HD 20367

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
HD 20367
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0 (ICRS)
Constellation Aries
Right ascension  03h 17m 40.05s [1]
Declination +31° 07′ 37.4″ [1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.410 [2]
Characteristics
Spectral type G0[2]
B−V color index 0.523[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)5.3 ± 2[2] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -104.18 ± 0.50 [1] mas/yr
Dec.: 58.11 ± 0.48 [1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)37.48 ± 0.63[1] mas
Distance87 ± 1 ly
(26.7 ± 0.4 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)4.27[3]
Details
Mass1.04 ± 0.06[4] M
Radius1.18 ± 0.32[4] R
Luminosity (visual, LV)1.72[5] L
Surface gravity (log g)4.53 ± 0.22[6] cgs
Temperature5929[4] K
Metallicity[Fe/H] = 0.1[4]
Rotational velocity (v sin i)3[7] km/s
Age8.7 × 108 [4] years
Other designations
AG+30° 340, BD+30° 520, GC 3929, GCRV 1814, GSC 02340-01798, HIP 15323, IRAS 03146+3056, PPM 68307, SAO 56323, TD1 2046, TYC 2340-1798-1.[2]
Database references
SIMBADdata
Planet
HD 20367 b data

HD 20367 is a 6th magnitude star approximately 87 light years away[1] in the constellation of Aries, very close to the border with Perseus. It is a yellow dwarf similar to our Sun (spectral type G0V).

Planetary system[edit]

In June 2002, a 500-day-period Jupiter-mass extrasolar planet was found orbiting eccentrically around the star.[8]

The HD 20367 planetary system[9]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >1.17 MJ 1.246 ± 0.075 469.5 ± 9.3 0.320 ± 0.090

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "HIP 15323". Hipparcos, the New Reduction. Retrieved 2010-02-06.
  2. ^ a b c d e HD 20367 -- Star, database entry, SIMBAD. Accessed on line October 1, 2008.
  3. ^ Anderson, E.; Francis, Ch. (2012), "XHIP: An extended hipparcos compilation", Astronomy Letters, 38 (5): 331, arXiv:1108.4971, Bibcode:2012AstL...38..331A, doi:10.1134/S1063773712050015.
  4. ^ a b c d e Star : HD 20367, entry, Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Accessed on line October 1, 2008.
  5. ^ From absolute visual magnitude, taking MV=4.83 for the Sun.
  6. ^ Table 2, Spectroscopic [Fe/H] for 98 extra-solar planet-host stars. Exploring the probability of planet formation, N. C. Santos, G. Israelian, and M. Mayor, Astronomy and Astrophysics 415 (March 2004), pp. 1153–1166, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20034469, Bibcode2004A&A...415.1153S.
  7. ^ HD 20367, database entry, The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey of Solar neighbourhood, J. Holmberg et al., 2007, CDS ID V/117A. Accessed on line November 19, 2008.
  8. ^ A 1.1 Jupiter-mass planet orbiting HD 20367, Geneva Observatory, October 7, 2002. Accessed on line October 1, 2008.
  9. ^ Table 3, Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets, R. P. Butler et al., The Astrophysical Journal 646, #1 (July 2006), pp. 505–522, Bibcode2006ApJ...646..505B, doi:10.1086/504701.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 03h 17m 40.0461s, +31° 07′ 37.372″