F the Prom

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F the Prom
F the Prom poster.png
Theatrical release poster
Directed byBenny Fine
Produced by
  • Benny Fine
  • Rafi Fine
Written by
  • Benny Fine
  • Rafi Fine
  • Molly Prather
Starring
Music by
CinematographySpencer Hutchins
Edited byJeremy M. Inman
Production
company
Distributed byThe Orchard
Release date
  • December 5, 2017 (2017-12-05)
Running time
92 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

F the Prom (also known as F*&% the Prom) is a 2017 American teen comedy direct-to-video film directed and produced by Benny Fine and written by Fine Brothers and Molly Prather. The film stars Danielle Campbell, Joel Courtney, Madelaine Petsch, Cameron Palatas, Meg DeLacy, Nicholle Tom, Richard Karn, Jill Cimorelli, Luke Bilyk, Brendan Calton, Michael Chey, Adan Allende, Diamond White, Cheri Oteri and Ian Ziering. It released online and on-demand on December 5, 2017.[1][2]

Plot[edit]

Maddy Datner and her best friend Cole Reed attend their first day of high school at Charles Adams High. Cole is subjected to a prank by a fellow student, revealing his white briefs, earning him the nickname "Tighty". Rather than stand up for him, Maddy decides not to intervene, and refuses to talk to Cole from that point on. Three years later, Maddy is at the top of the social hierarchy, and is dating the hottest guy at school, Kane. Cole, still shunned by his peers, has decided to apply to a prestigious art college.

Maddy catches her best friend Marissa making out with Kane. Revealing her disgust with Maddy's recent self-centered behavior, Marissa explains that she intends to be crowned Queen at the upcoming senior prom, which Maddy was expected to win. That night, Maddy goes to Cole's house, and they reconnect, reminiscing about their former friendship. Maddy suggests that they ruin the prom, enlisting Cole's friend Felicity to help. Felicity refuses to help at first, but when Maddy stands up for Cole against Kane, she agrees, and enlists the help of other social outcasts to execute the plan.

Maddy announces that she intends to take Cole to the prom, which greatly increases his status. Marissa tries to steal Cole's affections, but he rebuffs her. Kane, meanwhile, seeks forgiveness from Maddy. Felicity reveals that at one time, she and Kane were together, until Marissa manipulated Kane into dumping her for Maddy. As the date for prom approaches, Maddy forgives Kane and reneges on her commitment to take Cole as her date. Feeling hurt, Cole nearly calls the plan off, but his father intervenes. A former prom king himself, he has come to regret his behavior in high school, and believes his lack of humility was the reason why he and Cole's mother ultimately separated. He urges Cole to humble the popular kids so they don't turn out like him.

The night of the prom, Felicity and the other conspirators rig the voting system, drug Marissa's punch, and turn the popular kids against each other using social media, including posting fake pornographic images of one boy. At the end of the night, Maddy is crowned prom queen, and is thus doused with tar—the punishment intended for Marissa—before one of the kids pulls the fire alarm. Marissa takes revenge on Cole for rejecting her by once again pantsing him in front of the crowd. Enraged, Cole delivers a lengthy speech in which he criticizes how the students have hurt each other in pursuit of popularity that is ultimately without meaning or worth.

Cole ignores Maddy for the rest of the school year due to her betrayal at prom. After graduation, however, Cole stops by Maddy's house to give her a graphic novel of his drawings as a going away present. He also confesses his feelings for her. Maddy reciprocates, and they kiss, but Cole ultimately rejects her offer of a relationship, wishing to remain friends instead.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Spangler, Todd (April 4, 2016). "YouTube's Fine Brothers Announce First Film, Comedy 'F*&% the Prom'". Variety. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  2. ^ Weiss, Suzannah (November 15, 2017). "Madelaine Petsch and Danielle Campbell Star in "F the Prom"". Teen Vogue. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  3. ^ Cox, Lauren (November 17, 2017). "'F The Prom': 4 Ways Danielle Campbell's Movie Might Just Be The New 'Mean Girls'". Hollywood Life. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  4. ^ Reilly, Kaitlin (November 17, 2017). "Madelaine Petsch's New Mean Girls-Like Movie Would Make Cheryl Blossom Proud". Refinery29. Retrieved November 22, 2017.

External links[edit]