California State Route 125

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For the cancer marker, see CA-125.

State Route 125 marker

State Route 125
SR 125 highlighted in red
Route information
Defined by Streets and Highways Code § 425
Maintained by Caltrans and SANDAG
Length: 23.839 mi[1] (38.365 km)
Major junctions
South end: Otay Mesa Road in Otay Mesa
 
North end: SR 52 in Santee
Location
Counties: San Diego
Highway system
SR 124 SR 126

State Route 125 (SR 125) is a state highway in the US state of California. As a freeway, it runs from Otay Mesa Road (former SR 905) in Otay Mesa near the U.S.–Mexico border to SR 52 in Santee. SR 125 serves as an additional north–south route in the San Diego metropolitan area. The definition of the route continues to SR 56, but this portion has not been constructed, and there are no plans to do so.

The southern portion of SR 125 from Otay Mesa Road to SR 54 near Chula Vista is a toll road called the South Bay Expressway (SBX). The toll road was funded by the private company California Transportation Ventures, Inc. and the following public agencies: the United States Department of Transportation, Caltrans, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), and the City of Chula Vista. However, California Transportation Ventures declared bankruptcy in 2010 and sold the road to the San Diego Association of Governments.[2][3][4][5]

Route description[edit]

SR 125 begins as the South Bay Expressway toll road at an interchange with Otay Mesa Road,[6] the former alignment of SR 905. The route heads north, encountering its first toll plaza just before entering the city of Chula Vista. The freeway cuts through the Eastlake neighborhood of Chula Vista before leaving the city and passing through Sweetwater Regional Park near Sweetwater Reservoir. SR 125 intersects with SR 54, where the tolled portion ends, before turning north again through the unincorporated area of La Presa. The freeway briefly enters Lemon Grove before intersecting with SR 94 and entering La Mesa.[7]

SR 125 interchanges with Interstate 8 (I-8) before continuing north through the city of El Cajon and passing near Grossmont College. The freeway continues into Santee, where the route terminates at the SR 52 interchange. Traffic can continue onto SR 52 or onto Mission Gorge Road at the terminus.[7]

SR 125 is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System,[8] and south of I-8 is part of the National Highway System,[9] a network of highways that are essential to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[10] The route is eligible for the State Scenic Highway System,[11] but it is only a scenic highway from SR 94 to I-8 as designated by Caltrans,[12] meaning that it is a substantial section of highway passing through a "memorable landscape" with no "visual intrusions", where the potential designation has gained popular favor with the community;[13] In 2013, SR 125 had an annual average daily traffic (AADT) of 29,000 at the northern terminus, and 161,000 between SR 94 and Lemon Avenue, the latter of which was the highest AADT for the highway.[14]

History[edit]

Route 67[edit]

Added to the state highway system in 1933,[15] and defined in 1935,[16] Route 198 extended from US 80 onto La Mesa Boulevard and Palm Avenue to SR 94 by 1938.[17] In 1947, the San Diego County Highway Development Association requested that the highway from Sixth Avenue in Mission Valley to US 80 be constructed as a freeway.[18] Although sate senator Fred Kraft criticized the proposal in July 1953 because he believed that it would be too expensive and would not reduce congestion in the long-term, especially around the junction with US 80 in Grossmont,[19] approval for the Route 94 freeway extended to the junction with U.S. Route 80 (US 80) by October, with the Grossmont part of the route signed as Route 67.[20] The Route 67 freeway was completed in March 1957, from Campo Road and Route 94 to US 80; the project was completed for $1,625,000.[21][22]

Planning[edit]

Route 282 was defined as a route from Brown Field through La Mesa extending to Route 277 in 1959,[23] and in 1961 the latter terminus was changed to Route 278.[24] The California Highway Commission selected a route for the highway in mid-1963.[25] In the 1964 state highway renumbering, SR 125 was designated as the highway from SR 75 near Brown Field to SR 56. Route 198 was renumbered as State Route 67; the portion south of I-8 was renumbered as SR 125.[26]

At the beginning of that year, the La Mesa City Council expressed their preference for Route 282, which had been nicknamed the Ramona Freeway, to run on the routing of Fletcher Parkway, contrary to local businesses that wanted the highway to be routed 0.25 miles (0.40 km) west of the parkway.[27] A few months later, state engineer Jacob Dekema indicated that there were four routes under consideration for the portion from Brown Field to Sweetwater Lake, and the project would not be completed until well after 1972.[28] The state had selected a route for that part of the highway by June,[29] and for the routing west of Fletcher Parkway extending to Mission Gorge Road by July.[30] The next year, the California Highway Commission approved a routing north of Mission Gorge Road into Poway and ending at SR 56.[31]

