David H. Huntoon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
David H. Huntoon, Jr.
LTG David Huntoon.jpg
LTG David H. Huntoon, Jr.
Born (1951-10-27) October 27, 1951 (age 66)
Germany[1]
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch Emblem of the United States Department of the Army.svg United States Army
Years of service 1973-2013
Rank US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General
Commands held Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, Commandant of the United States Army War College
Awards Distinguished Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, Legion of Merit (with five oak leaf clusters), Bronze Star, Expert Infantryman Badge, Parachute Qualification Badge, Ranger tab

Lieutenant General David Holmes Huntoon, Jr., served a 40-year military career in the U.S. Army. In his last assignment he was the Superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York[2] from July 15, 2010 until July 15, 2013. During his service, Huntoon served in infantry, planning, operations, training, strategy, and leader development positions, and commanded organizations from platoon level to Army Major Command.[2] He is the only Army general officer to have led the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College,[3] the U.S. Army War College,[4] and the U.S. Military Academy.[5] Huntoon significantly influenced leader development programs in the U.S. Army as a general officer.[2][6][5][7][8] As a Major, he wrote principal elements of the U.S. operational plan for the United States invasion of Panama in 1989,[9][10][11] and was a lead planner in the XVIII Airborne Corps' plan for Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991).[12]

Biography[edit]

Following his graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1973,[2] General Huntoon served as an Infantry Officer in a series of command and staff assignments in the United States and Germany. Following attendance at the Command and General Staff College and the School for Advanced Military Studies at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he was assigned to XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. There he deployed as a Senior War Plans Officer for Operation Just Cause and Operations Desert Shield[13] and Desert Storm.[9][10][12][11] From 1992-1994, he commanded a mechanized infantry battalion at Camp Casey, Korea, and served in Combined and Joint Plans for the Combined Forces Command and United Nations Command in Seoul. From 1994-1995, he was the Army's National Security Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He then took command of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard). Following his service as the Executive Officer to the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army, he was selected as an Army brigadier general, serving as a flag officer for the next thirteen years.[2] His general officer assignments were as Assistant Division Commander of the 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; leadership of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College;[6] Director of Strategy, Plans and Policy for the US Army; Commandant of the U.S. Army War College; and Director of the Army Staff in the Pentagon.[2]

Dates of rank[edit]

Insignia Rank Component Date
US-O1 insignia.svg
Second Lieutenant Regular Army June 6, 1973
US-O2 insignia.svg
 First Lieutenant Regular Army June 6, 1975
US-O3 insignia.svg
 Captain Regular Army June 6, 1977
US-O4 insignia.svg
 Major Regular Army October 1, 1984
US-O5 insignia.svg
 Lieutenant Colonel Regular Army January 1, 1991
US-O6 insignia.svg
 Colonel Regular Army September 1, 1995
US-O7 insignia.svg
 Brigadier General Regular Army November 1, 1999
US-O8 insignia.svg
 Major General Regular Army January 1, 2003
US-O9 insignia.svg
 Lieutenant General Army of the United States January 25, 2008
US-O9 insignia.svg
 Lieutenant General Retired List 2013

Awards and decorations[edit]

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Distinguished Service Medal[14] with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Silver oak leaf cluster
Legion of Merit with silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze Star Medal ribbon.svg Bronze Star[15]
Defense Meritorious Service Medal ribbon.svg Defense Meritorious Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Meritorious Service Medal with three bronze oak leaf clusters
Joint Service Commendation Medal ribbon.svg Joint Service Commendation Medal
Army Commendation Medal ribbon.svg Army Commendation Medal
Joint Service Achievement Medal ribbon.svg Joint Service Achievement Medal
Joint Meritorious Unit Award ribbon.svg Joint Meritorious Unit Award
Superior Unit Award
Bronze star
Bronze star
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal ribbon.svg Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Southwest Asia Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal ribbon.svg Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Korea Defense Service Medal ribbon.svg Korea Defense Service Medal
Army Service Ribbon.svg Army Service Ribbon
Army Overseas Service Ribbon.svg Overseas Service Ribbon
Ordre national du Merite Chevalier ribbon.svg National Order of Merit (France), Knight
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia) ribbon.svg Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia)
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait) ribbon.svg Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)
Expert Infantry Badge.svg Expert Infantryman Badge[16]
United States Air Force Parachutist Badge.svg Basic Parachutist Badge
Ranger Tab.svg Ranger tab
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svg Joint Chiefs of Staff Badge
United States Army Staff Identification Badge.png United States Army Staff Identification Badge
US Army 18th Airborne Corps CSIB.png XVIII Airborne Corps Combat Service Identification Badge
Canadian jump wings.png Canadian Jump Wings

