DIBOL

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Dibol
Paradigm procedural, imperative, structured
Developer DEC
First appeared 1970
Stable release Dibol 1992 / 2002
Typing discipline static
Major implementations
Synergex DBL, DEC VAX Dibol, others
Influenced by
BASIC, Fortran, COBOL

DiBOL or Digital's Business Oriented Language is a general-purpose, procedural, imperative programming language, designed for use in Management Information Systems (MIS) software development. It has a syntax similar to FORTRAN and BASIC, along with BCD arithmetic. It shares the COBOL program structure of data and procedure divisions.

History[edit]

DIBOL was originally marketed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in 1970.

The original version, DIBOL-8, was produced for PDP-8, and DIBOL-32 VAX/VMS systems, though it can also be run on other systems through emulators.

DIBOL-11 was developed for the PDP-11 running COS-350 operating system. It also ran on CTS-300, RSX-11, and RT-11.

The DECmate II supports the COS-310 Commercial Operating System, featuring DIBOL.[1]

ANSI Standards were released in 1983, 1988 and 1992 (ANSI X3.165-1992). The 1992 standard was revised in 2002.

DIBOL compilers were developed by several other companies, including DBL from DISC (later Synergex), Softbol from Omtool,[2] and Unibol from Software Ireland, Ltd.[3] Development of DIBOL effectively ceased after 1993, when an agreement between DEC and DISC replaced DIBOL with DBL on VAX, AlphaAXP, OSF/1, and SCO Unix.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Introduction to DIBOL-83. Digital Equipment Corporation.". April 1984. 
  2. ^ Enterprise, I. D. G. (1985-10-07). Computerworld. IDG Enterprise. p. 66. 
  3. ^ Babcock, Charles (1985-09-30). AT&T unwraps applications packages for 3B series. ComputerWorld (IDG Enterprise). p. 28. 
  4. ^ "DISC ANNOUNCES NEW DIBOL STRATEGY IN ASSOCIATION WITH DIGITAL". www.thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 2016-04-12. 
  5. ^ "Area Software Firm Gets DEC Contract". The Sacramento Bee. February 18, 1993. 

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