In the 1970s, planning continued for the construction of the route, as well as modifications to the existing roadway. The City of La Mesa began discussions regarding adding SR 125 from SR 94 to I-8 into the scenic highway system in 1968;[32] the county Planning Commission continued pursuing these plans in 1970.[33] SR 125 was lengthened by the Legislature to extend to the border in 1972.[34]

In 1973, then-governor Ronald Reagan vetoed a bill to delete part of SR 125 from state plans, over concerns that not enough transportation studies had been done on the matter.[35][36] An improved interchange with SR 94 was being planned the next year.[37] Soon after, Caltrans raised concerns about the remainder of SR 125 not being constructed, due to objections from the community relating to freeway construction in general.[38] Construction began on the SR 94 interchange in October, and continued into late 1975, at a cost of $11 million (about $74 million in 2013 dollars).[39] Parts of the interchange with SR 94 were open by July 20.[40] The City of Chula Vista considered SR 125 as possibly having scenic value when constructed, and considered asking the state to add it to the state highway system;[41] this influenced a rule that construction projects near possible scenic routes in the city had to take natural aesthetics into account.[42] The La Mesa City Council asked the state to modify the interchange with I-8 in July; the original interchange did not allow for access to SR 125 from I-8 east or to I-8 west from SR 125.[43]

In January of the following year, state Assemblyman Wadie Deddeh proposed legislation to remove the southern portion of SR 125 from the state highway plans again.[44] Soon afterward, the Comprehensive Planning Organization (CPO) moved to support retaining SR 125 from Poway to Santee in the county transportation plan, despite opposition from a county supervisor and the mayor of Escondido.[45] Deddeh's bill passed the state Assembly Transportation Committee a month later; in the meeting, Deddeh noted the construction of I-805 to handle the traffic demands of the region, as well as a lack of funding that would result in the construction being delayed for at least 20 years.[46] Despite a petition from the mayor of Escondido, the CPO again declined to remove SR 125 from the county transportation plan in March.[47]

The new interchange with SR 94 was completed in July 1976.[48] In August, the CHC announced that SR 75 south of SR 54 had been removed from the state highway plan.[49] The next year, the county supervisor, a San Diego City councilman, and the mayors of La Mesa and National City wrote a letter to then-Governor Jerry Brown to ask for the construction of this portion of SR 125 and other freeways, due to concerns about the types of congestion seen in Los Angeles coming to San Diego due to the incomplete freeway system.[50] San Diego City Councilman Tom Gade wrote a telegram to the Caltrans Director Adriana Gianturco about the possible deletions; in response, Gianturco clarified that the plans were only being reconsidered and had not been removed, and a CHC member criticized the tone of the original telegram, calling it "intemperate".[51]

In March 1980, the CPO approved the funding for the redesign of the interchange with I-8.[52] By early 1980, SR 125 was denoted with signs saying "To 94" at Grossmont Summit; plans were to provide access north to Fletcher Parkway in the revamp of the interchange.[53] On December 30, 1980, the City of Poway included SR 56 in the city plan extending east through the city to a northern extension of SR 125.[54]

By 1981, the environmental impact report had been completed on the proposed changes to the I-8 intersection, and the $50 million (about $190 million in 2013 dollars)[39] project to add ramps and widen I-8 was awaiting clearance from the Federal Highway Administration.[55] In 1983, both the cities of San Diego and Poway supported the extension of SR 56 to SR 67, although the City of Poway wanted the route moved and had reservations about the freeway ending in the city.[56]

In 1986, the project revamping the I-8 interchange was under way, at a cost of $80 million (about $222 million in 2013 dollars);[39] it would allow for SR 125 to be extended north past I-8.[57] That year, SR 125 was truncated to begin at SR 905, as the latter was formed as a route from I-5 to the border.[58]

Construction[edit]

The northernmost portion of the current SR 125 was built in stages. The portion from Fletcher Parkway to Amaya Drive was finished at the beginning of 2001, with a segment at Navajo Road to open later that year.[59] After weather-related construction delays due to the El Niño season of the winter of 1997–1998, the extension of SR 52 between Mission Gorge Road and SR 125 was dedicated on May 9, 1998.[60] The northernmost portion (north of Grossmont College Drive) was completed to SR 52 and Mission Gorge Road while the portion south of Grossmont College Drive.[61] This section was completed by 2004.[62]

