Cuts You Up

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"Cuts You Up"
Peter murphy cuts uk.jpg
Single by Peter Murphy
from the album Deep
Released 1990
Format
Length 5:24 (album version)
4:13 (radio edit)
Label Beggars Banquet
Writer(s)
  • Peter Murphy
  • Paul Statham
Producer(s) Simon Rogers
Peter Murphy singles chronology
"The Line Between the Devil's Teeth (And That Which Cannot Be Repeat)"
(1989)
"Cuts You Up"
(1990)
"A Strange Kind of Love"
(1990)

"Cuts You Up" is a song by English musician Peter Murphy, from his third solo studio album, Deep (1989). It was released as a single in 1990 through Beggars Banquet Records. The song became Murphy's most successful release, topping at Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart, as well as charting on Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks charts.

The live versions of the song appear in on the b-side of "You're So Close" (1992) single and Alive Just for Love live album, released in 2001.[1]

Background and recording[edit]

"Cuts You Up" features a melodic violin line over a bed of acoustic guitars, keyboards, percussion, and bass guitar.[2] Peter Murphy described the song as "having a very driving, acoustic quality to it and lots of sort of hooky, melodic overtones to it with a not-so-straight lyric." Producer Simon Rogers stated that "Murphy brought the song to the sessions in more-or-less its final form," describing it as "pretty much exactly like the demo."[1]

Murphy also visualized the violin part that runs through the performance and used a sample. Rogers recruited a viola player to play the line. Nevertheless, he wasn't satisfied with the live recording of the strings, stating that "it didn't have the atmosphere and was too moody." The sample was eventually retained for the finished release.[1]

Reception[edit]

Commercial[edit]

"Cuts You Up" was the second single from the record. It became a modern rock hit in United States in 1990, spending seven weeks at the top of the Modern Rock Tracks charts. It also charted on Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks, peaking at number 55 and number 10, respectively.[3] The single also sold over 250,000 copies in three weeks.[1] Following its success, Deep reached number 44 on the Billboard 200 album chart.[3]

Critical[edit]

Ned Raggett of Allmusic described the song as "a love song with solid energy and an inspired vocal" and "a perfect calling card for the album as a whole."[4] Allmusic staff editor Stephen Thomas Erlewine also labeled the song as "Bowie-esque."[3]

The track was also featured as number 40 on PopMatters' "The 100 Greatest Alternative Singles of the ‘80s" list.[5]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Cuts You Up (Edit)" 4:13
2. "Roll Call (Reprise)" 8:20
3. "Cuts You Up" 5:24
4. "A Strange Kind of Love (Version II)" 5:20

Personnel[edit]

The Hundred Men
  • Terl Bryant – drums, percussion
  • Eddie Branch – bass
  • Paul Statham – guitar, keyboards
  • Peter Bonas – guitar
Technical personnel
  • Simon Rogers – production, acoustic guitar; mixing (2-4)
  • Ian Grimble – engineering
  • Steve Rooke – mastering
  • Alastair Johnson – recording
  • Roland Herrington – recording
  • Nick Rogers – mixing (1)

Chart performances[edit]

Chart (1990) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100[6] 55
US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[7] 1
US Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[8] 10

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Thompson, Dave. "Peter Murphy - Cuts You Up". Allmusic. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  2. ^ "Peter Murphy - Deep". CD Review. 6 (7-12): 180. 1990. 
  3. ^ a b c Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Peter Murphy". Allmusic. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  4. ^ Raggett, Ned. "Peter Murphy - Deep". Allmusic. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Gerard, Chris (October 1, 2015). "The 100 Greatest Alternative Singles of the '80s". PopMatters. Retrieved November 19, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Peter Murphy - Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "Peter Murphy - Modern Rock Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  8. ^ "Peter Murphy - Mainstream Rock Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 

External links[edit]

See also[edit]