Barclay de Tolly (Russian nobility)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Barclay de Tolly)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Barclay de Tolly
Coat of arms of the Barclay de Tollys
Arms of Prince Barclay de Tolly
Parent houseClan Barclay[1]
CountryRussian Empire
TitlesPrince
MottoВерность и терпение
("Loyalty and patience")
The coat of arms of Prince Barclay de Tolly-Weymarn

Barclay de Tolly (Russian: Баркла́й-де-То́лли) is the name of a Baltic German noble family of Scottish origin (Clan Barclay). During the time of the Revolution of 1688 in Britain, the family migrated to Russia from Towy (Towie) in Aberdeenshire. It then became a German-speaking family in Livonia.

Weinhold Gotthard Barclay de Tolly (Russian: Богдан Баркла́й-де-То́лли; 1734–1781) was a poruchik of the Russian Army and a descendant of one of the burgomasters of Riga. He was the first of his family to be accepted into the Russian nobility. He was married to Margaretha Elisabeth von Smitten (1733–1771), and they had four sons: Emil Johann, a General in the Russian service; B. Michael Bogdanovitch; C. Andrei Bogdanovitch, a Colonel; and Michael Bogdanovitch (known as Prince Michael Andreas Barclay de Tolly), a very prominent military commander who was made a count in 1813 and a prince in 1815 by Alexander I of Russia.

After the extinction of the original Barclay de Tolly princely line upon the death in 1871 of Prince Michael's son, Magnus, Alexander II of Russia allowed Prince Michael's sister's grandson (through female lineage), Alexander von Weymarn, to assume the title of Prince Barclay de Tolly-Weymarn in 1872.[2]

Notable members[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In Russian: Mikhail Bogdanovich Barklay-de-Tolli Cyrillic: Михаи́л Богда́нович Баркла́й-де-То́лли
  1. ^ Scottish Influences in Russian History
  2. ^ http://personen.digitale-sammlungen.de/baltlex/Blatt_bsb00000345,00442.html
  3. ^ "Weymarn, Alexander Magnus Friedrich v., seit 31. Mai 1872 Fürst Barclay de Tolly-W.". Retrieved 8 November 2018. In: BBLd – Baltisches Biographisches Lexikon digital. Göttingen 2012