SR 125 near Santee, CA

The first phase of the construction of the eastern portion of the SR 54 freeway corresponded with construction of SR 125 north of Jamacha Boulevard to SR 94; construction began in 1996 and was completed in 2003.[63][64]

The second phase consisted of the construction of the SR 125 toll road and opened on November 19, 2007. While California Transportation Ventures owned the franchise on the tolled portion of SR 125, the interchange with SR 54 was constructed with $160 million of public funding.[65] From 2005 to 2007, 1.5 million cubic meters of rock were blasted through in 160 separate explosions to allow for the interchange to be built.[66] The South Bay Expressway extended SR 125 southward from SR 54 to Otay Mesa. Construction of this portion was opposed by community and environmental groups.[67] This toll road was one of four privately financed toll highway projects, including the 91 Express Toll Lanes, that were approved in 1990.[68]

On March 22, 2010, the toll road's operator filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, citing traffic counts running at less than 40% of initial estimates due to the economic downturn.[69] At the time of the filing, the expressway had $510 million of loans outstanding, of which $170 million was owed to the U.S. Department of Transportation. In addition, according to the filing, there was over $600 million of unresolved litigation with the construction contractors. EBITDA for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009 was approximately $3 million on revenues of $21 million.[70] On July 29, 2011, SANDAG agreed to purchase the lease of the freeway from toll road operator, South Bay Expressway LLC;[71] the sale was finalized on December 16, 2011. SANDAG claimed at the time that they would reduce the tolls to attract increased use.[72] Due to toll reductions that were 25 to 40 percent less than their pre-public owned amounts, the number of vehicles using the toll portion of the expressway have increased by 19 percent as compared to the previous year.[73]

Tolls[edit]

Toll plazas are located along the South Bay Expressway at all northbound onramps and southbound offramps; there is also a mainline Otay Mesa Toll Plaza at the southern end of the facility just north of Otay Mesa Road.[7] The toll road is equipped with the FasTrak electronic toll collection system, with drivers being charged a prorated toll based on the distance traveled. Patrons paying by cash or credit card are charged a more expensive flat rate depending on which toll booth they pass through, using a barrier toll system, as opposed to a ticket system. For example, any cash- or credit-paying driver that passes through the Otay Mesa Toll Plaza ends up paying $3.50 regardless of the distance they actually traveled.[74][75]

The following table lists the toll rates for passenger cars, both with and without FasTrak (as of June 12, 2012). The toll rate is doubled for vehicles with more than two axles.[74]

Southern end of trip Northern end of trip Fastrak Cash/Credit
Otay Mesa Road SR 54 $2.75 $3.50
East H Street $2.00 $3.50
Birch Road, Olympic Parkway, or Otay Lakes Road $1.95 $3.50
Between Birch Road and East H Street $0.50 $2.50
Birch Road, Olympic Parkway, Otay Lakes Road, or East H Street SR 54 $1.70 $2.50
San Miguel Ranch Road $1.55 $2.00

Future[edit]

The proposal to extend SR 125 north into Poway was discussed as late as 2003 by a local advisory group working with the San Diego Association of Governments.[76] However, none of these proposals to extend SR 125 have been included in SANDAG's 2050 Regional Transportation Plan.[77]

Previously, SR 905 had a direct connection with SR 125 via two at-grade intersections on Otay Mesa Road.[7] With the completion of the newest freeway segment of SR 905 and the freeway-to-freeway connection to SR 125 unconstructed, traffic on SR 905 must exit at La Media Road (exit 7), head north on La Media and head east on Otay Mesa Road to make the connection.[6] A freeway-to-freeway interchange is planned for the connection between SR 125 and SR 905, and an additional interchange is planned for Heritage Road;[78] there are also plans to connect to the new SR 11 freeway once it is constructed. SR 11 is planned to be a toll facility that will serve a new border crossing east of Otay Mesa.[79]

Exit list[edit]

Except where prefixed with a letter, postmiles were measured on the road as it was in 1964, based on the alignment that existed at the time, and do not necessarily reflect current mileage. R reflects a realignment in the route since then, M indicates a second realignment, L refers an overlap due to a correction or change, and T indicates postmiles classified as temporary (for a full list of prefixes, see the list of postmile definitions).[1] Segments that remain unconstructed or have been relinquished to local control may be omitted. The entire route is in San Diego County.

