Cricket statistics

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Cricket is a sport that generates a large number of statistics.

Statistics are recorded for each player during a match, and aggregated over a career. At the professional level, statistics for Test cricket, one-day internationals, and first-class cricket are recorded separately. However, since Test matches are a form of first-class cricket, a player's first-class statistics will include his Test match statistics – but not vice versa. Nowadays records are also maintained for List A and Twenty20 limited over matches. These matches are normally limited over games played domestically at the national level by leading Test nations. Since one-day internationals are a form of List A limited over matches, a player's List A statistics will include his ODI match statistics – but not vice versa.

Batting statistics[edit]

  • Innings (I): The number of innings in which the batsman actually batted.
  • Not outs (NO): The number of times the batsman was not out at the conclusion of an innings they batted in.1
  • Runs (R): The number of runs scored.
  • Highest score (HS/Best): The highest score ever made by the batsman.
  • Batting average (Ave): The total number of runs divided by the total number of innings in which the batsman was out. Ave = Runs/[I – NO] (also Avge or Avg.)
  • Centuries (100): The number of innings in which the batsman scored one hundred runs or more.
  • Half-centuries (50): The number of innings in which the batsman scored fifty to ninety-nine runs (centuries do not count as half-centuries as well).
  • Balls faced (BF): The total number of balls received, including no balls but not including wides.
  • Strike rate (SR): The average number of runs scored per 100 balls faced. (SR = [100 * Runs]/BF)
  • Run rate (RR): The average number of runs a batsman (or the batting side) scores in an over of 6 balls.
  • Net run rate (NRR): A method of ranking teams with equal points in limited overs league competitions.

1 Batsmen who are not required to bat in a particular innings (due to victory or declaration) are not considered "Not Out" in that innings. Only the player/s who have taken to the crease and remained there until the completion of an innings, are marked "Not Out" on the scorecard. For statistical purposes, batsmen who retire due to injury or illness are also deemed not out [1], while batsmen who retire for any other reason are deemed out [2], except in exceptional circumstances (in 1983 Gordon Greenidge, not out on 154, departed a Test match to be with his daughter, who was ill and subsequently died – he was subsequently deemed not out [3] the only such decision in the history of Test cricket).

Session 2016 Test Most runs[edit]

Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Bol Ca.run Sr 100/50 Ave
451 3 5 South Africa Hashim Amla 955 7358 47.22 2/1 90.20
385 3 5 England Ben Stokes 329 1383 117.02 1/1 77.00
289 3 6 England Joe Root 444 3406 65.09 1/2 57.80
239 3 5 England Jonny Bairstow 366 1204 65.30 1/0 79.66
238 3 5 South Africa Temba Bavuma 414 383 57.48 1/1 79.33
177 3 6 England AN Cook 386 9964 45.85 0/1 29.50
176 2* 1 Australia Adam Voges 286 1028 61.53 1/0 0.00
143 2 3 South Africa Quinton de Kock 147 407 97.27 1/0 143.00
140 2* 1 Australia Usman Khawaja 216 881 64.81 1/0 140.00
140 1 2 South Africa Stephen Cook 287 140 48.78 1/0 70.00
Last updated: 13 February 2016[1]

Session 2016 ODI Most runs[edit]

Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Bol Ca.run Sr 100/50 Ave
441 5 5 India Rohit Sharma 434 5008 101.61 2/1 110.25
381 5 5 India Virat Kohli 384 7212 99.21 2/2 76.20
343 6 6 New Zealand Martin Guptill 342 4785 100.29 1/2 57.16
335 7 7 Australia Steven Smith 322 2061 104.03 1/1 47.85
330 5 5 Australia David Warner 305 2521 108.19 1/2 66.00
287 5 5 India Shikhar Dhawan 286 3078 100.34 1/2 57.40
233 6 6 Australia Mitchell Marsh 229 829 101.74 1/1 77.66
229 7 7 Australia George Bailey 231 2465 99.13 1/1 38.16
227 6 6 New Zealand Kane Williamson 269 3648 84.38 0/3 37.83
219 3 3 Zimbabwe Hamilton Masakadza 289 4649 75.77 1/1 73.00
Last updated: 7 february 2016[2]

Session 2016 T20 Most runs[edit]

Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Bol Ca.run Sr 100/50 Ave
318 6 6 Zimbabwe Hamilton Masakadza 221 1320 143.89 0/3 63.60
260 5 5 New Zealand Kane Williamson 205 844 126.82 0/3 86.66
252 5 5 New Zealand Martin Guptill 139 1666 181.29 0/3 63.00
199 3 3 India Virat Kohli 124 1215 160.48 0/3 199.00
177 6 6 Zimbabwe Malcolm Waller 108 467 163.88 0/0 35.40
151 2 2 Afghanistan Mohammad Shahzad 84 1111 179.76 1/0 151.00
151 3 3 Australia Shane Watson 92 1315 164.13 1/0 75.50
146 5 4 New Zealand Colin Munro 70 382 208.57 0/2 48.66
143 3 3 India Rohit Sharma 105 1010 136.19 0/2 47.66
140 4 4 Bangladesh Sabbir Rahman 102 281 137.25 0/1 46.66
Last updated: 30 January 2016[3]

Most runs[edit]

Test Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Bol 2016 Sr 100/50 Ave
15921 200 329 India Sachin Tendulkar - - - 51/68 53.78
13378 168 287 Australia Ricky Ponting 22782 - 58.72 41/62 51.85
13289 166 280 South Africa Jacques Kallis 28903 - 45.97 45/58 55.37
13288 164 286 India Rahul Dravid 31258 - 42.51 36/63 52.31
12400 134 233 Sri Lanka Kumar Sangakkara 22882 - 54.19 38/52 57.40
11953 131 232 West Indies Cricket Board Brian Lara 19753 - 60.51 34/48 52.88
11867 164 280 West Indies Cricket Board Shivnarine Chanderpaul 27395 - 43.31 30/66 51.37
11814 149 252 Sri Lanka Mahela Jayawardene 22959 - 51.45 34/50 49.84
11174 156 265 Australia Allan Border - - - 27/63 50.56
10927 168 260 Australia Steve Waugh 22461 - 48.64 32/50 51.06
Last updated: 24 January 2016[4]

ODI Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Bol 2016 Sr 100/50 Ave
18426 463 452 India Sachin Tendulkar 21367 - 86.23 49/96 44.83
14234 404 380 Sri Lanka Kumar Sangakkara 18048 - 78.86 25/93 41.98
13704 375 365 Australia Ricky Ponting 17046 - 80.39 30/82 42.03
13430 445 433 Sri Lanka Sanath Jayasuriya 14725 - 91.20 28/68 32.36
12650 448 418 Sri Lanka Mahela Jayawardene 16020 - 78.96 19/77 33.37
11739 378 350 Pakistan Inzamam-ul-Haq 15812 - 74.24 10/83 39.52
11579 328 314 South Africa Jacques Kallis 15885 - 72.89 17/86 44.36
11363 311 300 India Sourav Ganguly 15416 - 73.70 22/72 41.02
10889 344 318 India Rahul Dravid 15284 - 71.24 12/83 39.16
10405 299 289 West Indies Cricket Board Brian Lara 13086 - 79.51 19/63 40.48
Last updated: 24 January 2016[5]

T20 Top 10

Runs Ma In Player Ball 2016 Sr 100/50 Ave
2140 71 70 New Zealand Brendon McCullum 1571 - 136.21 2/13 35.66
1666 57 55 New Zealand Martin Guptill 1285 252 129.64 1/9 34.70
1618 68 67 Sri Lanka Tillakaratne Dilshan 1341 28 120.65 1/11 28.38
1528 63 58 South Africa Jean-Paul Duminy 1247 - 122.53 0/8 38.20
1514 71 69 Pakistan Mohammad Hafeez 1318 82 114.87 0/8 22.93
1506 71 68 Pakistan Umar Akmal 1212 85 124.25 0/7 26.89
1493 55 55 Sri Lanka Mahela Jayawardene 1121 - 133.18 1/9 31.76
1465 54 54 Australia David Warner 1055 17 138.86 0/11 28.72
1406 45 43 West Indies Cricket Board Chris Gayle 986 - 142.59 1/13 35.15
1382 56 53 Sri Lanka Kumar Sangakkara 1156 - 119.55 0/8 31.40
Last updated: 24 January 2016[6]

Bowling statistics[edit]

