Chris Barrie (admiral)

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Chris Barrie
Chris Barrie (7006248205) (cropped).jpg
Barrie at the Climate Security Conference in London, March 2012.
Born (1945-05-29) 29 May 1945 (age 74)
Marrickville, New South Wales
AllegianceAustralia
Service/branchRoyal Australian Navy
Years of service1961–2002
RankAdmiral
Commands heldChief of the Defence Force (1998–02)
Vice Chief of the Defence Force (1997–98)
Deputy Chief of Navy (1995–97)
HMAS Watson (1991–92)
HMAS Stuart (1983–84)
HMAS Buccaneer (1969–70)
Battles/warsIndonesia–Malaysia confrontation
Vietnam War
AwardsCompanion of the Order of Australia
Distinguished Service Order (Military) (Singapore)
Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)

Admiral Christopher Alexander Barrie, AC (born 29 May 1945) is a retired senior officer of the Royal Australian Navy, who served as Chief of the Defence Force from 4 July 1998 to 3 July 2002.

Early life[edit]

Barrie was born in the Sydney suburb of Marrickville, New South Wales, on 29 May 1945 to Alexander William Barrie and Dorothy Clare Chrystal. He was educated at North Sydney Boys High School, and entered the Royal Australian Naval College as a cadet midshipman in 1961.[1][2]

Naval career[edit]

During his early naval training, Barrie completed service on HMA Ships Anzac, Vampire and Melbourne,[1] which included service in the Indonesia-Malaysia confrontation, and a 23-day tour of duty in Vietnam. Postings to the Britannia Royal Naval College at Dartmouth and HMS Excellent followed.

Barrie served at sea as part of the commissioning crew of HMAS Brisbane, which included a seven-month tour of duty in Vietnam, during 1969. He also served as Commanding Officer HMAS Buccaneer from 1969 to 1970, Operations and Navigating Officer on HMS Eastbourne, HMAS Perth and HMAS Duchess, Executive Officer on HMAS Vampire, and later as Commanding Officer HMAS Stuart from 1983 to 1984.

In 1990 to 1991, Barrie held an appointment as Defence Adviser, New Delhi, India. Following this post, he was promoted commodore and served as Director RAN Surface Warfare School and Commanding Officer HMAS Watson from 1991 to 1992. He was appointed Deputy Maritime Commander and Chief of Staff at Maritime Headquarters in Sydney from 1992 to 1995, for which he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 1994.[3] On promotion to rear admiral, Barrie served as Deputy Chief of Naval Staff, before being appointed Vice Chief of the Defence Force with the rank of vice admiral in March 1997. The following year, Barrie was advanced to Officer of the Order of Australia in recognition of his "distinguished service" in the latter two postings.[4]

Barrie was promoted to admiral, and assumed the post of Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) on 4 July 1998. He held this position until his retirement, and for his "eminent service to the Australian Defence Force" was further advanced to Companion of the Order of Australia in 2001 and awarded the Distinguished Service Order (Military) by the government of Singapore.[5][2] As CDF, Barrie became involved in the "Children Overboard Affair" of 2001, a high-level political controversy which occurred during the Australian federal election campaign. Barrie was the last Australian Government official to publicly support Prime Minister John Howard's assertion that refugees had thrown their children overboard from their sinking vessel.[6] Barrie retired on 3 July 2002,[1] and was succeeded as CDF by General Peter Cosgrove.

A graduate of the Britannia Royal Naval College, Barrie completed through part-time study a Bachelor of Arts with majors in International Relations and Politics in 1983 and was conferred a Master of Business Administration in 1996 by Deakin University.[1] He was made a Commander of the Legion of Merit by the United States in 2003.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Admiral Christopher Alexander Barrie". Biographies. Royal Australian Navy. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Adm. Christopher Alexander Barrie". Who's Who in Australia Online. ConnectWeb. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  3. ^ It's an Honour – Member of the Order of Australia – 26 January 1994
    Citation: In recognition of service to the Royal Australian Navy, particularly as Deputy Maritime Commander and Chief of Staff, Maritime HQ.
  4. ^ It's an Honour – Officer of the Order of Australia – 8 June 1998
    Citation: For distinguished service to the Australian Defence Force as Deputy Chief of Naval Staff and Vice Chief of the Defence Force.
  5. ^ It's an Honour – Companion of the Order of Australia – 26 January 2001
    Citation: For eminent service to the Australian Defence Force as Chief of the Defence Force.
  6. ^ Australian Broadcasting Corporation '7:30 Report' TV program transcript, 27-02-2002.

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
General John Baker
Chief of the Defence Force
1998–2002
Succeeded by
General Peter Cosgrove
Preceded by
Vice Admiral Robert Walls
Vice Chief of the Defence Force
1997–1998
Succeeded by
Air Marshal Douglas Riding
Preceded by
Rear Admiral David Campbell
Deputy Chief of Naval Staff
1995–1997
Succeeded by
Rear Admiral Chris Oxenbould