Location Postmile
[1][14][80]
Exit
[81]
Destinations Notes
  L0.50 1 California 905.svg Otay Mesa Road to SR 905 Southbound exit and northbound entrance; south end of SR 125
San Diego   Otay Mesa Toll Plaza
Chula Vista 2.29 5 Birch Road
3.06 6 Olympic Parkway
4.04 7 Otay Lakes Road
5.08 8 East H Street
6.93 9 San Miguel Ranch Road, Mt. Miguel Road Southbound exit and northbound entrance
    North end of toll road
  9.59 11 SR 54 west (South Bay Freeway)
  9.90 12 Jamacha Boulevard, Paradise Valley Road (CR S17)
  10.62 13 Jamacha Road
Lemon Grove 12.97 15 SR 94 (Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway) Southbound exit to SR 94 east is via exit 17A
  13.50 17A Spring Street – La Mesa Northbound exit is via exit 15
La Mesa 14.74 17A Lemon Avenue Northbound exit and southbound entrance
R15.09 17B Grossmont Boulevard
R15.41 18A I‑8
18.66 18B Fletcher Parkway
El Cajon 19.53 20A Navajo Road
20.39 20B Grossmont College Drive
Santee 22.17 21 SR 52 – San Diego, Santee Northbound exit and southbound entrance; north end of SR 125
22.30 Mission Gorge Road At-grade intersection
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c California Department of Transportation. "State Truck Route List". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (XLS FILE) on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ Hawkins, Robert J. (April 14, 2011). "South Bay Expressway emerges from bankruptcy". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  3. ^ Hawkins, Robert J. (December 16, 2011). "SANDAG OKs purchase of South County toll road". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  4. ^ Hawkins, Robert J. (December 21, 2011). "SANDAG officially takes over South Bay toll road". San Diego Union -Tribune. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  5. ^ Sledge, Matt (December 27, 2011). "South Bay Expressway: Bankrupted Toll Road Tests Transportation Department Program". Huffington Post. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b Google (June 12, 2015). "State Route 125" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 12, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d Thomas Brothers (2009). San Diego County Road Atlas (Map). 1:22,800. Chicago: Rand McNally. pp. 1231, 1251, 1271, 1291, 1311, 1331, 1351. 
  8. ^ California State Legislature. "Streets and Highways Code Section 250–257". Sacramento: California State Legislature. Retrieved April 8, 2011. 
  9. ^ Federal Highway Administration (March 25, 2015). National Highway System: San Diego, CA (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved May 25, 2015. 
  10. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  11. ^ California State Legislature. "Streets and Highways Code Section 260-284". Sacramento: California State Legislature. Retrieved October 6, 2008. 
  12. ^ California Department of Transportation (September 7, 2011). "Officially Designated State Scenic Highways and Historic Parkways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  13. ^ California Department of Transportation (2012). Scenic Highway Guidelines (PDF). Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. p. 5. Retrieved July 29, 2012. 
  14. ^ a b California Department of Transportation (2013). "All Traffic Volumes on CSHS". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  15. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend sections 2, 3 and 5 and to add two sections to be numbered 6 and 7 to an act entitled 'An act to provide for the acquisition of rights of way for and the construction, maintenance...". Fiftieth Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 767. 
  16. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to establish a Streets and Highways Code, thereby consolidating and revising the law relating to public ways and all appurtenances thereto, and to repeal certain acts and parts of acts specified herein". Fifty-first Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 29. 
  17. ^ California Division of Highways (1938). Road Map of the State of California (Map). Scale not given. Sacramento: California Division of Highways. San Diego inset. Retrieved July 3, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Highway Needs Restatement Asked by Group". The San Diego Union. July 1, 1947. p. 4A. 
  19. ^ "Sen. Kraft Opposes Freeway 94 Route". The San Diego Union. July 25, 1953. p. A11. OCLC 13155544. 
