GSTO2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
GSTO2
Available structures
PDBOrtholog search: PDBe RCSB
Identifiers
AliasesGSTO2, GSTO 2-2, bA127L20.1, glutathione S-transferase omega 2
External IDsMGI: 1915464 HomoloGene: 57057 GeneCards: GSTO2
EC number1.8.5.1
Gene location (Human)
Chromosome 10 (human)
Chr.Chromosome 10 (human)[1]
Chromosome 10 (human)
Genomic location for GSTO2
Genomic location for GSTO2
Band10q25.1Start104,268,873 bp[1]
End104,304,945 bp[1]
Orthologs
SpeciesHumanMouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_001191013
NM_001191014
NM_001191015
NM_183239

NM_026619
NM_030051

RefSeq (protein)

NP_001177942
NP_001177943
NP_001177944
NP_899062

NP_080895
NP_084327

Location (UCSC)Chr 10: 104.27 – 104.3 MbChr 19: 47.87 – 47.89 Mb
PubMed search[3][4]
Wikidata
View/Edit HumanView/Edit Mouse

Glutathione S-transferase omega-2 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the GSTO2 gene.[5][6]

Model organisms[edit]

Model organisms have been used in the study of GSTO2 function. A conditional knockout mouse line called Gsto2tm2a(KOMP)Wtsi was generated at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.[7] Male and female animals underwent a standardized phenotypic screen[8] to determine the effects of deletion.[9][10][11][12] Additional screens performed: - In-depth immunological phenotyping[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000065621 - Ensembl, May 2017
  2. ^ a b c GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000025069 - Ensembl, May 2017
  3. ^ "Human PubMed Reference:".
  4. ^ "Mouse PubMed Reference:".
  5. ^ Whitbread AK, Tetlow N, Eyre HJ, Sutherland GR, Board PG (Mar 2003). "Characterization of the human Omega class glutathione transferase genes and associated polymorphisms". Pharmacogenetics. 13 (3): 131–44. doi:10.1097/00008571-200303000-00003. PMID 12618591.
  6. ^ "Entrez Gene: GSTO2 glutathione S-transferase omega 2".
  7. ^ Gerdin AK (2010). "The Sanger Mouse Genetics Programme: high throughput characterisation of knockout mice". Acta Ophthalmologica. 88: 925–7. doi:10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.4142.x.
  8. ^ a b "International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium".
  9. ^ Skarnes WC, Rosen B, West AP, Koutsourakis M, Bushell W, Iyer V, Mujica AO, Thomas M, Harrow J, Cox T, Jackson D, Severin J, Biggs P, Fu J, Nefedov M, de Jong PJ, Stewart AF, Bradley A (Jun 2011). "A conditional knockout resource for the genome-wide study of mouse gene function". Nature. 474 (7351): 337–42. doi:10.1038/nature10163. PMC 3572410. PMID 21677750.
  10. ^ Dolgin E (Jun 2011). "Mouse library set to be knockout". Nature. 474 (7351): 262–3. doi:10.1038/474262a. PMID 21677718.
  11. ^ Collins FS, Rossant J, Wurst W (Jan 2007). "A mouse for all reasons". Cell. 128 (1): 9–13. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2006.12.018. PMID 17218247.
  12. ^ White JK, Gerdin AK, Karp NA, Ryder E, Buljan M, Bussell JN, Salisbury J, Clare S, Ingham NJ, Podrini C, Houghton R, Estabel J, Bottomley JR, Melvin DG, Sunter D, Adams NC, Tannahill D, Logan DW, Macarthur DG, Flint J, Mahajan VB, Tsang SH, Smyth I, Watt FM, Skarnes WC, Dougan G, Adams DJ, Ramirez-Solis R, Bradley A, Steel KP (Jul 2013). "Genome-wide generation and systematic phenotyping of knockout mice reveals new roles for many genes". Cell. 154 (2): 452–64. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.022. PMC 3717207. PMID 23870131.
  13. ^ a b "Infection and Immunity Immunophenotyping (3i) Consortium".

Further reading[edit]