Carex firma

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Carex firma
Carex firma 060707.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Clade: Commelinids
Order: Poales
Family: Cyperaceae
Genus: Carex
Subgenus: Carex subg. Carex
Section: Carex sect. Frigidae
Species:
C. firma
Binomial name
Carex firma

Carex firma is a species of sedge that grows in the mountains of southern and central Europe.

Description[edit]

"Caricetum firmae" community in the Austrian Allgäuer Alpen, including species such as Carex firma, Chamorchis alpina, Dryas octopetala, Gentiana clusii and Primula auricula

Carex firma forms thick cushions. Its leaves are up to 8 centimetres (3.1 in) long in normal conditions (up to 10 cm or 4 in in moist, sheltered localities), dark green and stiff.[1] The stems are up to 20 cm (7.9 in) tall (exceptionally 30 cm or 12 in), but always at least twice as long as the leaves.[1]

Ecology[edit]

In synecology, Carex firma is a characteristic part of the "Caricetum firmae" (also called "Firmetum"), which is an important community in the alpine zone over calcareous rock.[2]

Carex firma can survive temperatures as low as −50 °C (−58 °F).[3]

Taxonomy[edit]

Carex firma was first described by Nicolaus Thomas Host in 1797, in his work Synopsis Plantarum in Austria provinciisque adjacentibus sponte crescentium.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b M. A. Fischer, W. Adler & K. Oswald (2005). "Segge, Riedgras / Carex (inkl. Vignea)". Exkursionsflora für Österreich, Liechtenstein und Südtirol (in German) (2nd ed.). Land Oberösterreich, Biologiezentrum des OÖ Landesmuseum, Linz. pp. 1093–1119. ISBN 3-85474-140-5.
  2. ^ M. A. Fischer, W. Adler & K. Oswald (2005). "Standorts- und Vegetationsökologie". Exkursionsflora für Österreich, Liechtenstein und Südtirol (in German) (2nd ed.). Land Oberösterreich, Biologiezentrum des OÖ Landesmuseum, Linz. pp. 127–135. ISBN 3-85474-140-5.
  3. ^ Ökke Atıcıa & Barbaros Nalbantoğlu (2003). "Antifreeze proteins in higher plants". Phytochemistry. 64 (7): 1187–1196. doi:10.1016/S0031-9422(03)00420-5.
  4. ^ Nicolaus Thomas Host (1797). "Carex". Synopsis Plantarum in Austria provinciisque adjacentibus sponte crescentium. Vienna, Austria: Christian Friedrich Wappler. pp. 502–512.

External links[edit]