Deadpool (comic book)

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Deadpool is the name of multiple comic book titles featuring the character Deadpool and published by Marvel Comics, beginning with the original Deadpool comic book series which debuted in 1997.

Publication history[edit]

Volume 1[edit]

In 1997, Deadpool was given his own ongoing title, initially written by Joe Kelly, with then-newcomer Ed McGuinness as an artist. Deadpool became an action comedy parody of the cosmic drama, antihero-heavy comics of the time. The series firmly established his supporting cast, including his prisoner/den mother Blind Al and his best friend Weasel. The ongoing series gained cult popularity for its unorthodox main character and its balance of angst and pop culture slapstick and the character became less of a villain, though the element of his moral ambiguity remained. The writer Joe Kelly noted, "With Deadpool, we could do anything we wanted because everybody just expected the book to be cancelled every five seconds, so nobody was paying attention. And we could get away with it."[1] Reportedly Kelly introduced the fourth wall breaking gimmick.[2]

The series was taken over by Christopher Priest who noted that he found Kelly's issues to be "complex and a little hostile to new readers like me" and that by issue 37, he realized that "it was okay to make Deadpool look stupid."[3] Kelly may have introduced Deadpool to breaking the fourth wall, but Priest "could be credited for establishing it as an essential part of the character’s personality and worldview." Priest left the series after only one year at issue #45.[2]

For a time, writers who followed generally ignored the fourth wall entirely, until Gail Simone took over with issue #65. Her version is remembered for the frequent use of the "little yellow boxes."[2] Deadpool lasted until issue #69, at which point it was relaunched as a new title by Simone with a similar character called Agent X in 2002. This occurred during a line wide revamp of X-Men related comics, with Cable becoming Soldier X and X-Force becoming X-Statix. Simone notes that 'When I took the Deadpool job, the revamp hadn't been planned, so it was a complete surprise. Thankfully, we heard about it in time to make adjustments to the early scripts'.[4] It appeared that Deadpool was killed in an explosion fighting the supervillain Black Swan. Deadpool's manager, Sandi Brandenberg later founded Agency X with a mysterious man called Alex Hayden, who took the name dubbed Agent X. Deadpool later returned to the series. Simone left the title after seven issues due to creative differences with the series editor, but then returned to conclude with issues 13–15.[5][better source needed]

Volume 2[edit]

A new Deadpool ongoing series written by Daniel Way with artist Paco Medina began as a Secret Invasion tie-in. In the first arc, the character is seen working with Nick Fury to steal data on how to kill the Skrull queen Veranke.[6][7] Norman Osborn steals the information that Deadpool had stolen from the Skrulls, and subsequent stories deal with the fallout from that. Writer Daniel Way explained, "the first thing Osborn does to try and take care of the situation is to bring in a hired gun to take Deadpool down, which would be Tiger-Shark. That would be the standard thing to do, but of course everything about Deadpool is non-standard. So it goes completely awry and Norman has to get more serious about things." The story also sees the return of Bob, Agent of HYDRA, "I don't want the book to become 'Deadpool and Friends' so characters will drift in and out, but Bob was someone I definitely wanted to bring in. It just had to be at the perfect moment and when I was putting this storyline together that moment presented itself." This all led directly to a confrontation with the new Thunderbolts in "Magnum Opus" which crossed over between Deadpool vol. 2 #8–9 and Thunderbolts #130–131.[8] Thunderbolts writer Andy Diggle said, "it's a natural progression for Deadpool to go after Norman, and for Norman to send his personal hit-squad after Deadpool."[9] In Deadpool #15, Deadpool decides to become a hero resulting in conflicts with proper heroes like Spider-Man[10] (who he had recently encountered in The Amazing Spider-Man #611 as part of "The Gauntlet"[11]) and leading to a 3-issue arc where he takes on Hit-Monkey,[12] a character who debuted in the same month in a digital, then print, one-shot.[13][14]

A special anniversary issue titled Deadpool #900 was released in October 2009. It features stories written by several authors, with the main feature written by the original Deadpool series writer Joe Kelly and drawn by Deadpool's creator Rob Liefeld.

Volume 3[edit]

As part of Marvel's Marvel NOW! initiative a new Deadpool ongoing series was launched, written by Brian Posehn and Gerry Duggan and illustrated by Tony Moore.[15] In the 27th issue of his new series, as part of "All-New Marvel NOW!", Deadpool was married for the third time. Initially a secret, his bride was revealed in the web comic Deadpool: The Gauntlet to be Shiklah, Queen of the Undead. Deadpool also discovers that he has a daughter by the name of Eleanor from a former flame of Deadpool named Carmelita.[16]

Deadpool's death occurs in Deadpool #250, involving story ideas that cowriters Gerry Duggan and Brian Posehn have had in mind since the beginning of the NOW series.[17] Issue #250 was technically issue #45, but was so named as it was the cumulative 250th issue of the character's solo series.[citation needed] Deadpool faces off in a final showdown with ULTIMATUM and Flag-Smasher, killing all of them, and gives up the "Deadpool" identity, wishing to have a better life. He, along with his family and friends, (and presumably everyone on Earth) are all killed when the Earth collides with an alternate universe's Earth. Deadpool laments that the Secret Wars should have stayed an Avengers event, but then dies at peace, content that everybody else is dying with him.[18]

Volume 4[edit]

Deadpool Vol. 4 began in 2016.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rogers, Vaneta (2009-07-16). "2 Great Tastes That Taste Great Together: Joe Kelly/Deadpool". Newsarama.com. Retrieved August 12, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c Kate Willaert (July 8, 2013). "You don't know merc: a history of Deadpool". acriticalhit.com. A Critical Hit. 
  3. ^ Priest, Christopher (September 2000). "adventures in the funnybook game – Deadpool". Christopher Priest official site. Retrieved August 15, 2009. 
  4. ^ Thomas, Brandon. "The Gail Simone Dialogues". Silver Bullet Comics. Retrieved August 12, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Gail Simone Has All the Answers". Word Balloon with John Siuntres (Podcast). October 30, 2008. Retrieved August 21, 2009. 
  6. ^ "NYCC '08: Deadpool Goes Solo" (news). Retrieved May 4, 2008. 
  7. ^ Daniel Way (w), Steve Dillon (a). "The Deep End" Wolverine: Origins 25: 24/1 (May 2008), Marvel.
  8. ^ Richards, Dave (December 16, 2008)."Way Talks Deadpool & Thunderbolts, Bob". Comic Book Resources.
  9. ^ Thunderbolts vs. Deadpool: FIGHT, Newsarama, December 16, 2008.
  10. ^ Richards, Dave (December 8, 2009). "Daniel Way Bets on "Deadpool"". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  11. ^ Richards, Dave (July 16, 2009). "Deadpool Vs. Spidey! By Joe Kelly!". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  12. ^ Richards, Dave (February 11, 2010). "Way Makes Things "Tricky" for "Deadpool"". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  13. ^ Strom, Marc (November 13, 2009). "The Coming of Hitman Monkey". Marvel.com. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  14. ^ Marshall, Mick (February 2, 2010). "Exclusive: 'Hit-Monkey' Has Arrived. You Have Been Warned". MTV. Retrieved May 29, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Marvel NOW! Q&A: Deadpool - Marvel Heroes - News - Marvel.com". marvel.com. 
  16. ^ Deadpool #19. Marvel Comics.
  17. ^ Marvel reveals Deadpool will die in April 2015. January 9, 2015.
  18. ^ Deadpool (2012) #45. Marvel Comics.