  20. ^ Dekema, J. (November–December 1955). "Freeways in District XI". California Highways and Public Works 34 (11–12): 5–7. 
  21. ^ Luckenback, R.B.; Smith, C.; Estep, Al (July–August 1957). "San Diego Freeways". California Highways and Public Works 35 (7–8): 45. 
  22. ^ Dekema, Jacob (November–December 1958). "Report from District XI". California Highways and Public Works 37 (11–12): 46. 
  23. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 306, 320, 332, 351, 362, 365, 369, 374, 382, 388, 397, 407, 408, 409, 410, 415, 422, 435, 440, 446, 453, 456, 460, 467, 470, 476, 487, 492, 493, 494, 506, 521, 528, and 529...". 1959 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 1062. 
  24. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 253, 305, 308, 315, 316, 323, 326, 343, 354, 366, 368, 376, 399, 414, 415, 416, 468, 512, 513, 526, 572, 582, and 587, to amend and renumber Section 559, and to repeal Section 725.5...". 1961 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 1146. 
  25. ^ "Midway Freeway Route is Adopted". The San Diego Union. July 24, 1963. p. A17. 
  26. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to add Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) to Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, and to repeal Section 253 and Article 3 (commencing with Section 300) of Chapter 2 of Division 1 of, the...". 1963 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 385. 
  27. ^ "La Mesa Backs Freeway Route Near Parkway". The San Diego Union. January 31, 1964. p. A20. 
  28. ^ "Public, Experts Eye 4 Freeway Plans". The San Diego Union. March 24, 1964. p. A18. 
  29. ^ "State Proposes Freeway Route in South Bay". The San Diego Union. June 28, 1964. p. B3. 
  30. ^ "Womack Backs Westerly Route for Freeway". The San Diego Union. July 31, 1964. p. A20. 
  31. ^ "Revised Area Freeway OKd". The San Diego Union. July 22, 1965. p. A15. 
  32. ^ Stone, Joe (November 10, 1968). "La Mesa to Study Scenic Route Plan". The San Diego Union. p. B3. 
  33. ^ "State 125 Scenic Corridor Urged". The San Diego Union. November 6, 1970. p. B1. 
  34. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 263.3, 263.8, and 415 of, and to add Section 486 to, the Streets and Highways Code, relating to state highways". 1972 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 1216. 
  35. ^ "Freeway Priority Set Low". The San Diego Union. July 6, 1974. p. B3. 
  36. ^ "Legislation to Cut Road Project by 10 Miles Planned". The San Diego Union. December 25, 1974. p. B6. 
  37. ^ "Bid Opening Set on State 94". The San Diego Union. June 21, 1974. p. B2. OCLC 13155544. 
  38. ^ "Public's Mood Shifts Away From Freeways". The San Diego Union. January 8, 1974. p. X16. 
  39. ^ a b c United States nominal Gross Domestic Product per capita figures follow the Measuring Worth series supplied in Williamson, Samuel H. (2015). "What Was the U.S. GDP Then?". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved April 15, 2015.  These figures follow the figures as of 2013.
  40. ^ "New State 94 Interchange is Open". The San Diego Union. July 20, 1976. p. B3. OCLC 13155544. 
  41. ^ Staff (January 19, 1974). "Chula Vista Scenic Roads Plan Studied". The San Diego Union. p. B2. 
  42. ^ Staff (May 26, 1974). "Scenic Route Plan OK Voted". The San Diego Union. p. B3. 
  43. ^ Staff (July 25, 1974). "City Asks Interchange Construction". The San Diego Union. p. B3. OCLC 13155544. 
  44. ^ Staff (January 18, 1975). "Poll Asks Stand on State 125". The San Diego Union. p. B3. 
  45. ^ "CPO Backs Freeway Plan". The San Diego Union. January 21, 1975. p. B3. 
  46. ^ Staff (February 5, 1975). "Assembly Unit Cuts Work on State 125". The San Diego Union. p. B8. 
  47. ^ Harrison, Donald (March 18, 1975). "CPO Selects Otay Mesa Site for Future Regional Airport". The San Diego Union. p. B1. 
  48. ^ "New State 94 Interchange is Open". The San Diego Union. July 20, 1976. p. B3. 
  49. ^ "Plans for 10-Mile State Highway to Border Eliminated". The San Diego Union. August 10, 1976. p. B3. 
  50. ^ "Added Freeway Projects Sought". The San Diego Union. April 26, 1977. p. B4. 
  51. ^ Harrison, Donald (July 24, 1977). "State Aide Protests Gade Words". The San Diego Union. p. H16. 
  52. ^ "CPO Approves $1 Billion Rail, Road Program". The San Diego Union. March 18, 1980. p. B2. 
