Bayport (LIRR station)

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Bayport
LIRR DE30 421 Bayport DSC 0473.JPG
LIRR's diesel electric #421 passing the site of the former Bayport Station on the Montauk Line.
Location Railroad Street between Oakwood and Snedecor Avenues
Bayport, New York
Owned by LIRR
Line(s)
Platforms 1 side platform (south side of tracks)
Tracks 2 when station was open, 1 currently
Other information
Station code None
Fare zone 10
History
Opened March 1869
Closed 1980
Rebuilt 1903
Electrified No
Services
  Former service  
Preceding station   MTA NYC logo.svg LIRR   Following station
Sayville station Montauk Branch
(current and former locations)
Blue Point station

Bayport was a station stop along the Montauk Branch of the Long Island Rail Road. It was located on Railroad Street between Oakwood and Snedecor Avenues in Bayport, New York, and was the easternmost station along the Montauk Branch in the Town of Islip.

History[edit]

Railroad Street in Bayport, east of the former station site

The first depot opened around March 1869 by the South Side Railroad of Long Island and was razed around 1903. The second depot opened August 10, 1903 and contained a passing siding, sometimes used for freight. Additionally, it had a connection to the South Shore Traction Company trolleys, which were later replaced by Suffolk Traction Company trolleys. The barrel factory was closed in 1938 and replaced by a Gulf Oil Company distributor. The station was discontinued on September 6, 1980.[1] The station was located between Sayville and Blue Point Stations, the latter of which was discontinued on the same day.[2] The only visible evidence of the former station is the large gap between the tracks and the fence that lines Railroad street.

The vicinity saw several teenage suicides in recent years. A recent victim was Emma Casey, a Bayport-Blue Point High School student, on June 13, 2005.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morrison, David D.; Pakaluk, Valerie (2003). Long Island Rail Road Stations. Images of Rail. Chicago: Arcadia Publishing. p. 95. ISBN 0-7385-1180-3. Retrieved 2011-11-25. 
  2. ^ Emery, Robert; Erlitz, Jeff; Huneke, Art; Seyfried, Vincent. "Long Island Rail Road History". trainsarefun.com. Retrieved 30 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "Emma Casey (15) committed suicide by jumping in front of a train". mydeathspace.com. MyDeathSpace.com. Retrieved 30 July 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°44′42″N 73°3′22″W / 40.74500°N 73.05611°W / 40.74500; -73.05611