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2016-09-07.