  • Overs (O): The number of overs bowled.
  • Balls (B): The number of balls bowled. Overs is more traditional, but balls is a more useful statistic because the number of balls per over has varied historically.
  • Maiden overs (M): The number of maiden overs (overs in which the bowler conceded zero runs) bowled.
  • Runs (R): The number of runs conceded.
  • Wickets (W): The number of wickets taken.
  • Bowling analysis (BA or OMRW): A shorthand notation consisting of a bowler's Overs, Maidens, Runs conceded and Wickets taken (in that order), usually for a single innings but sometimes for other periods. For example, an analysis of 10–3–27–2 would indicate that the player bowled ten overs, of which three were maidens, conceded 27 runs and took two wickets.
  • No balls (Nb): The number of no balls bowled.
  • Wides (Wd): The number of wides bowled.
  • Bowling average (Ave): The average number of runs conceded per wicket. (Ave = Runs/W)
  • Strike rate (SR): The average number of balls bowled per wicket taken. (SR = Balls/W)
  • Economy rate (Econ): The average number of runs conceded per over. (Econ = Runs/Overs bowled).
  • Best bowling (BB): The bowler's best bowling performance, defined as firstly the greatest number of wickets, secondly the fewest runs conceded for that number of wickets. (Thus, a performance of 7 for 102 is considered better than one of 6 for 19.)
    • BBI stands for Best Bowling in Innings and only gives the score for one innings. (If only the BB rate is given it's considered the BBI rate.)
    • BBM stands for Best Bowling in Match and gives the combined score over 2 or more innings in one match. (For limited-overs matches with one innings per side, this score is equal to the BBI or BB.)
  • Five wickets in an innings (5w): The number of innings in which the bowler took at least five wickets. Four wickets in an innings (4w), the number of innings in which the bowler took exactly four wickets, is sometimes recorded alongside five wickets, especially in limited overs cricket.
  • Ten wickets in a match (10w): The number of matches in which the bowler took at least ten wickets; recorded for Tests and first-class matches only.

Representation: Bowler <No. of overs> – <No. of maidens> – <No. of runs conceded> – <No. of wickets taken>

Session 2016 Test Most Wickets[edit]

Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Overs CAW Sr Run Ave
22 3 6 South Africa Kagiso Rabada 109.4 24 29.09 482 21.90
13 3 5 England Stuart Broad 111.1 333 51.03 317 24.38
11 3 5 England Ben Stokes 97.1 57 53.00 299 27.18
10 3 6 South Africa Morne Morkel 105.2 242 63.02 332 33.20
7 3 5 England James Anderson 118.2 433 101.04 301 43.00
5 2 3 England Steven Finn 60.0 113 72.00 196 39.20
4 2 4 South Africa Dane Piedt 74.0 22 111.00 239 59.75
4 2 4 South Africa Chris Morris 61.0 4 91.05 253 63.25
3 1 1 Australia Steve O'Keefe 26.1 7 52.03 63 21.00
3 1 1 Australia Nathan Lyon 46.0 185 92.00 120 40.00
Last updated: 24 January 2016[7]

Session 2016 ODI Most Wickets[edit]

Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Overs CAW Sr Run Ave
13 5 5 New Zealand Trent Boult 42.4 59 19.06 247 19.00
12 6 5 New Zealand Matt Henry 44.0 48 22.00 225 18.75
11 6 6 Australia John Hastings 58.0 22 31.06 296 26.90
10 3 3 Zimbabwe Luke Jongwe 19.1 25 11.05 78 7.80
9 4 4 India Ishant Sharma 40.0 115 26.06 250 27.77
8 6 5 New Zealand Mitchell Santner 32.2 15 24.02 193 24.12
7 3 3 Afghanistan Amir Hamza 29.5 32 25.05 107 15.28
7 3 3 Zimbabwe Neville Madziva 20.4 20 17.07 110 15.71
7 3 3 Afghanistan Dawlat Zadran 29.3 57 25.02 150 21.42
7 6 6 Australia Mitchell Marsh 43.0 26 36.08 262 37.42
Last updated: 7 February 2016[8]

Session 2016 T20 Most Wickets[edit]

Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Overs CAW Sr Run Ave
10 4 4 New Zealand Adam Milne 15.1 18 9.01 118 11.80
10 6 6 Zimbabwe Graeme Cremer 23.0 32 13.08 158 15.80
9 5 4 New Zealand Grant Elliott 12.0 11 8.00 83 9.22
8 4 4 Scotland Safyaan Sharif 12.2 20 9.02 77 9.62
7 4 4 Scotland Mark Watt 13.0 11 11.01 90 12.85
6 3 3 India Jasprit Bumrah 11.3 6 11.05 103 17.16
6 4 4 Zimbabwe Tendai Chisoro 16.0 10 16.00 105 17.50
5 2 2 Afghanistan Dawlat Zadran 7.0 30 8.04 53 10.60
5 4 4 New Zealand Mitchell Santner 12.0 7 14.04 74 14.80
5 3 3 India Ravindra Jadeja 12.0 19 14.04 94 18.80
Last updated: 7 February 2016[9]

Most Wickets[edit]

Test Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Boll 2016W Sr Run Ave
800 133 230 Sri Lanka Muttiah Muralitharan 44039 - 55.00 18180 22.72
708 145 273 Australia Shane Warne 40705 - 57.04 17995 25.41
619 132 236 India Anil Kumble 40850 - 65.09 18355 29.65
563 124 243 Australia Glenn McGrath 29248 - 51.09 12186 21.64
519 132 242 West Indies Cricket Board Courtney Walsh 30019 - 57.08 12688 24.44
434 131 227 India Kapil Dev 27740 - 63.09 12867 29.64
433 113 212 England James Anderson 25185 7 58.01 12638 29.18
431 86 150 New Zealand Sir Richard Hadlee 21918 - 50.08 9611 22.29
421 108 202 South Africa Shaun Pollock 24353 - 57.08 9733 23.11
417 103 190 India Harbhajan Singh 28580 - 68.05 13537 32.46
Last updated: 24 January 2016[10]

ODI Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Boll 2016W Sr Run Ave
534 350 341 Sri Lanka Muttiah Muralitharan 18811 - 35.02 12326 23.08
502 356 351 Pakistan Wasim Akram 18186 - 36.02 11812 23.52
416 262 258 Pakistan Waqar Younis 12698 - 30.05 9919 23.84
400 322 320 Sri Lanka Chaminda Vaas 15775 - 39.04 11014 27.53
395 398 372 Pakistan Shahid Afridi 17670 - 44.07 13632 34.51
393 303 297 South Africa Shaun Pollock 15712 - 39.09 9631 24.50
381 250 248 Australia Glenn McGrath 12970 - 34.00 8391 22.02
380 221 217 Australia Brett Lee 11185 - 29.04 8877 23.36
337 271 265 India Anil Kumble 14496 - 43.00 10412 30.89
323 445 368 Sri Lanka Sanath Jayasuriya 14874 - 46.00 11871 36.75
Last updated: 24 January 2016[11]

T20 Top 10

Wickets Ma In Player Boll 2016W Sr Run Ave
91 90 89 Pakistan Shahid Afridi 1976 3 21.07 2175 23.90
85 60 60 Pakistan Umar Gul 1203 2 14.01 1443 16.97
85 64 63 Pakistan Saeed Ajmal 1430 - 16.08 1516 17.83
74 61 61 Sri Lanka Lasith Malinga 1283 - 17.03 1556 21.02
66 39 39 Sri Lanka Ajantha Mendis 885 - 13.04 952 14.42
65 56 55 England Stuart Broad 1173 - 18.00 1491 22.93
55 38 38 South Africa Dale Steyn 817 - 14.08 879 15.98
55 61 57 New Zealand Nathan McCullum 1093 - 19.08 1257 22.85
51 39 38 England Graeme Swann 810 - 15.08 859 16.84
50 42 42 Bangladesh Shakib Al Hasan 937 5 18.07 1048 20.96
Last updated: 24 January 2016[12]

Dynamic and graphical statistics[edit]

The advent of saturation television coverage of professional cricket has provided an impetus to develop new and interesting forms of presenting statistical data to viewers. Television networks have thus invented several new ways of presenting statistics.

These include displaying two-dimensional and even three-dimensional plots of shot directions and distances on an overhead view of a cricket field, commonly referred to as a Wagon-Wheel[4]. Other forms include graphs of run scoring and wicket taking numbers plotted against time or balls bowled over a career or within a match. These graphics can be changed dynamically through a computer controlled back-end, as statistics evolve during a game. Commonly used graphics, especially during a limited-over match, are a worm graph[5], called so, for the worm-like appearance of the teams' score progression as the overs progress; and; a Manhattan Chart[6], called so, for its resemblance to the Manhattan skyline.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]