  53. ^ Spiller, Virginia (March 24, 1980). "Key Road Project in La Mesa". The San Diego Union. p. B2. 
  54. ^ Taylor, Rivian (December 31, 1980). "Poway Council Includes Route 56 in General Plan". The San Diego Union. p. 3. OCLC 13155544. 
  55. ^ Staff (May 20, 1981). "Interchange Project Nears Green Light". The San Diego Union. p. B3. OCLC 13155544. 
  56. ^ Pimentel, Ricardo (January 20, 1983). "San Diego, Poway Back Proposed Freeway". The San Diego Union. p. B3. OCLC 13155544. 
  57. ^ Taylor, Kathie (December 5, 1986). "Detour-sign watchers have field day at interchange". Evening Tribune. p. B22. OCLC 37687666. 
  58. ^ California State Assembly. "An act to amend Sections 318, 341, 343, 360, 366, 370, 374, 388, 389, 403, 425, 468, 548, 624, 2104, and 2107 of, to add Section 632 to, and to repeal Sections 322.1, 355.1, 417, and 622.2 of, the Streets...". 1985–1986 Session of the Legislature. Statutes of California. State of California. Ch. 928. 
  59. ^ "Stretch of Route 125 to Open Today, Others Later". San Diego Union-Tribune. January 3, 2001. p. B2. 
  60. ^ Arner, Mark (May 8, 1998). "New freeway between Santee and La Mesa to be opened in stages". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B4. OCLC 25257675. 
  61. ^ Arner, Mark (May 8, 1998). "New Freeway Between Santee and La Mesa to be Opened in Stages". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B4. 
  62. ^ Ristine, Jeff (July 11, 2004). "Is Tax Near End of Road?". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B1. 
  63. ^ Barfield, Chet (August 1, 1996). "Building begins on Route 125 segment". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B7. 
  64. ^ Krueger, Anne (May 7, 2003). "Route 125 connection". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B1. 
  65. ^ Schmidt, Steve (November 20, 2007). "Drivers Say Tollway is on Road to Success". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B1. 
  66. ^ Graham, David (March 5, 2007). "Route 54 bridge blasting complete". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B3. 
  67. ^ Luzzaro, Susan (November 18, 2009). "Nine Miles of Nothing". San Diego Reader. Retrieved September 13, 2014. 
  68. ^ Roach, Ron (September 15, 1990). "State Approves Toll Highway for Otay Mesa". Evening Tribune (San Diego). p. B1. 
  69. ^ Schmidt, Steve (March 23, 2010). "Toll road operator files for Chapter 11". San Diego Union-Tribune. 
  70. ^ "Declaration in support of Chapter 11 petition and first day motions" (PDF). March 22, 2010. Retrieved July 3, 2015. 
  71. ^ Nathan Max (July 29, 2011). "SANDAG set to take over South Bay Expressway". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved July 30, 2011. 
  72. ^ Robert J. Hawkins (December 16, 2012). "SANDAG OKs purchase of South County toll road". Retrieved March 4, 2012. 
  73. ^ Fry, Wendy (July 17, 2012). "Chula Vista Toll Decreases, Traffic Increases". NBC San Diego. Archived from the original on July 3, 2015. Retrieved July 22, 2012. 
  74. ^ a b "South Bay Expressway Toll Schedule". San Diego Association of Governments. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 3, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2013. 
  75. ^ San Diego Association of Governments. "FAQ". South Bay Expressway. San Diego Association of Governments. Archived from the original on July 2, 2015. Retrieved July 2, 2015. 
  76. ^ Ristine, Jeff (December 13, 2003). "Old Ideas Come Round for Travelling North–South". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. NC-2. 
  77. ^ "SANDAG 2050 Regional Transportation Plan". San Diego Association of Governments. October 28, 2011. Retrieved June 12, 2015. 
  78. ^ Kuhney, Jen (July 19, 2012). "New Freeway Segment at Border Celebrated". U-T San Diego. p. B2. 
  79. ^ Staff (January 11, 2011). "Hearing Set on Border Highway and Crossing". San Diego Union-Tribune. p. B2. 
  80. ^ California Department of Transportation (July 2007). "Log of Bridges on State Highways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. 
  81. ^ Howe, Don (November 1, 2007). "SR 125 Northbound" (PDF). Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 5, 2009. 
    Howe, Don (November 1, 2007). "SR 125 Southbound" (PDF). Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 5, 2009. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing