Brock Nelson

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Brock Nelson
Brock Nelson 2018-03-03 19517.jpg
Nelson with the New York Islanders in 2018
Born (1991-10-15) October 15, 1991 (age 31)
Minneapolis, Minnesota,[1] U.S.
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
Position Center
Shoots Left
NHL team New York Islanders
National team  United States
NHL Draft 30th overall, 2010
New York Islanders
Playing career 2012–present

Brock Christian Nelson (born October 15, 1991) is an American professional ice hockey player for the New York Islanders of the National Hockey League (NHL). Nelson was drafted 30th overall in the first round of the 2010 NHL Entry Draft by the Islanders. Prior to playing professional hockey, Nelson played at the University of North Dakota. His first experience in professional hockey was at the American Hockey League (AHL) level with the Islanders' affiliate, the Bridgeport Sound Tigers.

Playing career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Nelson played hockey at Warroad High School, where he was a finalist for the Minnesota Mr. Hockey Award, given to the top Minnesota high school hockey player. He finished the 2009–10 season with 39 goals and 34 assists for 73 points in 25 games for Warroad.[2] On September 24, 2009, Nelson committed to play Division 1 hockey for the University of North Dakota after considering Bemidji State and Nebraska-Omaha[3] and later partook in the 2010 USA Hockey National Junior Evaluation Camp.[4] Nelson was selected 30th overall by the New York Islanders of the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 2010 Entry Draft.[5]

Collegiate[edit]

Nelson competed with the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux for two seasons while majoring in pre-investments.[6] He recorded his first collegiate goal on a power play to lift the Fighting Sioux 3–2 over Minnesota Duluth.[7] Later in the season, he recorded his first two-goal game in a win over Robert Morris Colonials.[8] He recorded a goal off an assist from Joe Gleason to help lead the Fighting Sioux to the WCHA Final Five.[9] Nelson ended the season with the Tom Hoghaug Memorial Scholarship as he led all Sioux freshmen in points and goals.[6] He was also named to the All-WCHA Team and WCHA All-Tournament Team.[10]

Brock Nelson with the Islanders in 2020.

In his sophomore season, Nelson played on a line with Corban Knight and Danny Kristo.[11] By the conclusion of the 2011–12 season, Nelson was named to the All-WCHA Third Team after leading all WCHA players with 20 goals and becoming UND's youngest 20 goal scorer since Jonathan Toews.[12] He was also named a Inside College Hockey All-American,[13] to College Hockey News Second Team,[14] and Inside College Hockey's WCHA Breakthrough Player of the Year.[15] Nelson ended his collegiate career by signing an Entry Level Contract with the New York Islanders on April 3, 2012.[16]

Professional career[edit]

Nelson began his professional career with the Islanders' minor league affiliate, the American Hockey League's (AHL) Bridgeport Sound Tigers after the 2011–12 season, during the 2012 Calder Cup playoffs. He eventually made his NHL debut during the 2013 Stanley Cup playoffs with the Islanders after the 2012–13 regular season.[17] He registered his first NHL point the following season on October 8, 2013, an assist on a goal by Peter Regin in a 6–1 win against the Phoenix Coyotes.[18] His first NHL goal was scored on October 22, 2013 against Roberto Luongo of the Vancouver Canucks.[19]

On October 9, 2017, St. Louis Blues enforcer Robert Bortuzzo cross-checked Nelson multiple times while he was down after Nelson collided with a teammate. Bortuzzo was later fined $3,091.40.[20]

On May 23, 2019, after a career year in the 2018–19 season with 53 points under Barry Trotz, Nelson signed a six-year, $36 million contract to remain with the Islanders.[21]

On April 5, 2021, Nelson was named alternate captain of the Islanders in absence of the injured Anders Lee.[22]

On November 23, 2021, it was announced that Nelson would be out 2-4 weeks with a lower body injury.

International play[edit]

Medal record
Representing  United States
Ice hockey
World Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Czech Republic
World Junior Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2011 United States

Nelson plays internationally for the United States. At the 2011 World Junior Championships, Nelson helped the Americans to a bronze medal, recording one assist in 5 games. Nelson was selected as an alternate captain for Team USA in the 2017 IIHF World Championship.[23]

Personal life[edit]

Nelson's uncle Dave Christian was on the 1980 United States Miracle on Ice gold medal team, and his grandfather, Bill Christian, and great uncle, Roger Christian, were both on the 1960 United States gold medal team and founded Christian Brothers, a company that made hockey sticks in Warroad, Minnesota from 1964 to 2003.[5][24] Another great uncle, Gordon Christian played for the United States at the 1956 Winter Olympics, capturing a silver medal.[25] While his mother did not partake in competitive hockey, she was a figure skater.[26]

Nelson's wife Karley Sylvester is a former Ms. Hockey and competed on the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team.[27] Together, they have three children.[28]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2007–08 Warroad High School MNHS 24 12 7 19 2 3 1 1 2 0
2008–09 Warroad High School MNHS 25 35 23 58 14 3 6 5 11 0
2009–10 Warroad High School MNHS 25 39 34 73 38 3 8 4 12 6
2009–10 Team Great Plains MHSEL 24 16 16 32 12
2010–11 University of North Dakota WCHA 42 8 13 21 27
2011–12 University of North Dakota WCHA 42 28 19 47 4
2011–12 Bridgeport Sound Tigers AHL 4 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0
2012–13 Bridgeport Sound Tigers AHL 66 25 27 52 34
2012–13 New York Islanders NHL 1 0 0 0 0
2013–14 New York Islanders NHL 72 14 12 26 12
2013–14 Bridgeport Sound Tigers AHL 1 0 1 1 2
2014–15 New York Islanders NHL 82 20 22 42 24 6 2 0 2 2
2015–16 New York Islanders NHL 81 26 14 40 30 11 1 4 5 6
2016–17 New York Islanders NHL 81 20 25 45 36
2017–18 New York Islanders NHL 82 19 16 35 43
2018–19 New York Islanders NHL 82 25 28 53 28 8 4 0 4 2
2019–20 New York Islanders NHL 68 26 28 54 32 22 9 9 18 12
2020–21 New York Islanders NHL 56 18 15 33 14 19 7 5 12 4
2021–22 New York Islanders NHL 72 37 22 59 33
NHL totals 676 205 182 387 252 67 23 18 41 26

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
2011 United States WJC 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 5 0 1 1 0
2014 United States WC 6th 8 5 2 7 20
2015 United States WC 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 10 6 4 10 8
2016 United States WC 4th 6 1 3 4 2
2017 United States WC 5th 8 4 3 7 2
Junior totals 5 0 1 1 0
Senior totals 32 16 12 28 32

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
College
All-WCHA Third Team 2011–12
WCHA All-Tournament Team[29] 2012
NHL
NHL All-Star Game 2023

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nelson, Brock - New York Islanders - News". Archived from the original on August 26, 2016. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  2. ^ "Meet the 2010 Draft picks". New York Islanders. July 8, 2010. Retrieved July 28, 2010.
  3. ^ Brad Elliott Schlossman (September 24, 2009). "Warroad's Brock Nelson commits to UND". Grand Forks Herald. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  4. ^ Kimelman, Adam (August 9, 2010). "Nelson competing for U.S. World Junior spot". nhl.com. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Isles work late to draft Brock Nelson". National Hockey League. June 26, 2010. Archived from the original on June 29, 2010. Retrieved June 26, 2010.
  6. ^ a b "BROCK NELSON". fightinghawks.com. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Fontaine's OT goal gives UMD split, first place". fightinghawks.com. November 6, 2010. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Game Notes: First-place Sioux welcome Minnesota". fightinghawks.com. January 12, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Sioux advance to WCHA Final Five with sweep of MTU". fightinghawks.com. March 12, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Conference Awards for North Dakota Men's Hockey". fightinghawks.com. January 4, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "MHKY Notes: UND travels to Alaska Anchorage". fightinghawks.com. November 29, 2011. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Eidsness named WCHA Outstanding Student-Athlete of the Year, Blood and Nelson named All-WCHA". fightinghawks.com. March 8, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Nelson named Inside College Hockey All-American". fightinghawks.com. April 6, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "WCHA goal-scoring leader Nelson honored by CHN". fightinghawks.com. March 27, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Dave Hakstol, Brock Nelson recognized by INCH". fightinghawks.com. March 9, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Nelson Agrees To Terms On Entry Level Contract". nhl.com. April 3, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  17. ^ Betts, Travis (July 10, 2013). "Something to Prove". nhl.com. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "The Skinny - Islanders 6, Coyotes 1". National Hockey League. October 9, 2013.
  19. ^ Betts, Travis (October 22, 2013). "Live Updates - Islanders vs. Canucks 10/22/13". NHL.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  20. ^ "Blues' Robert Bortuzzo fined for cross-checking Islanders' Nelson". Sportsnet. October 9, 2017. Retrieved October 10, 2017.
  21. ^ "Islanders Agree To Terms With Nelson On Six-Year Contract". nhl.com. May 23, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  22. ^ Kandrach, Sasha (April 5, 2021). "Nelson Appointed Alternate". NHL.com. Retrieved April 7, 2021.
  23. ^ Hockey, USA (May 1, 2017). "Murphy Named Captain of 2017 U.S. Men's National Team". Team USA Hockey. Retrieved July 3, 2017.
  24. ^ Prewitt, Alex (November 1, 2016). "Islanders forward Brock Nelson is adding to his family's decorated hockey lineage". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  25. ^ "Brock Nelson". National Hockey League. Retrieved December 15, 2013.
  26. ^ Jeansonne, John (October 24, 2013). "Relatively speaking, hockey success is in Brock Nelson's blood". Newsday. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  27. ^ Baggot, Andy (January 10, 2014). "Badgers women's hockey: No. 2 UW set for showdown with No. 4 North Dakota". madison.com. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  28. ^ @BComptonNHL (May 6, 2019). "Brock Nelson is not here; wife gave birth to their second child yesterday. #Isles" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  29. ^ "WCHA Tourney History". Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014.

External links[edit]

Preceded by New York Islanders first round pick
2010
Succeeded by