Charles Ritchie (priest)

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Charles Henry Ritchie
Born 28 May 1887
Died 8 September 1958 (aged 71)
Polzeath, Cornwall
Education
Spouse(s) Marjorie Alice Stewart
Children 2 sons
Parent(s) John Macfarlane Ritchie
and Ella Ritchie
Religion Anglican
Ordained 1911 (deacon); 1912 (priest)
Offices held
Title The Reverend Canon

Charles Henry Ritchie (1887–1958) was an Anglican clergyman who served in both the Church of England and the Scottish Episcopal Church.

Life[edit]

Born on 28 May 1887, he was the youngest son of John Macfarlane Ritchie and Ella Ritchie, of Dunedin, New Zealand.[1] He was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School, Wanganui, New Zealand; St John's College, Cambridge (B.A. 1910; M.A. 1914); and Leeds Clergy School (1910).[1][2] He was ordained in the Anglican ministry as a deacon in 1911 and a priest in 1912.[1][2] His first pastoral appointment was a curate at St. Michael's, Chester Square, London, 1911–14.[1][2] In 1915, he married Marjorie Alice Stewart, youngest daughter of Sir Charles and Lady Mary Stewart.[1] During the First World War, he served as an acting chaplain for temporary service in the Royal Navy, 1914–19.[1][2] After the war, he was briefly a curate at All Saints' Church, Dunedin, New Zealand, 1920–22,[1][2] before returning to England where was a curate at St Martin-in-the-Fields, London, 1922–27.[1][2] He served as the Rector of St John's, Edinburgh, 1927–39,[1][3] and a canon of St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh, 1937–39.[1][2] He was then Archdeacon of Northumberland, 1939–54, and a canon of St Nicholas' Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne, 1939–54.[1][2] Followed by as a canon of St George’s Chapel, Windsor, 1954–58.[1] He also served as a chaplain to King George VI and then to Queen Elizabeth II, and a chaplain to Heathfield School, Ascot.[1] He died in Polzeath, Cornwall on 8 September 1958, aged 71.[1][4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Ritchie, Rev. Canon Charles Henry. ukwhoswho.com. Who Was Who. 1920–2014 (April 2014 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 30 May 2014.  closed access publication – behind paywall
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Bertie 2000, Scottish Episcopal Clergy, p. 417.
  3. ^ Bertie 2000, Scottish Episcopal Clergy, pp. 417 and 571.
  4. ^ "Calendar of Wills and Probate". probatesearch.service.gov.uk. 1958. p. 237. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 

References[edit]

  • Bertie, David M. (2000). Scottish Episcopal Clergy, 1689–2000. Edinburgh: T & T Clark. ISBN 0567087468. 
Scottish Episcopal Church titles
Preceded by
James Geoffrey Gordon
Rector of St John's, Edinburgh
1927 – 1939
Succeeded by
Sidney Harvie-Clark
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Leslie Stannard Hunter
Archdeacon of Northumberland
1939 – 1954
Succeeded by
Ian Hugh White-Thomson