Chinese Garden MRT station

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 EW25 
Chinese Garden
裕华园
சீனத் தோட்டம்
Chinese Garden
Rapid transit
Chinesegarden-mrt.JPG
Platform of Chinese Garden MRT station with a westbound train in the background.
Location 151 Boon Lay Way
Singapore 609959
Coordinates 1°20′33.76″N 103°43′56.88″E / 1.3427111°N 103.7324667°E / 1.3427111; 103.7324667
Operated by SMRT Trains (SMRT Corporation)
Line(s)
Platforms Island
Tracks 2
Connections Bus, Taxi
Construction
Structure type Elevated
Platform levels 1
Disabled access Yes
Other information
Station code  EW25 
History
Opened 5 November 1988; 29 years ago (1988-11-05)
Electrified Yes
Previous names Jurong Lake
Services
Preceding station   Mass Rapid Transit   Following station
towards Pasir Ris
East West line
towards Tuas Link
Location

Chinese Garden MRT station (EW25) is an above-ground Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) station on the East West Line in Jurong East, Singapore. It primarily serves the residential estate of Yuhua, as well as the various tourist attractions in Jurong Lake, including the Chinese Garden, where the station derived its name from.

The roof of Chinese Garden station is based on traditional Chinese architectural design.[1]

History[edit]

The station was opened on 5 November 1988, as part of the first portion of Phase 2 of the MRT system.[2]

As with most of the stations along the East West Line, it was built without platform screen doors to prevent commuters from falling onto the train tracks. After several successful test at Jurong East, Yishun and Pasir Ris and eventually, installation of the half-height platform screen doors started on 14 August 2010 and operations commenced on 1 October 2010.[3]

The station was installed with high-volume low-speed fans, which commenced operations on 16 November 2012[citation needed].

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MRT station roofs to show Singapore's cultural mix". The Straits Times. 13 April 1987. Retrieved 20 October 2017 – via NewspaperSG. 
  2. ^ "Three more stations for MRT system". The Business Times. 5 November 1988. Retrieved 20 October 2017 – via NewspaperSG. 
  3. ^ Wong, Siew Ying (January 26, 2008). "Above-ground MRT stations to have platform screen doors by 2012". Channel NewsAsia. Archived from the original on July 30, 2012. Retrieved February 1, 2012. 

External links[edit]