Egypt at the 1906 Intercalated Games

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Egypt at the
1906 Intercalated Olympics
Flag of Egypt (1844-1867).svg
IOC code EGY
NOC Egyptian Olympic Committee
Website www.egyptianolympic.org (Arabic) (English)
in Athens
Competitors 2 in 3 sports
Medals
Gold Silver Bronze Total
0 0 0 0
Summer appearances
Winter appearances

Two athletes, both men, competed under the Egyptian banner at the 1906 Intercalated Games in Athens, Greece, and took part in five events across three sports. Arthur Marson, a track and field athlete, did not place within the top six in the 5 mile and failed to finish the marathon. Eugenio Colombani competed in cycling and Greco-Roman wrestling, but did not reach the finals of either event.[1] Egypt, therefore, did not win any medals at the Games.

Background[edit]

The 1906 Intercalated Games are no longer recognized as Olympic by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), but they were considered as such by contemporary sources.[2] In 1906, Egypt was de jure under the control of the Ottoman Empire, but had been de facto run by the British since 1882.[3] At the 1896 Summer Olympics, an athlete by the name of Dionysios Kasdaglis competed in tennis and won silver medals in the singles and doubles tournaments. Kasdaglis is listed as Greek by the IOC for the singles, but in the doubles he and his Greek partner Demetrios Petrokokkinos are listed as a "mixed team".[4] Kasdaglis had British citizenship, but lived in Egypt and was a member of Egyptian clubs, and thus he has been considered by some as an Egyptian Olympian.[5][6] The Egyptian Olympic Committee, founded in 1910, considers Egypt's first Olympic delegation to have been at the 1912 Summer Olympics,[7] which is supported by that year's official report,[8] but there is uncertainty as to whether the fencer they sent actually competed.[9] Egypt took part in the Olympic Games, with athletes of Egyptian descent, in 1920.[10]

Two athletes, Arthur Marson and Eugenio Colombani, marched under the flag of the Khedivate of Egypt (an Ottoman Olympic Committee would not be formed until 1908),[11] in what was the first full opening ceremony for an event considered Olympic.[2] Marson, competing in track and field athletics, was a member of the Greek Ifitos Kairou club of Cairo.[12] Colombani, of the Egyptian[13] cycling club Soc. Palaestra Boccolini, took part in cycling and Greco-Roman wrestling.[1] Neither athlete won a medal.[14]

Athletics[edit]

Marson competed in two events in Athens: the marathon and the 5 mile. In the marathon, which was slightly shorter than the distance of the traditional marathon, he was one of the 38 entrants (out of 53 total) who did not finish the race.[15] His placement in the 5 mile is unknown, but he did not finish in the top six.[16]

Cycling[edit]

Colombani took part in two cycling events in Athens: the sprint and the 20 kilometers. In the sprint, he lost in both the opening round and repêchage heats and did not advance to the final. In the 20 kilometers, he completed the opening round successfully, but in a time that did not qualify him for the finals.[1]

Wrestling[edit]

Colombani competed in the men's lightweight division of Greco-Roman wrestling in Athens. He was eliminated in Round One by Carl Carlsen of Denmark, who would go on to win the silver medal in the event.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Eugenio Colombani Bio, Stats, and Results". Olympics. Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  2. ^ a b Grasso, John; Bill Mallon; Jeroen Heijmans (2015-05-14). Historical Dictionary of the Olympic Movement (5 ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. p. xlvi. ISBN 1442248602. 
  3. ^ Sicker, Martin (2001). The Middle East in the Twentieth Century. Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 101. ISBN 0275968936. 
  4. ^ "Doubles Men". International Olympic Committee. 2016. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  5. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Dimitrios Kasdaglis Bio, Stats, and Results". Olympics. Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  6. ^ Conner, Floyd (2001-10-31). The Olympic's Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of the Olympics' Gold Medal Gaffes, Improbable Triumphs, and Other Oddities. Lincoln, Nebraska: Potomac Books. p. 11. ISBN 1597973971. 
  7. ^ "History". Egyptian Olympic Committee. 2015. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  8. ^ "The Official Report of the Olympic Games of Stockholm 1912" (PDF). Stockholm: Swedish Olympic Committee. 1913: 889. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  9. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Fencing at the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  10. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Egypt at the 1920 Antwerpen Summer Games". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  11. ^ "Tarihçe". Turkish Olympic Committee. 2016. Retrieved 2016-10-18.  (Turkish)
  12. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Arthur Marson Bio, Stats, and Results". Olympics. Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  13. ^ "Soc. Palaestra Boccolini 1906" (in French). siteducyclisme.net. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  14. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Egypt at the 1906 Intercalated Games". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  15. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Athletics at the 1906 Athina Summer Games: Men's Marathon". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  16. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Athletics at the 1906 Athina Summer Games: Men's 5 mile". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18. 
  17. ^ Gjerde, Arild; Jeroen Heijmans; Bill Mallon; Hilary Evans (June 2016). "Wrestling at the 1906 Athina Summer Games: Men's Lightweight, Greco-Roman". Sports Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-18.