Chestnut teal

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Chestnut teal
Male chestnut teal.jpg
Male
Female Chestnut Teal duck.jpg
Female
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Genus: Anas
Species: A. castanea
Binomial name
Anas castanea
(Eyton, 1838)

The chestnut teal (Anas castanea) is a dabbling duck found in Australia. It is protected under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

Taxonomy[edit]

The chestnut teal was described by the English naturalist Thomas Campbell Eyton in 1838 under the binomial name Mareca castanea.[2] The specific epithet castanea is from the Latin castaneus for "chestnut-coloured" or "chestnut-brown".[3]

A large molecular phylogentic study that compared mitochondrial DNA sequences from ducks, geese and swans in the family Anatidae found that the chestnut teal is a sister species to the Sunda teal (Anas gibberifrons) that is endemic to Indonesia.[4]

Description[edit]

The chestnut teal is darker and a slightly bigger bird than the grey teal.[5]

The male has a distinctive green coloured head and mottled brown body. The female has a brown head and mottled brown body. The female is almost identical in appearance to the grey teal.

The female chestnut teal has a loud penetrating "laughing" quack repeated rapidly nine times or more.[5]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Female and 6 ducklings, including 2 albinos (Tasmania)

The chestnut teal is commonly distributed in south-eastern and south-western Australia, while vagrants may occur elsewhere. Tasmania and southern Victoria are the species’ stronghold,[5] while vagrants can be found as far north as New Guinea and Lord Howe Island.[6]

The chestnut teal prefers coastal estuaries and wetlands, and is indifferent to salinity. This bird is an omnivore.

Breeding[edit]

Chestnut teals form monogamous pairs that stay together outside the breeding season, defend the nest site and look after the young when hatched. Nests are usually located over water, in a down-lined tree hollow about 6–10 m high. Sometimes nests are placed on the ground, among clumps of grass near water. The young hatch and are ready to swim and walk within a day.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Anas castanea". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Eyton, Thomas Campbell. A Monograph on the Anatidae, or Duck Tribe. London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longman. p. 119. 
  3. ^ Jobling, James A. (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. p. 93. ISBN 978-1-4081-2501-4. 
  4. ^ Gonzalez, J.; Düttmann, H.; Wink, M. (2009). "Phylogenetic relationships based on two mitochondrial genes and hybridization patterns in Anatidae". Journal of Zoology. 279: 310–318. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00622.x. 
  5. ^ a b c "Chestnut Teal". Victoria State Government: Game Management Authority. Retrieved 9 August 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "Chestnut Teal". Birds in Backyards. Retrieved 27 January 2012. 

External links[edit]