Delia (fly)

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Delia
Delia.radicum.jpg
Delia radicum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Family: Anthomyiidae
Subfamily: Anthomyiinae
Tribe: Hydrophoriini
Genus: Delia
Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830
Type species
Delia floricola
Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830
Synonyms [1]
  • Eroischia Lioy, 1864
  • Leptohylemyia Schnabl & Dziedzicki, 1911
  • Cimbotoma Lioy, 1864
  • Gastrolepta Lioy, 1864
  • Trigonostoma Lioy, 1864
  • Crinura Schnabl & Dziedzicki, 1911
  • Chortophilina Karl, 1928
  • Flavena Karl, 1928
  • Tricharia Karl, 1928
  • Atrichodelia Karl, 1943
  • Bisetaria Karl, 1943
  • Chaetodelia Karl, 1943
  • Leucodelia Karl, 1943
  • Monodelia Karl, 1943
  • Subdelia Karl, 1943
  • Trichohylemyia Karl, 1943

The genus Delia is part of the fly family Anthomyiidae.

The genus Delia contains approximately 300–340 species worldwide (excluding Neotropical species). At present about 170 species are recorded from the Palaearctic region, and 162 species from the Nearctic region, 44 of which are Holarctic. Afrotropical fauna includes 20 Delia species.[2] Griffiths [3][4][5][6] described 49 new species in his recent revision of the Nearctic species, nearly a third of the present Nearctic total, and similar intensive revisions in other parts of the world are expected to produce many more, especially in the Middle East, mountainous regions of Central Asia, Nepal, and Mongolia.

Biology[edit]

Several important agricultural pests are Delia species, including D. radicum, the cabbage maggot, D. floralis, the turnip maggot, and D. antiqua, the onion maggot. The larvae of these flies, which tunnel into roots and stems of host plants, can cause considerable agricultural yield losses. Although most members of this genus have larvae that feed on stems, flowers, and fruits of plants, a few others have larvae that are leaf miners. The larvae of Afrotropical Delia species are mainly phytophagous, and have been found in various cereal crops and grasses, including Cynodon, Secale, Hordeum, Setaria, Pennisetum, Chloris, Sorghum, and Eleusine species.

The cabbage maggot has been successfully reared in colonies for research purposes.

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. Soos & L. Papp, ed. (1986). Catalogue of Palaearctic Diptera. Vol. 13, Anthomyiidae - Tachinidae. Hungarian Natural History Museum. p. 624 pp. ISBN 963-7093-21-4. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h D. M. Ackland (2008). "Revision of Afrotropical Delia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), with descriptions of six new species". African Invertebrates. 49 (1): 1–75. doi:10.5733/afin.049.0101. 
  3. ^ Griffiths, G.C.D. 1991a. Anthomyiidae [part]. In: Griffiths, G.C.D., ed., Flies of the Nearctic Region. Vol. 8, part 2. 7: 953–1048.
  4. ^ Griffiths, G.C.D. 1991b. Anthomyiidae [part]. In: Griffiths, G.C.D., ed., Flies of the Nearctic Region. Vol. 8, part 2. 8: 1049–1240.
  5. ^ Griffiths, G.C.D. 1992. Anthomyiidae [part]. In: Griffiths, G.C.D., ed., Flies of the Nearctic Region. Vol. 8, part 2. 9: 1241–1416.
  6. ^ Griffiths, G.C.D. 1993. Anthomyiidae [part]. In: Griffiths, G.C.D., ed., Flies of the Nearctic Region. Vol. 8, part 2. 10: 1417–1632.

External links[edit]