Publications[edit]

  • Major David Huntoon, The Aleutians, Lessons from a Forgotten Campaign, School for Advanced Military Studies, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Monograph #1, Spring 1988
  • Major David Huntoon, Tank Destroyers—A New Look at Old Doctrine, School for Advanced Military Studies, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, SAMS Monograph #2, Fall 1987
  • LTC David Huntoon, Winning the peace: Achieving the Commander-in-Chief’s vision in U.S. //Military Interventions Through Institutional Reforms in the Interagency Process, Working Papers in International Studies, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 1995
  • Williamson Murray, A Nation at War in an Era of Strategic Change, Forward by Major General David H. Huntoon, Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2004
  • Linda Witmer, Changing Images, The Art and Artists of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, Forward by Major General David H. Huntoon Jr., Cumberland County Historical Society, 2008
  • Edward Cox, Grey Eminence: Fox Conner and the Art of Mentorship, introduction by LTG David Huntoon, New Forums Press Inc., March 2011
  • Williamson Murray, Strategic Challenges for Counterinsurgency and the Global War on Terrorism, Forward by Major General David H. Huntoon Jr., Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2011
  • Col. Robert J. Dalessandro, Army Officer's Guide: 51st Edition, Forward by LTG David H. Huntoon Jr., Stackpole Books, 2011
  • Major General Eric Bonnemaison, Thou, My Fellow Officer, Preface by Lieutenant General David Huntoon, Economica, 2012
  • Col. Robert J. Dalessandro, Army Officer's Guide: 52nd Edition, Forward by LTG David H. Huntoon Jr., Stackpole Books, 2013
  • Quarterly articles in U.S. Military Academy Association of Graduates Journal, West Point, July 2010-July 2013
  • Quarterly articles on US Military Academy West Point home page, July 2010-July 2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Register of Graduates and Former Cadets, United States Military Academy". 6 March 1986. Retrieved 6 March 2018 – via Google Books. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f U.S. Army Officer Record Brief, October 31, 2013
  3. ^ http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/carl/resources/ftlvn/DeputyCommadants.pdf
  4. ^ "USAWC". www.carlisle.army.mil. Retrieved 6 March 2018. 
  5. ^ a b "Lt. Gen. David H. Huntoon Jr. Becomes New Superintendent of West Point". foxnews.com. 22 July 2010. Retrieved 6 March 2018. 
  6. ^ a b Deputy Commandants of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
  7. ^ [1][dead link]
  8. ^ http://www.usma.edu/oir/WPLDS%20Outcomes2/WPLDS%20Handbook%20(Oct%202012).pdf
  9. ^ a b Donnelly, Thomas; Roth, Margaret; Baker, Caleb (1991). Operation Just Cause, Macmillan, pp 37-38, 40, 47, 57-58, 60-62, 72-78, 97
  10. ^ a b Flanagan, Edward M. (1993). Battle for Panama, Washington: Brassey’s, pp 17, 33, 36
  11. ^ a b Yates, Lawrence A. (2008). The U.S. Military Intervention in Panama, Center of Military History, pp 132, 221-222, 246, 263-264. 266, 268-269
  12. ^ a b Flanagan, Edward M. (1994). Lightning, the 101st in the Gulf War, Brassey’s, pp 105-107
  13. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/07/22/lt-gen-david-h-huntoon-jr-new-superintendent-west-point.html
  14. ^ http://www.jinsa.org/professional-staff/lt-gen-david-h-huntoon-jr-usa-ret
  15. ^ http://www.recordonline.com/article/20100719/news/100719804
  16. ^ https://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/private/person.asp?personId=128587588&privcapId=4239131

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Franklin L. Hagenbeck
Superintendents of the United States Military Academy
2010–2013
Succeeded by
Robert L. Caslen