Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House

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Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie House 69 Delafield Place, Staten Island, NY.jpg
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House, September 2012
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House is located in New York City
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House is located in New York
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House is located in the US
Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House
Location 69 Delafield Pl., Staten Island, New York
Coordinates 40°38′38″N 74°6′37″W / 40.64389°N 74.11028°W / 40.64389; -74.11028Coordinates: 40°38′38″N 74°6′37″W / 40.64389°N 74.11028°W / 40.64389; -74.11028
Area less than one acre
Architect Dr. Samuel, MacKenzie Elliott
Architectural style Gothic Cottage
NRHP Reference # 80002757[1]
Added to NRHP March 28, 1980

Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House is an 1840[2] historic home located at West New Brighton, Staten Island, New York. It was one of 22 similar houses in the area designed and built as investments by Scottish born Samuel Mackenzie Elliott, an oculist and eye surgeon who boasted prominent clients like John Jacob Astor, Peter Cooper, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Horace Greeley.[2] So great was his influence on the first settlement of this part of the north shore of Staten Island that the neighborhood was then known as "Elliotville".[2] It is a 2 12-story, dark grey, locally quarried stone cottage in the Gothic style cottage. It has a gable roof with a small, pointed arch window under the rear gable.[3]

Elliot was an active abolitionist, and this house, along with his own, was reputedly outfitted as a refuge for slaves escaping the United States via the Underground Railroad.[2]

It was designated a New York City Landmark in 1967,[2] and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Landmarks Preservation Committee report" (PDF). 12 April 1967. Landmarks Preservation Committee. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  3. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2016-04-01. [permanent dead link] Note: This includes Virginia Kurshan; Elizabeth Spencer-Ralph; Joan R. Olshansky (August 1979). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Dr. Samuel MacKenzie Elliott House" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-04-01.  and Accompanying four photographs

External links[edit]