Fun Dip

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Fun Dip

Fun Dip is a candy manufactured by The Willy Wonka Candy Company, a brand owned by Nestlé. The candy has been on the market in the United States and Canada since the 1940s[1] and was originally called Lik-M-Aid. It was originally manufactured by Fruzola,[2] and then Sunline Inc., through their Sunmark Brands division, which was purchased by Nestlé in January 1989. It comes in many different flavors with candy sticks that are included.

Fun Dip is similar to fellow Wonka product Pixy Stix, but sold in small pouches, rather than paper or plastic straws. When called Lik-M-Aid, it consisted of 4 packets of flavored and colored sugar. When rebranded in the 1970s as Fun Dip, two edible candy sticks called "Lik-A-Stix" were added.[1][3] It is intended to be consumed by licking the sticks and using the moistened stick to collect some of the sugar. While the original flavors consisted of lime, cherry and grape, the most common flavors are cherry, grape, and a raspberry/apple combination that turns from blue when dry to green when wet with saliva or water. It also comes in sour flavors, including sour watermelon, sour apple, and sour lemonade. There is also orange flavored Fun Dip. Packets with one stick and two flavors were once the standard, and packets with only one or two flavors are still available with less prominence than the now-standard three-flavor package.

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Cultural references[edit]

  • In the Disney Channel television series Gravity Falls, this was parodied with the fictional Smile Dip which was banned in Canada and the United States for containing hallucinogenic properties.
  • In the television series, Freaks and Geeks, we see the character, Millie Kentner, played by actress Sarah Hagan, eating from the candy pouch. She refers to what she is eating as Lik-M-Aid, and asks James Franco's character if he would like to try some.
  • The vocals of Skrillex' song "Bangarang" contain the line "I'm eating Fun Dip right now".

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