Deacon Andrew Hetfield House

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Deacon Andrew Hetfield House
Deacon Andrew Hetfield House, Mountainside, NJ.jpg
Deacon Andrew Hetfield House is located in Union County, New Jersey
Deacon Andrew Hetfield House
Location Constitution Plaza, Mountainside, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°40′19″N 74°21′29″W / 40.67194°N 74.35806°W / 40.67194; -74.35806Coordinates: 40°40′19″N 74°21′29″W / 40.67194°N 74.35806°W / 40.67194; -74.35806
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 89001004[1]
NJRHP # 4433[2]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 27, 1989
Designated NJRHP June 8, 1989

Deacon Andrew Hetfield House, also known as the Hetfield House or the Dutch Oven House, is a historical house in Mountainside, Union County, New Jersey, United States. It was built around 1763 by Deacon Andrew Hetfield, who was a Presbyterian deacon in Westfield. The Hetfield House was nicknamed "the Dutch Oven House" during its stint as an antique store during the 1930s-1980s.

The house has been moved twice: once to shift it 50 feet back when they were widening the nearby highway, and a second relocation in 1985 to save it from bulldozing. Reportedly, the house suffered minimal structural damage from the second move (one windowpane was lost).

The Hetfield House has been expanded over the years; as of 1830, the simple colonial farmhouse had been transformed “into a center-hall Georgian residence” (New Jersey Historical Commission, p. 24).


  1. ^ Staff (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. June 4, 2012. p. 6. Retrieved August 31, 2012. 
  • Conklin, J. (2011). New Providence Daily Photo. "Hetfield House".
  • McNamara, C. (2010). A History of Mountainside, 1945-2007: It Was Only Yesterday. The History Press: Charleston, SC. ISBN 1596298014.
  • New Jersey Historical Commission. (2011). Four Centuries in a Weekend. “10. Mountainside: Deacon Andrew Hetfield House, Constitution Plaza.” (pamphlet).